Chapter III. Great young men

Samuel Smiles

 

The world is for the most part young. Children, boys and girls, young men and women, constitute the greater portion of society. Hence the importance we attach to education. Youth is the time of growth and development, of activity and vivacity, of imagination and impulse. The seeds of virtue sown in youth grow into good words and deeds, and eventually ripen into habits. Where the mind and heart have not been duly cultivated in youth, one may look forward to the approach of manhood with dismay, if not despair. Southey says: "Live as long as you may, the first twenty years are the longest half of your life; they appear so while they are passing; they seem to have been so when we look back upon them; and they take up more room in our memory than all the years that succeed them."

 

Each human being contains the ideal of a perfect man, according to the type in which the Creator has fashioned him; just as the block of marble contains the image of an Apollo, to be fashioned by the sculptor into a perfect statue. It is the aim of education to develop the germs of man's better nature, as it is the aim of the sculptor to bring forth the statue from the block of marble.

 

Education begins and ends with life. In this respect it differs from the work of the sculptor. There is no solstice in human development. The body may remain the same in form and features, but the mind is constantly changing. Thoughts, desires, and tastes change by insensible gradations from year to year; and it is, or ought to be, the object of life and education to evolve the best forms of being. We know but little of the circumstances which determine the growth of the intellect, still less of those which influence the heart. Yet the lineaments of character usually display themselves early. An act of will, an expression of taste, even an eager look, will sometimes raise a corner of the veil which conceals the young mind, and furnishes a glimpse of the future man. At the same time knowledge, and the love of knowledge, are not necessarily accompanied by pure taste, good habits, or the social virtues which are essential to the formation of a lofty character.

 

There is, however, no precise and absolute law in the matter. A well-known bishop has said that "little hearts and large brains are produced by many forms of education." At the same time, the conscientious cultivation of the intellect is a duty which all owe to themselves as well as to society. It is usually by waiting long and working diligently, by patient continuance in well-doing, that we can hope to achieve any permanent advantage. The head ought always to be near the heart to enable the greatest intellectual powers to work with wholesome effect. "Truly”, says Emerson, "the life of man is the true romance, which, when valiantly conducted, will yield the imagination a higher joy than any fiction.

 

The difference of age at which men display the ability of thinking, and attain maturity of intellect, and even of imagination, is very remarkable.  "There be some," said Bacon, “who have an over-early ripeness in their years, which fadeth betimes; "corresponding with the words of Quintilian: "Inanibus artistic ante messem flavescunt." This is true of precocious children, who are sometimes found marvellous in their knowledge when young and immature, but of whom nothing is heard when they arrive at maturity. Precocity is often but a disease - the excitement of a fine nervous organisation, or the over-activity of a delicate brain. The boy Heinecken of Lubeck learned the greater part of the Old and New Testament in his second year; he could speak Latin and French in his third year; he studied religion and the history of the Church in his fourth year; and finally, being excitable and sickly, he fell ill and died in his fifth year. Of this poor child it might be said, in Bacon's words that "Phaeton´s car went but a day.”

 

Parents and teachers sometimes forget that the proper function of a child is to grow; that the brain cannot, in early years, be overworked without serious injury to the physical health; that the body –muscles, lungs, and stomach – must first have its soundness established; and that the brain is one of the last organs to come to maturity. Indeed, in early life, digestion is of greater importance then thinking; exercise is necessary for mental culture; and discipline is better than knowledge. Many are the cases of precocious children who bloom only to wither, and run their little course in a few short years. The strain upon their nervous system is more than their physical constitution can bear, and they perish almost as soon as they have begun to live. Boys and girls are at present too much occupied in sitting, learning, studying, and reciting. Their brain is overworked; their body is, underworked. Hence headaches, restlessness, irritability, and eventually debility and disease.

 

Young people are not only deprived of the proper use of their hands and fingers, but of the proper use of their eyes; and the rising generation is growing up usclees-handed as well as short-sighted. Education does not mean stuffing a lot of matter into the brain, but educing, or bringing out the intellect and character. The mind can be best informed by teaching boys and girls how to use their powers; which necessarily includes the exercise of the physical system. If this were more attended to, there would be fewer complaints of the over-pressure of children's brains.

 

There are, however, some children less fragile especially boys who resist the perilous influences of over-excitement, and live to fulfil the promises of their youth. This is especially observed in the case of great musicians. But here there is no over-pressure; for the art comes naturally, and causes only pleasant excitement.  This was especially the case with the great master, Handel, who composed a set of sonatas when only ten years old. His father, a doctor, destined him for the profession of law, and forbade him to touch a musical instrument. He even avoided the boy to a public-school, for there he would be in taught the gamut. But young Handel´s passion for music could not be restrained. He found means to procure a dumb spinet, concealed it in a garret, and went to practice upon the mute instrument while the household were asleep. The Duke of Saxe-Weissenfels at length became acquainted with the boy´s passion, and interceded with his father. It was only then that he was permitted to follow the bent of his genius. In his fourteenth year Handel played in public; in his sixteenth year he set the drama of Almeria to music; in the following year he produced Florinda and Nerone. While at Florence, in his twenty-first year, he composed his first opera, Rodrigo; and at London, in his twenty-sixth year, he produced his famous opera of Rinaldo. He continued to produce his works operas and oratorios; and in 1741, when in his fifty-seventh year, he composed his great work, The Messiah, in the space of only twenty-three days. In the case of Handel, the precocity of the boy exercised no detrimental influence upon the compositions of the man; for his very greatest works were produced late in life, between his fifty-fourth and sixty-seventh year.

 

Haydn was almost as precocious a musician as Handel, having composed a mass at thirteen; yet the offsprings of his finest genius were his latest compositions, after he had become a sexagenarian. The Creation, probably his greatest work, was composed when he was sixty-five. John Sebastian Bach had almost as many difficulties to encounter as Handel in acquiring knowledge of music. His elder brother, John Christopher, the organist, was jealous of him, and hid away a volume containing a collection of pieces by the best harpsichord composers. But Sebastian found the book in a cupboard, where it had been locked up; carried it to his room; sat up at night to copy it without a candle by the light only of the summer night, and sometimes of the moon. His brother at last discovered the secret work, and cruelly carried away both book and copy. But no difficulties or obstructions could resist the force of the boy's genius. At eighteen we find him court musician at Weimar; and from that time his progress was rapid. He had only one rival as an organ-player, and that was Handel.

 

But of all the musical prodigies the greatest was Mozart. He seems to have played apparently by intuition. At four years old he composed tunes before he could write. Two years later he wrote a concerto for the clavier. At twelve he composed his first opera, La Finta Semplice. Even at this early age he could not find his equal on the harpsichord. The professors of Europe stood aghast at a boy who improvised fugues on a given theme, and then took a ride-acock-horse round the room on his father's stick. Mozart was a show-boy, and was taken by his father for exhibition in the principal cities of Europe, where he was seen in his little puce-brown coat, velvet hose, buckled shoes, and long flowing curly hair tied behind. His father made a good deal of money out of the boy's genius. Regardless of his health, which was extremely delicate, he fed him with excitement. Yet the boy was full of uproarious merriment when well. Though he was a master in music, he was a child in everything else. His opera of Mithridates, composed at fourteen, was performed twenty times in succession; and, three years later, his Lucia Silla had twenty-six successive representations. These were followed by other great works the Idomeneo, written at twenty-five; the Figaro, at thirty; the Don Giovanni, at thirty-one; the Clemenza di Tito and the Zauberflote, at thirty-five; and the Requiem, at thirty-six. He wrote the last work on his death-bed. He died in 1792, worn out by hard, or rather by irregular work and excessive excitement. The composer of the Requiem left barely enough to bury him.

 

Beethoven was not as precocious as either Handel or Mozart. His music was, in a measure, thrashed into him by his father, who wished to make him a prodigy. Young Beethoven performed in public, and composed three sonatas when only thirteen; though it was not until after he had reached his twenty-first year that he began to produce the great works on which his fame rests.

 

Most of the other great Germain composers gave early signs of their musical genius. Winter played in the King of Bavaria's band at ten years old; he produced his first opera, Bellerophon, at twenty-five. Weber, though a scapegrace of a boy, had a marvellous capacity for music. His first six fugues were published at Salzburg when he was only twelve years old. His first opera, Das Waldmddchen, was performed at Vienna, Prague, and St. Petersburg when he was fourteen; and he composed masses, sonatas, violin trios, songs, and other works, until in his thirty-sixth year he produced his opera of Der Freisckutz, which raised his reputation to the greatest height. Mendelssohn tried to play almost before he had learned to speak. He wrote three quartettes for the piano, violin, and violoncello before he was twelve years old. His first opera, The Wedding of Comacho, was produced in his sixteenth year, his sonata in B flat at eighteen, his Midsummer Night's Dream before he was twenty, his Reformation Symphony at twenty-two, and all his other great works by the time that he reached his thirty-eighth year, when he died. Meyerbeer was another musical prodigy. He was an excellent pianist at nine. He began to compose at ten, and at eighteen his first dramatic piece, Jephtha's Daughter, was publicly performed at Munich; but it was not until he had reached his thirty-seventh year that he produced his great work, Robert le Diable, which secured for him a world-wide reputation.

 

In Carlyle's Life of Schiller we find a curious account of Daniel Schubart, a musician, poet, and preacher. He was everything by turns, and nothing long. His life was a series of violent fits, of study, idleness, and debauchery. Yet he was a man of extraordinary powers, an excellent musician, a great preacher, an able newspaper editor. He was by turns feted, imprisoned, and banished. After flickering through life like an ignis fatuus, he died in his fifty-second year, leaving his wife and family destitute. Very different was Franz Schubert, the musical prodigy of Vienna, though his life was no more happy than that of Schubart. While but a child he played the violin, organ, and pianoforte. At eighteen he composed his popular Erl King, scribbling the notes down rapidly after he had read the words twice over. His genius teemed with the loveliest musical fancies, as his published works abundantly prove. He is supposed to have produced upwards of five hundred songs, besides operas, masses, sonatas, symphonies, and quartettes. He died when only thirty-one years old, almost destitute.

 

The musical composers of Italy have exhibited the same precocious signs of genius. Spontini composed his first opera, Puntigli delle Donne, at seventeen, and its complete success spread his fame over Italy. Cherubini composed a mass and motet at thirteen, which excited a great sensation at Florence, his native city. Paisiello composed a comic interlude at fourteen; and he was employed to compose an opera for the principal theatre of Bologna at twenty-two. Cimarosa, the cobbler's son, wrote Baroness Stramba, his first musical work, at nineteen. Paganini played the violin at eight, and composed a sonata at the same age. Rossini's father was a horn-player in the orchestra of a strolling company of players, of which his mother was a second-rate actress and singer. At the age of ten young Rossini played second horn to his father. He afterwards sang in choruses until his voice broke. At eighteen he composed Cambiale di Matrimonio, his first opera; and three years later he composed his Tancredi, which extended his fame throughout Europe.

 

The French composers, Boildieu, Gretry, and Halevy, gave indications of musical genius at an early age. Boildieu wrote his first one-act opera at eighteen. Gretry's songs were sung everywhere when he was twenty. At the same age Halevy obtained the first prize for his cantata of Hermione. Though the English have not as yet been great in musical composition, Purcell composed some of his best anthems while a boy-chorister at Westminster. Crotch was a precocity that broke down. Though he played the organ at four years old, there is scarcely a note of his musical compositions that he did not owe to his predecessors or contemporaries. The two Wesleys were precocious. Charles played the harpsichord at three, when his mother used to tie him to the chair lest he should fall off. Balfe composed his Lover's Mistake when only nine, and Madame Vestris sang the song with great applause in Paul Pry.

 

It is worthy of remark that there has been no instance of musical precocity, or even of musical genius, amongst girls. There may have been some prodigies, but they have come to nothing. There has been no female Bach, Handel, or Mozart. And yet hundreds, of girls are taught music for one boy; nor have they any such obstructions to contend against as boys have occasionally had to encounter. It may also be observed that musical genius seems to be a most consuming one. Though Handel and Rossini lived to be old men, Schubert died at thirty-one, Mozart at thirty-six, Purcell at thirty-seven, Mendelssohn at thirty-eight, and Weber at forty these great musicians seeming to have been consumed by their own fire. Rossini wrote his William Tell at thirty-seven, after which he wrote but little. His Stabat Mater was composed at fifty. He was a wise man, for he knew when to leave off.

 

The lives of painters and sculptors afford many indications of early promise. The greatest instance of all that of Michael Angelo, showed the tendency of his genius. He was sent into the country when a child, tote nursed by the wife of a stone-mason, which led him to say in" after years that he had imbibed a love of the mallet and chisel with his mother's milk. From his early years he displayed an intense passion for drawing. As soon as he could use his hands and fingers, he covered the walls of the stonemason's house with his rough sketches, and when he returned to Florence he continued his practice on the groundfloor of his father's house. When he went to school he made little progress with his books, but he continued indefatigable in the use of his pencil, spending much of his time in haunting the atelieri of the painters. The profession of an artist being then discreditable, his father, who was of an ancient and illustrious family, first employed moral persuasion upon his son Michael, and that failing, personal chastisement. He passionately declared that no son of his house should ever be a miserable stone-cutter. But in vain; the boy would be an artist, and nothing else.

 

The father was at last vanquished, and reluctantly consented to place him as a pupil under Ghirlandaio. That he had by that time made considerable progress in the art is evident by the fact that his master stipulated in the agreement (printed in Vasari's Lives) to pay a monthly remuneration to the father for the services of his son. Young Buonarotti's improvement was so rapid that he not only surpassed the other pupils of his master, but also the master himself. But the sight of the statues in the gardens of Lorenzo de Medici so inflamed his mind that, instead of being a painter, he resolved on devoting himself to sculpture. His progress in this branch of art was so great that in his eighteenth year he executed his basso-relievo of "The Battle of the Centaurs"; in his twentieth year his celebrated statue of "The Sleeping Cupid"; and shortly after his gigantic marble statue of "David." Reverting to the art of painting, he produced some of his greatest works in quick succession. Before he reached his twenty-ninth year he had painted his cartoon, illustrative of an incident in the wars of Pisa, when a body of soldiers, surprised while bathing, started up to repulse the enemy. Benvenuto Cellini has said that he never equalled this work in any of his subsequent productions.

 

Raphael was another wonderfully precocious youth, though his father, unlike Michael Angelo's, gave every encouragement to the cultivation of his genius. He was already eminent in his art at the age of seventeen. He was already eminen in his art at the age of seventeen. He is said to have been inspired at the sight of the great works of Michael Angelo, which adorned the Sistine Chapel at Rome. With the candour natural to a great mind he thanked God that he had been born in the same age with so great an artist, Raphael painted his "School of Athens" in his twenty-filth year, and his "Transfiguration" at thirty-seven, when he died. This picture was carried in the funeral procession to his grave in the Pantheon; though left unfinished, it is considered to be the finest picture in the world.

 

Leonardo da Vinci gave early indications of his remarkable genius. He was skilled in arithmetic, music, and drawing. When a pupil under Verrocchio, he painted an angel in a picture by his master on the "Baptism of Christ”. It was painted so exquisitely that Verrocchio felt his inferiority to his pupil so much, that from that time forth he gave up painting in despair. When Leonardo reached mature years his genius was regarded as almost universal. He was great as a mathematician, an architect and engineer, a musician, and a painter.

 

Guercino, when only ten years old, painted a figure of the Virgin on the front of his father's house, which was greatly admired ; it exhibited the genius of which he afterwards displayed so many proofs. Tintoretto was so skilful with his pencil and brush that his master Titian, becoming jealous, discharged him from his service. But this rebuff had the effect of giving additional vigour to his energies, and he worked with such rapidity that he used to be called Il Furioso, until he came to be recognised as one of the greatest and most prolific painters in Italy.

 

Canova is said to have given indications of his genius at four years old by modelling a lion out of a roll of butter. He began to cut statuary from the marble at fourteen, and went on from one triumph to another. Thorwaldsen carved figure-heads for ships when thirteen working in the shop of his father, who was a wood-carver. At fifteen, he carried off the silver medal of the Academy of Arts at Copenhagen for his bas-relief of "Cupid Reposing"; and at twenty, he gained the gold medal for his drawing of "Heliodorus Driven from the Temple."

 

Claude Joseph Vernet drew skilfully in his fifth year, and before he had reached his twentieth year his pictures were celebrated. Paul Potter painted his greatest picture the famous "Bull" at the Hague when in his twenty-second year, and he dropt his brush before he was twenty-nine. Wilkie could draw before he could read, and he could paint before he could spell correctly. He painted his "Pitiessie Fair," containing about 140 figures, in his nineteenth year. Sir Edwin Landseer painted his "Dogs Fighting" at sixteen; the picture was much admired, and was at once purchased and engraved.

 

Poets also, like musicians and artists, have in many cases given early indications of their genius especially poets of a sensitive, fervid, and impassioned character. The great Italian poets Dante, Tasso, and Alfieri were especially precocious.  Dante showed this when a boy of nine years old by falling passionately in love with Beatrice, a girl of eight; and the passion thus inspired became the pervading principle of his life, and the source of the sublimest conceptions of his muse. Tasso possessed the same delicate, throbbing temperament of genius: he was a poet while but a child. At ten years old, when about to join his father at Rome, he composed a canzone on parting from his mother and sister at Naples. He compared himself to Ascanius escaping from Troy with his father Eneas. At seventeen he composed his Rinaldo in twelve cantos, and by his thirty-first year he had completed his great poem of Jerusalem Delivered, which he began at twenty-one.

 

Metastasio, when a boy of ten, improvised in the streets of Rome; and Goldoni, the comic poet, when only eight, made a sketch of his first play. Goldoni was a sad scapegrace. He repeatedly ran away from school and college to follow a company of strolling players. His relations from time to time dragged him away, and induced him to study law, which he afterwards practised at Pisa with considerable success; but the love of the stage proved too strong for him, and he eventually engaged himself as stage poet, and continued to write comedies for the greater part of his life.

 

But Alfieri whom some have called the Italian Byron was one of the most extraordinary young men of his time. Like many precocious poets he was very delicate during his childhood. He was preternaturally thoughtful and sensitive. When only eight years old, he attempted to poison himself during a fit of melancholy, by eating herbs which he supposed to contain hemlock. But their only effect was to make him sick. He was shut up in his room; after which he was sent in his nightcap to a neighbouring church " Who knows “ said he afterwards," whether I am not indebted to that blessed nightcap for having turned out one of the most truthful of men." The first sight of the ocean, when at Genoa in his sixteenth year, ravished Alfieri with delight. While gazing upon it he became filled with indefinable longings, and first felt that he was a poet. But though rich, he was uneducated, and unable to clothe in words the thoughts which brooded within him. He went back to his books, and next to college; after which he travelled abroad, galloped from town to town, visited London, drowned ennui and melancholy in dissipation, and then, at nineteen, he fell violently in love. Disappointed in not obtaining a return of his affection, he became almost heart-broken, and resolved to die, but his valet saved his life. He recovered, fell in love again, was again disappointed, then took to his room, cut off his hair, and in the solitude to which he condemned himself began to write verses, which eventually became the occupation of his life. His first tragedy, Cleopatra, was produced and acted at Turin when he was twenty-six years old, and in the seven following years he composed fourteen of his greatest tragedies.

 

But it was in poetical composition that the genius of Cervantes first displayed itself. Before he had reached his twentieth year he had composed several romances and ballads, besides a pastoral entitled Felena. Wieland was one of the most precocious of German poets. He read at three years old; Cornelius Nepos in Latin at seven; and meditated the composition of an epic at thirteen. Like other poets, the fact of his falling in love first stimulated him to verse; for at sixteen he wrote his first didactic poem on "Die Vollkommenste Welt”. The genius of Klopstock, too, showed itself equally early. He was at first a rompish boy, then an impetuous student, an enamoured youth, and an admired poet. He conceived and partly executed his Messiah before he had reached his twentieth year, though the three first cantos were not published until four years later. The Messiah excited an extraordinary degree of interest, and gave an immense impetus to German literature.

 

Schiller's mind was passionately drawn to poetry at an early age. The story is told of his having been found one day, during a thunderstorm, perched on the branch of a tree, up which he had climbed, "to see where the lightning had come from, because it was so beautiful," This was very characteristic of the ardent and curious temperament of the boy. Schiller was inspired to poetic composition by reading Klopstock's poem; his mind was turned in the direction of sacred poetry; and by the end of his fourteenth year he had finished an epic poem entitled "Moses." Goethe was a precocious child, so much so that it is recorded that he could write German, French, Italian, Latin, and Greek, before he was eight. At that early age he had anxious thoughts about religion. He devised a form of worship to the "God of Nature," and even burned sacrifices. Music, drawing, natural science, and the study of languages all had their special charms for the wonderful boy. Korner also, the ardent and the brave, met the death which he envied on the field of battle, for his country's liberties at the early age of twenty-two. As a boy, he was sickly and delicate; yet he was possessed by the true poetic faculty. At nineteen he published his first book of poems; and he wrote his last piece, The Song of the Sword, only two hours before the battle in which he fell. Novalis, also, was another German poet of promise, who achieved all that he accomplished by his twenty-ninth year, when he died.

 

Many like instances might be cited of early promise as well as performance on the part of French and English poets. Indeed, the poetic genius depending, as it does, upon peculiar organisation and temperament is that which displays itself the earliest; and if it do not appear before the age of twenty, most probably it will not appear at all. Montaigne has expressed the belief that our souls are adult at that age. "A soul," he says, "that has not by that time given evident earnest of its force and virtue, will never after come to proof. Natural parts and excellences produce that which they have of vigorous and fine within that time or never." This statement, though perhaps put too strongly, is yet in the main true. The mind and soul give promise of their genuine qualities in youth, and though some plants flower late, the greater number flower in the spring and summer of youth, rather than in the autumn and winter of age.

 

Moore, the Irish poet, has observed that nearly all the first-rate comedies, and may of the first-rate tragedies, have been the productions of young men. Lope de Vega and Calderon, two of the most prolific of dramatists, began writing very early the one at twelve, the other at thirteen. The former recited verses of his own composition, which he wrote down and exchanged with his playfellows for prints and toys. At twelve, by his own account, he had not only written short pieces, but composed dramas. His heroic pastoral of Arcadia was published at eighteen. He was with the Spanish Armada, in its assault upon England in 1588. He was then in his twenty-sixth year; and in the course of that perilous and fruitless voyage, he wrote several of his poems. But it was after he returned to Spain and entered the priesthood that he composed the hundreds of plays through which his name has become so famous. Calderon also was a most prolific playwriter in his youth, having added some four hundred dramas to the national stock. His first work, Carro del Cielo, was written at thirteen. He became a priest at fifty, and wrote only sacred pieces after he had entered the Church.

 

These young Spanish dramatists reached their maturity at an early period. Like girls of the South, who reach their puberty early, ripened by the sun, they accomplished all their great works long before they had reached the middle period of life. In northern climes the mental powers ripen spore slowly. Yet Racine wrote his first successful tragedy at twenty-five; and his great work Phedre, which he himself thought to be the supreme effort of his dramatic muse, at thirty-eight. Moliere's education was of the slenderest description; but he overcame the defects of his early training by diligent application; and in his thirty-first year he brought out his first play, L'Etourdi. The whole of his works were produced between then and his fifty-first year, when he died. Voltaire began by satirising the Fathers of the Jesuit College in which he was educated as early as his twelfth year, when Pere le Jay is said to have prophesied of him "qu'il serait en France le coryphee du Deisme." His father wished him to apply himself to the study of law, and believed him to be ruined when he discovered, that he wrote verses and frequented the gay circles of Paris. At twenty, Voltaire was imprisoned in the Bastile for writing satires upon the voluptuous tyrant who then misgoverned France. While there, he corrected his tragedy of Œdipe, which he had written at nineteen, and then he began his Henriade. The tragedy was performed when Voltaire was in his twenty-second year.

 

Kotzebue was another instance of precocious dramatic genius. He made attempts at poetical composition when about six years old, and at seven he wrote a one-page comedy. He used to steal into the Weimar Theatre. Then he could not obtain admittance in the regular way, and hide himself behind the big drum until the performances began. His chief amusement consisted in putting together toy theatres, and working puppet personages on the stage. His first tragedy was privately acted at Jena, where he was a student, in his eighteenth year. A few years later, while living at Revel, he produced, amongst other pieces, the drama so well known in England as The Stranger. Schiller's Robbers was commenced at nineteen, and published at twenty-one. His Fiesco and Court Intriguing and Love were written at twenty-three.

 

Victor Hugo was an equally precocious dramatist. He wrote his first tragedy of Irtamene when fifteen years old. He carried off three successive prizes at the Academy des Jeunes Floraux, and thus won the title of Master in that Institution. At twenty he wrote Bug Jargal, and in the following year his Hans d'Islande and his first volume of Odes et Ballades. The contemporary poets of France were then nearly all young men. "No writer," said the sarcastic critic Moreau, "is now respected in France if he is above eighteen years of age”. Casimir Delavigne began writing poetry at fourteen, and published his first volume at twenty. Lammenais wrote his Paroles d'un Croyant at sixteen. Lamartine's Meditations Poetiques appeared when he was twenty-eight; and the work sold to the exient of 40,000 copies in four years.

 

Among English writers, the same dramatic and poetical precocity has occasionally been observed. Congreve wrote his Incognita, a romance, at nineteen, and The Double Dealer at twenty. Indeed, all his plays were written before he was twenty-five. Wycherley said of himself that he wrote Love in a Wood at nineteen, and The Plain Dealer at twenty; but Macaulay doubts the statement. The first mentioned play was certainly not publicly acted until Wycherley had reached his thirtieth year. Farquhar wrote his Love and a Bottle at twenty, and his Constant Couple at twenty-two. He died at the early age of twenty-nine; and in the last year of his life he wrote his celebrated Beaux' Stratagem. Vanbrugh was a very young man when he sketched out The Relapse and The Provoked Wife.  Otway produced his first tragedy at twenty-four, and his last and greatest, Venice Preserved, at thirty-one. Savage wrote his first comedy, Woman's a Riddle, at eighteen; and his second, Love in a Veil, at twenty. Charles Dibdin brought out his Shepherd's Artifice at Covent Garden, at the age of sixteen; while Sheridan crowned his reputation for dramatic genius by bringing out his perennially interesting School for Scandal at twenty-six.

 

Of English poets, perhaps the very greatest were not precocious, though many gave early indications of genius. We know very little of the youth of Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Spenser, and very little even of their manhood.  So far as is known, Shakespeare wrote his first poem, Venus and Adonis- of which he speaks as "the first heir of my invention" -in his twenty-eighth year; he began writing his plays about the same time, and he probably continued to write them until shortly before his death, in his fifty-second year. Spenser published his first poem, The Shepherd's Calendar, at twenty-six, and Milton composed his masque of Comus at about the same age,  though he had already given indications of his genius, But Cowley was more precocious than Milton, although he never rose to the height of Paradise Lost. At the early age of fifteen Cowley published a volume entitled Poetic Blossoms, containing, amongst other pieces, "The Tragical History of Pyramus and Thisbe", written when he was only twelve years old.

 

Pope also "lisped in numbers," While yet a child, he aimed at being a poet, and formed plans of study. Notwithstanding his perpetual headache and his deformity, the results of ill-health, he contrived to write clever verses. The boy was father of the man; the author of The Dunciad began with satire, and at twelve he was sent home from school for lampooning his tutor. But he had better things in store than satire. Johnson says that Pope wrote his Ode on Solitude in his twelfth year, his Ode on Silence at fourteen, and his Pastorals at sixteen, though they were not published until he was twenty-one. He made his translation of the Iliad between his twenty-fifth and thirtieth year. Joseph Addison, notwithstanding his boyish tricks and his leadership in barrings-out at school, proved a diligent student, and achieved great distinction at Oxford for his Latin verse.

 

The marvellous boy, Chatterton, who "perished in his Pride”' ran his short but brilliant career in seventeen years and nine months. Campbell the poet, has said of him, "No English poet ever equalled Chatterton at sixteen." His famous Ode to Liberty and his exquisite piece, The Minstrel's Song, give perhaps the best idea of the strength and grasp of his genius. But his fierce and defiant spirit, his scornful pride, his defective moral character, and his total misconception of the true conditions of life, ruined him, as they would have ruined a much stronger man; and he poisoned himself almost before he had begun to live.

 

A few more instances of precocious poets. Bishop Heber translated Phædrus into English verse when he was only seven years old; and in his first year at Oxford he gained the prize for Latin verse. Burns, though rather a dull boy, began to rhyme at sixteen. James Montgomery wrote verses at thirteen; he wrote a mock-heroic poem of a thousand lines in his fourteenth year, and began a serious poem to be entitled The World. Rogers used to date his first determination for poetry to the perusal, when a boy, of Beattie's Minstrel. When a young clerk in his father's office, he meditated a call upon Dr. Johnson, but on reaching his house in Bolt Court, his courage forsook him as he was about to lift the knocker. Two years after Johnson's death, in 1786, Rogers, when in his twenty-third year, published his first volume, An Ode to Superstition, and other Poems. Robert Burns published his first volume in the same year.

 

Thomas Moore was another precocious poet. He was a pretty boy; Joseph Atkinson, one of his early friends, spoke of him as an infant Cupid sporting on the bosom of Venus. He wrote love verses to Zelia at thirteen, and began his translation of Anacreon at fourteen. At that age he composed an ode about "Full goblets quaffing” and "Dancing with nymphs to sportive measures, led by a winged train of pleasures” that might have somewhat disconcerted his virtuous mother, the grocer's wife. But Moore worked his way out of luscious poetry; and the Dublin Anacreon at length became famous as the author of the Irish Melodies, Lalla Rookh, The Epicurean, and the Life of Byron.

 

Some precocious young poets have died of consumption at an early age. Henry Kirke White wrote all his poems between thirteen and twenty-one, when he died. Michael Bruce also died at twenty-one, and left behind him many short poems of great promise, which were published posthumously. Robert Pollok, author of The Course of Time, died at twenty-eight; and John Keats, the greatest and brightest genius of them all, published his first volume of poetry at twenty-one and his last at twenty-four, shortly after which he died. Yet Keats was by no means precocious at his earliest years. When a boy at school, he was chiefly distinguished for his terrier-like pugnacity; and his principal amusement was fighting. Though he was a general and insatiable reader, his mind showed no particular bias until he reached his sixteenth year, when the perusal of Spenser´s Faëry Queen set his mind on fire, and reading and writing poetry became the chief employment of his short existence.

 

Shelley was another "bright particular star" of the same epoch. He was precocious in a remarkable degree. When a schoolboy at Eton, and only fifteen years of age, he composed and published a complete romance, out of the proceeds of which he gave a "spread" to his friends. He was early known as "mad Shelley” or "the atheist." At eighteen he published his Queen Mab, to which Leigh Hunt affixed the atheistical notes; at nineteen, he was expelled from University College, Oxford, for his defence of atheism; and between then and his thirtieth year, when he was accidentally drowned, he produced his wonderful series of poems. He was subject to the strangest illusions, and full of eccentricities. At college he was considered to be "cracked." Yet his intelligence was quick and subtle; every fibre of his fragile frame thrilled with sensitiveness; and the productions of his fertile genius were full of musical wildness and imagination, perhaps more than any poems that have ever been written, either before or since his time.

 

Byron was another great and erratic genius, belonging to the same group as Keats and Shelley. Of turbulent and violent temper, he was careless of learning at school, yet he could "fall in love” when not quite eight years old. He was club-footed. While at Aberdeen he was nicknamed “Shauchlin´ Geordie"; yet he strove to distinguish himself in the sports of youth, and, like Keats, he fought his way to supremacy amongst his schoolfellows, "losing," as he himself says, "only one battle out of seven." While at Trinity College, he kept a bear and several bull-dogs, and indulged in many eccentricities. A strange training, one would think, for a poet! Yet, as early as his twelfth year, he had broken out into verse, inspired by the boyish passion which he entertained for a cousin of about his own age. With all his waywardness, Byron was a voracious reader in general literature, and he early endeavoured to embody his thoughts in poetry. In his eighteenth year, while yet at college, he had printed a thin quarto volume of poems for private circulation, and in the following year he published his Hours of Idleness. Stung into revenge by the contemptuous notice of his volume by Henry Brougham in the Edinburgh Review, he published, at twenty-one, his English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Three years later, when twenty-four, the first canto of his Childe Harold appeared. “At twenty-five," said Macaulay, “he found himself on the highest pinnacle of literary fame, with Scott, Wordsworth, Southey, and a crowd of other distinguished writers at his feet. There is scarcely an instance in history of so sudden a rise to so dizzy an eminence." He died in his thirty-seventh year an age that has been fatal to so many men of genius.

 

Of other modern poets it may be summarily mentioned that Campbell wrote his Pleasures of Hope at twenty-two; Southey, his Joan of Arc at nineteen, and Wat Tyler in the following year; Coleridge wrote his first poem at twenty-two, and his Hymn before Sunrise than which poetical literature presents no more remarkable union of sublimity and power at twenty-five. Bulwer Lytton produced his Ismael at fifteen, and Weeds and Wildflowers (a volume of poems) at twenty-one. Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote prose and verse at ten, and published her first volume of poems at seventeen; while Robert Browning, her husband, published his Paracelsus at twenty-three. Alfred Tennyson wrote his first volume of poems at eighteen, while at nineteen he gained the Chancellor's Medal at Cambridge for his poem of Timbuctoo, and at twenty he published his Lyrical Poems, which contained some of his most admired pieces.

 

Thus the tumultuous heat of youth has given birth too many of the noblest things in music, painting, and poetry. The poetic fancy may, however, pale with advancing years. Akenside, late in life, never reached the lustre of invention displayed in his early works. Yet, in many cases, the finest productions have come from the ripeness of age. Goethe was of opinion that the older was the riper poet. Milton had, indeed, written his Comus at twenty-six; but he was upwards of fifty when he began his greatest work. Although the young geniuses above mentioned did great things at an early age, had they lived longer they might have done better. The strength of genius does not depart with youth.

 

Yet the special qualifications which ensure future eminence, usually prove their existence at an early age between seventeen and-two or three-and-twenty. Although the development of poetic power may be slow, if the germs are there they will eventually bud into active life at favourable opportunities. Crabbe and Wordsworth, who ripened late, were early poetasters. Crabbe, when a surgeon's apprentice in Suffolk, filled a drawer with verses, and gained a prize for a poem on Hope, offered by the proprietors of a lady's newspaper. Wordsworth, though left very much to himself when a boy, and of a rather moody and perverse nature, nevertheless began to write verses in the style of Pope in his fourteenth or fifteenth year. Though Shelley sarcastically said of Wordsworth that "he had no more imagination than a pint-pot," he was, nevertheless, like Shakespeare, a poet for all time. He showed none of the precocity which distinguished Shelley, but grew slowly and solidly, like an oak, until he reached his full stature.

 

Scott was anything but a precocious boy. He was pronounced a Greek blockhead by his schoolmaster. Late in life, he said of himself that he had been an incorrigibly idle imp at school. But he was healthy, and eager in all boyish sports. His true genius early displayed itself in his love for old ballads and his extraordinary gift for storytelling. When Walter Scott's father found that the boy had on one occasion been wandering about the country with his friend Clark, resting at intervals in the cottages, and gathering all sorts of odd experience of life, he said to him, "I greatly doubt, sir, you were born for nae better than a gangrel scrape-gut. "Of his gift for story-telling when a boy, Scott himself gives the following account: "In the winter play-hours, when hard exercise was impossible, my tales used to assemble an admiring audience round Lucky Brown´s fireside, and happy was he that could sit next to the inexhaustible narrator." Thus the boy was the forerunner of the man, and his novels were afterwards received by the world with as much delight as his stories had been received by his schoolfellows at Lucky Brown's. "Two boys," says Carlyle, "were once of a class in the Edinburgh Grammar School: John, ever trim, precise, and dux; Walter, ever slovenly, confused, and dolt. In due time, John became Bailie John of Hunter Square, and Walter became Sir Walter Scott of the Universe." Carlyle pithily says that the quickest and completest of all vegetables is the cabbage!

 

The growth of Scott's powers was comparatively slow. He had reached his thirtieth year before he had done anything decisively pointing towards literature. He was thirty (me when the first volume of his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border was published; and he had reached forty-three when he published his first volume of Waverly, though it had been partly written, and then laid aside, nine years before. Nor was Burns, though as fond as Scott of old ballads, by any means precocious; but, like him, he had strong health and a vigorous animal nature. Yet at eighteen or nineteen, as he himself informs us, the marvelous ploughboy' had sketched the outlines of a tragedy.


Nota. Las negritas son nuestras para resaltar artistas y obras. Los vínculos corresponden los que no fueron seleccionados por Martí.

   

Músicos, poetas y pintores

José Martí

 

El mundo tiene más jóvenes que viejos. La mayoría de la humanidad es de jóvenes y niños. La juventud es la edad del crecimiento y del desarrollo, de la actividad y la viveza, de la imaginación y el ímpetu. Cuando no se ha cuidado del corazón y la mente en los años jóvenes, bien se puede temer que la ancianidad sea desolada y triste. Bien dijo el poeta Southey, que los primeros veinte años de la vida son los que tienen más poder en el carácter del hombre. Cada ser humano lleva en sí un hombre ideal, lo mismo que cada trozo de mármol contiene en bruto una estatua tan bella como la que el griego Praxiteles hizo del dios Apolo. La educación empieza con la vida, y no acaba sino con la muerte. El cuerpo es siempre el mismo, y decae con la edad; la mente cambia sin cesar, y se enriquece y perfecciona con los años. Pero las cualidades esenciales del carácter, lo original y enérgico de cada hombre, se deja ver desde la infancia en un acto, en una idea, en una mirada.

 

En el mismo hombre suelen ir unidos un corazón pequeño y un talento grande. Pero todo hombre tiene el deber de cultivar su inteligencia, por respeto a sí propio y al mundo. Lo general es que el hombre no logre en la vida un bienestar permanente sino después de muchos años de esperar con paciencia y de ser bueno, sin cansarse nunca. El ser bueno da gusto, y lo hace a uno fuerte y feliz. “La verdad es -dice el norteamericano Emerson-que la verdadera novela del mundo está en la vida del hombre, y no hay fábula ni romance que recree más la imaginación que la historia de un hombre bravo que ha cumplido con su deber.”

 

Es notable la diferencia de edades en que llegan los  hombres a la fuerza del talento. “Hay algunos -dice el inglés Bacon- que maduran mucho antes de la edad y se van como vienen”, que es lo mismo que dice en su latín elegante el retórico Quintiliano. Eso se ve en muchos niños precoces, que parecen prodigios de sabiduría en sus primeros años, y quedan oscurecidos en cuanto entran en los años mayores.

 

Heinecken, el niño de la antigua ciudad de Lubeck, aprendió de memoria casi toda la Biblia cuando tenía dos años; a los tres años, hablaba latín y francés; a los cuatro ya lo tenían estudiando la historia de la iglesia cristiana, y murió a los cinco. De esa pobre criatura puede decirse lo de Bacon: “El carro de Faetón no anduvo más que un día.”

 

Hay niños que logran salvar la inteligencia de estas exaltaciones de la precocidad, y aumentan en la edad mayor las glorias de su infancia. En los músicos se ve esto con frecuencia, porque la agitación del arte es natural y sana, y el alma que la siente padece más de contenerla que de darle salida.

 

Haendel a los diez años había compuesto un libro de sonatas. Su padre lo quería hacer abogado, y le prohibió tocar un instrumento; pero el niño se procuró a escondidas un clavicordio mudo, y pasaba las noches tocando a oscuras en las teclas sin sonido. El duque de Sajonia Weíssenfels logró, a fuerza de ruegos, que el padre permitiera aprender la música a aquel genio perseverante, y a los dieciséis Haendel había puesto en música el Almira. En veintitrés días compuso su gran obra El Mesías, a los cincuenta y siete años, y cuando murió, a los sesenta y siete, todavía estaba escribiendo óperas y oratorios.

 

Haydn fue casi tan precoz como Haendel, y a los trece años ya había compuesto una misa; pero lo mejor de él, que es la Creación, lo escribió cuando tenía sesenta y cinco.  A Sebastián Bach le fue casi tan difícil como a Haendel aprender la primera música, porque su hermano mayor, el organista Cristóbal, tenía celos de él, y le escondió el libro donde estaban las mejores piezas de los maestros del clavicordio. Pero Sebastián encontró el libro en una alacena, se lo llevó a su cuarto, y empezó a copiarlo a deshoras de la noche, a la luz del cielo, que en verano es muy claro, o a la luz de la luna. Su hermano lo descubrió, y tuvo la crueldad de llevarse el libro y la copia, lo que de nada le valió, porque a los dieciocho años ya estaba Sebastián de músico en la corte famosa de Weimar, y no tenia como organista más rival que Haendel.

 

Pero de todos los niños prodigiosos en el arte de la música, el más célebre es Mozart. No parecía que necesitaba de maestros para aprender. A los cuatro años, cuando aún no sabía escribir, ya componía tonadas; a los seis arregló un concierto para piano, y a los doce ya no tenia igual como pianista, y compuso la Finta Semplice, que fue su primera ópera. Aquellos maestros serios no sabían cómo entender a un niño que improvisaba fugas dificilísimas sobre un tema desconocido, y se ponía enseguida a jugar a caballito con el bastón de su padre. El padre anduvo enseñándolo por las principales ciudades de Europa, vestido como un príncipe, en su casaquita color de pulga, sus polainas de terciopelo, sus zapatos de hebilla, y el pelo largo y rizado, atado por detrás como las pelucas. El padre no se cuidaba de la salud del pianista pigmeo, que no era buena, sino de sacar de él cuánto dinero podía. Pero a Mozart lo salvaba su carácter alegre; porque era un maestro en música, pero un niño en todo lo demás. A los catorce años compuso su ópera de Mitrídates, que se representó veinte noches seguidas; a los treinta y seis, en su cama de moribundo, consumido por la agitación de su vida y el trabajo desordenado, compuso el Requiem, que es una de sus obras más perfectas.

 

El padre de Beethoven quería hacer de él una maravilla, y le enseñó a fuerza de porrazos y penitencias tanta música, que a los trece años el niño tocaba en público y había compuesto tres sonatas. Pero hasta los veintiuno no empezó a producir sus obras sublimes.  Weber, que era un muchacho muy travieso, publicó a los doce sus seis primeras fugas, y a los catorce compuso su ópera Las Ninfas del Bosque: la famosísima del Cazador la compuso a los treinta y seis.  Mendelssohn aprendió a tocar antes que a hablar, y a los doce años ya había escrito tres cuartetos para piano, violines y contrabajo: dieciséis años cumplía cuando acabó su primera ópera Las Bodas de Camacho; a los dieciocho escribió su sonata en si bemol; antes de los veinte compuso su Sueño de una Noche de Verano; a los veintidós su Sinfonía de Reforma, y no cesó de escribir obras profundas y dificilísimas hasta los treinta y ocho, que murió. Meyerbeer era a los nueve pianista excelente, y a los dieciocho puso en el teatro de Munich su primera pieza La Hija de Jephté; pero hasta los treinta y siete no ganó fama con su Roberto el Diablo.

 

El inglés Carlyle habla en su Vida del Poeta Schiller de un Daniel Schubart, que era poeta, músico y predicador, y a derechas no era nada. Todo lo hacía por espasmos y se cansaba de todo, de sus estudios, de su pereza y de sus desórdenes. Era hombre de mucha capacidad, notable como músico; como predicador, muy elocuente; y hábil periodista. A los cincuenta y dos años murió, y su mujer e hijo quedaron en la miseria. Pero Franz Schubert, el niño maravilloso de Viena, vivió de otro modo, aunque no fue mucho más feliz. Tocaba el violín cuando no era más alto que él lo mismo que el piano y el órgano. Con leer una vez una canción, tenía bastante para ponerla en música exquisita, que parece de sueño y de capricho, y como si fuera un aire de colores. Escribió más de quinientas melodías, a más de óperas, misas, sonatas, sinfonías y cuartetos. Murió pobre a los treinta y un años.

 

Entre los músicos de Italia se ha visto la misma precocidad. Cimarosa, hijo de un zapatero remendón, era autor a los diecinueve de La Baronesa de Stramba. A los ocho tocaba Paganini en el violín una sonata suya. El padre de Rossini tocaba el trombón en una compañía de cómicos ambulantes, en que la madre iba de cantatriz. A los diez años Rossini iba con su padre de segundo; luego cantó en los coros hasta que se quedó sin voz; y a los veintiún años era el autor famoso de la ópera Tancredo.

 

Entre los pintores y escultores han sido muchos los que se han revelado en la niñez. El más glorioso de todos es Miguel Ángel. Cuando nació lo mandaron al campo a criarse con la mujer de un picapedrero, por lo que decía él después que había bebido el amor de la escultura con la leche de la madre. En cuanto pudo manejar un lápiz le llenó las paredes al picapedrero de dibujos, y cuando volvió a Florencia, cubría de gigantes y leones el suelo de la casa de su padre. En la escuela no adelantaba mucho con los libros, ni dejaba el lápiz de la mano; y había que ir a sacarlo por fuerza de casa de los pintores. La pintura y la escultura eran entonces oficios bajos, y el padre, que venía de familia noble, gastó en vano razones y golpes para convencer a su hijo de que no debía ser un miserable cortapiedras, Pero cortapiedras quería ser el hijo, y nada más. Cedió el padre al fin, y lo puso de alumno en el taller del pintor Ghirlandaio, quien halló tan adelantado al aprendiz que convino en pagarle un tanto por mes. Al poco tiempo el aprendiz pintaba mejor que el maestro; pero vio las estatuas de los jardines célebres de Lorenzo de Médicis, y cambió entusiasmado los colores por el cincel. Adelantó con tanta rapidez en la escultura que a los dieciocho años admiraba Florencia su bajorrelieve de la Batalla de los Centauros; a los veinte hizo el Amor Dormido, y poco después su colosal estatua de David. Pintó luego, uno tras otro, sus cuadros terribles y magníficos. Benvenuto Cellini, aquel genio creador en el arte de ornamentar, dice que ningún cuadro de Miguel Ángel vale tanto como el que pintó a los veintinueve que unos soldados de Pisa, sorprendidos en el baño por sus enemigos, salen del agua a arremeter contra ellos.

 

La precocidad de Rafael fue también asombrosa, aunque su padre no se le oponía, sino le celebraba su pasión por el arte. A los diecisiete años ya era pintor eminente. Cuentan que se llenó de admiración al ver las obras grandiosas de Miguel Ángel en la Capilla Sixtina, y que dio en voz alta gracias a Dios por haber nacido en el mismo siglo de aquel genio extraordinario. Rafael pintó su Escuela de Atenas a los veinticinco años y su obra Transfiguración a los treinta y siete. Estaba acabándola cuando murió, y el pueblo romano llevó la pintura al Panteón, el día de los funerales. Hay quien piensa que La Transfiguración de Rafael, incompleta como está, es el cuadro más bello del mundo.

 

Leonardo de Vinci sobresalió desde la niñez en las matemáticas, la música y el dibujo. En un cuadro de su maestro Verrocchio pintó un ángel de tanta hermosura que el maestro, desconsolado de verse inferior al discípulo, dejó para siempre su arte. Cuando Leonardo llegó a los años mayores era la admiración del mundo, por su poder como arquitecto e ingeniero, y como músico y pintor. Guercino a los diez años adornó con una virgen de fino dibujo la fachada de su casa. Tintoreto era un discípulo tan aventajado que su maestro Tiziano se enceló de él y lo despidió de su servicio. El desaire le dio ánimo en vez de acobardarlo, y siguió pintando tan de prisa que le decían "el furioso". Canova, el escultor, hizo a los cuatro años un león de un pan de mantequilla. El dinamarqués Thorwaldsen tallaba, a los trece, mascarones para los barcos en el taller de su padre, que era escultor en madera; y a los quince ganó la medalla en Copenhague por su bajorrelieve del Amor en Reposo.

 

Los poetas también suelen dar pronto muestras de su vocación, sobre todo los de alma inquieta, sensible y apasionada. Dante a los nueve años escribía versos a la niña de ocho años de que habla en su Vida Nueva. A los diez años lamentó Tasso en verso su separación de su madre y hermana, y se comparó al triste Ascanio cuando huía de Troya con su padre Eneas a cuestas; a los treinta y un años puso las últimas octavas a su poema de la Jerusalén, que empezó a los veinticinco.

 

De diez años andaba Metastasio improvisando por las calles de Roma; y Goldoni, que era muy revoltoso, compuso a los ocho su primera comedia. Muchas veces se escapó Goldoni de la escuela para irse detrás de los cómicos ambulantes. Su familia logró que estudiase leyes, y en pocos años ganó fama de excelente abogado, pero la vocación natural pudo más en él, y dejó el foro para hacerse el poeta famoso de los comediantes.

 

Alfieri demostró cualidades extraordinarias desde la juventud. De niño era muy endeble, como muchos poetas precoces, y en extremo meditabundo y sensible. A los ocho años se quiso envenenar, en un arrebato de tristeza, con unas yerbas que le parecían de cicuta; pero las yerbas sólo le sirvieron de purgante. Lo encerraron en su cuarto y lo hicieron ir a la iglesia en penitencia, con su gorro de dormir. Cuando vio el mar por primera vez, tuvo deseos misteriosos, y conoció que era poeta. Sus padres ricos no se habían cuidado de educarlo bien, y no pudo poner en palabras las ideas que le hervían en la mente. Estudió, viajó, vivió sin orden, se enamoró con frenesí. Su amada no lo quiso y él resolvió morir, pero un criado le salvó la vida. Se curó, se volvió a enamorar, volvió la novia a desdeñarlo, se encerró en su cuarto, se cortó el pelo de raíz, y en su soledad forzosa empezó a escribir versos. Tenía veintiséis años cuando se representó su tragedia Cleopatra: en siete años compuso catorce tragedias.

Cervantes empezó a escribir en verso, y no tenía todo el bigote cuando ya había escrito sus pastorales y canciones a la moda italiana. Wieland, el poeta alemán, leía de corrido a los tres años, a los siete traducía del latín a Cornelio Nepote, y a los dieciséis escribió su primer poema didáctico de El Mundo Perfecto. Klopstock, que desde niño fue impetuoso y apasionado, comenzó a escribir su poema de la Mesíada a los veinte años.

 

Schiller nació con la pasión por la poesía. Cuentan que un día de tempestad lo encontraron encaramado en un árbol adonde se había subido "para ver de dónde venía el rayo, ¡porque era tan hermoso!" Schiller leyó la Mesíada a los catorce años, y se puso a componer un poema sacro sobre Moisés.  De Goethe se dice que antes de cumplir los ocho años escribía en alemán, en francés, en italiano, en latín y en griego, y pensaba tanto en las cosas de la religión que imaginó un gran "Dios de la naturaleza", y le encendía hogares en señal de adoración. Con el mismo afán estudiaba la música y el dibujo, y toda especie de ciencias. El bravo poeta Koerner murió a los veinte años corno quería él morir, defendiendo a su patria. Era enfermizo de niño, pero nada contuvo su amor por las ideas nobles que se celebran en los versos. Dos horas antes de morir escribió El Canto de la Espada.

 

Tomás Moore, el poeta de las Melodías Irlandesas, dice que casi todas las comedias buenas y muchas de las tragedias famosas han sido obras de la juventud. Lope de Vega y Calderón, que son los que más han escrito para el teatro, empezaron muy temprano, uno a los doce años y otro a los trece. Lope cambiaba sus versos con sus condiscípulos por juguetes y láminas, y a los doce años ya había compuesto dramas y comedias. A los dieciocho publicó su poema de la Arcadia, con pastores por héroes. A los veintiséis iba en un barco de la armada española, cuando el asalto a Inglaterra, y en el viaje escribió varios poemas. Pero los centenares de comedias que lo han hecho célebre los escribió después de su vuelta a España, siendo ya sacerdote. Calderón no escribió menos de cuatrocientos dramas. A los trece años compuso su primera obra El Carro del Cielo. A los cincuenta se hizo sacerdote, como Lope, y ya no escribió más que piezas sagradas.

 

Estos poetas españoles escribieron sus obras principales antes de llegar a los años de la madurez. Entre los poetas de las tierras del Norte la inteligencia anda mucho más despacio.  Moliére tuvo que educarse por sí mismo; pero a los treinta y un años ya había escrito El Atolondrado. Voltaire a los doce escribía sátiras contra los padres jesuitas del colegio en que se estaba educando: su padre quería que estudiase leyes, y se desesperó cuando supo que el hijo andaba recitando versos entre la gente alegre de París: a los veinte años estaba Voltaire preso en la Bastilla por sus versos burlescos contra el rey vicioso que gobernaba en Francia: en la prisión corrigió su tragedia de Edipo, y comenzó su poema la Henriada.

 

El alemán Kotzebue fue otro genio dramático precoz. A los siete años escribió una comedia en verso, de una página. Entraba como podía en el teatro de Weimar, y cuando no tenía con qué pagar se escondía detrás del bombo hasta que empezaba la representación. Su mayor gusto era andar con teatros de juguete y mover a los muñecos en la escena. A los dieciocho años se representó su primera tragedia en un teatro de amigos.

 

Víctor Hugo no tenía más que quince años cuando escribió su tragedia Irtamene. Ganó tres premios seguidos en los juegos florales; a los veinte escribió Bug Jargal, y un año después su novela Hans de Islandia, y sus primeras Odas y Baladas. Casi todos los poetas franceses de su tiempo eran muy jóvenes. "En Francia", decía en burla el crítico Moreau, "ya no hay quien respete a un escritor si tiene más de dieciocho años".

 

El inglés Congreve escribió a los diecinueve su novela Incógnita, y todas sus comedias antes de los veinticinco. A Sheridan lo llamaba su maestro "burro incorregible"; pero a los veintiséis años había escrito su Escuela del Escándalo. Entre los poetas ingleses de la antigüedad hubo muy pocos precoces. Se sabe poco de Chaucer, Shakespeare y Spenser.  El mismo Shakespeare llama "primogénito de su invención" al poema Venus y Adonis, que compuso a los veintiocho años. Milton tendría veintiséis años cuando escribió su Comus. Pero Cowley escribía versos mitológicos a los doce. Pope "empezó a hablar en versos": su salud era mísera y su cuerpo deforme, pero por más que le doliera la cabeza, los versos le salían muchos y buenos. El que había de idear La Borricada volvió un día a su casa echado de la escuela por una sátira que escribió contra el maestro. Samuel Johnson dice que Pope escribió su oda a La Soledad a los doce años, y sus Pastorales a los dieciséis: de los veinticinco a los treinta, tradujo la Ilíada. El infeliz Chatterton logró engañar con una maravillosa falsificación literaria a los eruditos más famosos de su tiempo: rebosan genio la oda de Chatterton a la Libertad y su Canto del Bardo. Pero era fiero y arrogante, de carácter descompuesto y defectuoso, y rebelde contra las leyes de la vida. Murió antes de haber comenzado a vivir.

 

Robert Burns, el poeta escocés, escribía ya a los dieciséis años sus encantadoras canciones montañesas.  El irlandés Moore componía a los trece, versos buenos a su Celia famosa, y a los catorce había empezado a traducir del griego a Anacreonte. En su casa no sabían qué significaban aquellas ninfas, aquellos placeres alados, y aquellas canciones al vino. Moore se libró pronto de estos modelos peligrosos, y alcanzó fama mejor con los versos ricos de su Lalla Rookh y la prosa ejemplar de su Vida de Byron.

 

Keats, el más grande de los poetas jóvenes de Inglaterra, murió a los veinticuatro años, ya célebre. Pero nadie hubiera podido decir en su niñez que había de ser ilustre por su genio poético aquel estudiantuelo feroz que andaba siempre de peleas y puñetazos. Es verdad que leía sin cesar; aunque no pareció revelársele la vocación hasta que leyó a los dieciséis años la Reina Encantada de Spenser: desde entonces sólo vivió para los versos.

 

Shelley sí fue precocísimo. Cuando estudiaba en Eton, a los quince años publicó una novela y dio un banquete a sus amigos con la ganancia de la venta. Era tan original y rebelde que todos le decían "el ateo Shelley", o "el loco Shelley". A los dieciocho publicó su poema de la Reina Mab, y a los diecinueve lo echaron del colegio por el atrevimiento con que defendió sus doctrinas religiosas; a los treinta años murió ahogado, con un tomo de versos de Keats en el bolsillo. Maravillosa es la poesía de Shelley por la música del verso, la elegancia de la construcción y la profundidad de las ideas. Era un manojo de nervios siempre vibrantes, y tenía tales ilusiones y rarezas que sus condiscípulos lo tenían por destornillado; pero su inteligencia fue vivísima y sutil, su cuerpo frágil se estremecía con las más delicadas emociones, y sus versos son de incomparable hermosura.

 

Byron fue otro genio extraordinario y errante de la misma época de Shelley y de Keats. Desde la escuela se le conoció el carácter turbulento y arrebatado. De los libros se cuidaba poco; pero antes de los ocho años ya sufría de penas de hombre. Tenía una pierna más corta que la otra, aunque eso no le quitaba los bríos, y se hizo el dueño de la escuela a fuerza de puños, como Keats: él mismo cuenta que de siete batallas perdía una. Cuando estaba en Cambridge de estudiante, tenía en su casa un oso y varios perros de presa, y cada día contaban de él una historia escandalosa: aquél era sin embargo el niño sensible que a los doce años había celebrado en versos sentidos a una prima suya. Leía con afán todos los libros de literatura, y a los dieciocho años publicó para sus amigos su primer libro de versos: Horas de Ocio. La Revista de Edimburgo habló del libro con desdén, y Byron contestó con su célebre sátira sobre los Poetas Ingleses y los Críticos de Escocia. Cumplía los veinticuatro cuando salió al público el primer canto de su poema Childe Harold. "A los veinticinco años", dice Macaulay, "se vio a Byron en la cima de la gloria literaria, con todos los ingleses famosos de la época a sus pies. Byron era ya más célebre que Scott, Wordsworth y Southey. Apenas hay ejemplo de un ascenso tan rápido a tan vertiginosa eminencia". Murió a los treinta y siete años, edad fatal para tantos hombres de genio.

 

Coleridge escribió a los veinticinco su Himno del Amanecer, donde se ven en unión completa la sublimidad y la energía.  Bulwer Lytton tenía hecho a los quince su Ismael. A los diecisiete había publicado su primer tomo la poetisa Barrett Browning, que desde los diez escribía en verso y prosa. Robert Browning, su marido, publicó el Paracelso a los veintitrés.  A los veinte había escrito Tennyson algunas de las poesías melodiosas que han hecho ilustre su nombre. Se ve, pues, que en el fuego tumultuoso de la juventud han nacido muchas de las obras más nobles de la música, la pintura y la poesía. Suele el genio poético decaer con los años, aunque Goethe dice que con la edad se va haciendo mejor el poeta. Es seguro que si no hubieran muerto tan temprano, los poetas precoces habrían imaginado después obras más perfectas que las de su juventud. La fuerza del genio no se acaba con la juventud.

 

Pero las dotes especiales que hacen más tarde ilustres a los hombres se revelan casi siempre entre los diecisiete y veintitrés años. Puede irse desarrollando poco a poco el talento poético; pero el que es poeta de veras, siempre lo mostrará de algún modo.  Crabbe y Wordsworth, que descubrieron el genio tarde, escribían versos desde la niñez. Crabbe llenó de versos toda una gaveta, cuando estaba de aprendiz de cirujano; y Wordsworth, que era agrio y melancólico de niño, empezó a hacer cuartetas heroicas a los catorce. Shelley dice de Wordsworth que "no tenía más imaginación que un cacharro", lo que no quita que sea Wordsworth un poeta inmortal. No fue precoz como Shelley; pero creció despacio y con firmeza, como un roble, hasta que llegó a su majestuosa altura.

 

Walter Scott tampoco fue precoz de niño. Su maestro dijo que no tenía cabeza para el griego, y él mismo cuenta que fue de muchacho muy travieso y holgazán; pero gozaba de mucha salud, y era gran amigo de los juegos de su edad. En lo primero en que se le vio el genio fue en su gusto por las baladas antiguas, y en su facilidad extraordinaria para inventar historias. Cuando su padre supo que había estado vagando por el país con su camarada Clark, metiéndose por todas partes, y posando en las casas de los campesinos, le dijo: -"¡Dudo mucho, señor, de que sirva Ud. más que para cola de caballo!". De su facilidad para los cuentos, el mismo Scott dice que en las horas de ocio de los inviernos, cuando no tenían modo de estar al aire libre, mantenía muchas horas maravillados con sus narraciones a sus compañeros de escuela, que se peleaban por sentarse cerca del que les decía aquellas historias lindas que no acababan nunca.

 

Dice Carlyle que en una clase de la escuela de gramática de Edimburgo había dos muchachos: "John, siempre hecho un brinquillo, correcto y ducal; Walter, siempre desarreglado, borrico y tartamudo. Con el correr de los años, John llegó a ser el regidor John, de un barrio infeliz, y Walter fue Sir Walter Scott, de todo el universo". Dice Carlyle, con mucho seso, que la legumbre más precoz y completa es la col. A los treinta años no se podía decir de seguro que Scott tuviera genio para la literatura. A los treinta y uno publicó su primer tomo del Cancionero de Escocia, y no imprimió su novela Waverley hasta los cuarenta y tres, aunque la tenía escrita nueve años antes.

 

 

Acerca de la edición crítica  de Músicos, poetas y pintores

 

Alejandro Herrera Moreno

 

En el número de agosto de La Edad de Oro aparece un artículo de ocho páginas y cuatro láminas dedicado a grandes figuras de la cultura universal, anunciado por Martí desde el número de julio como: “Niños  famosos: de Samuel Smiles, con retratos" y que en el propio número de agosto sale bajo el título de Músicos, poetas y pintores, con la siguiente sinopsis: "Anécdotas de la vida de los hombres famosos, traducidas del último libro de Samuel Smiles, con cuatro retratos: Miguel Ángel, Mozart, Moliére y Robert Burns, el poeta escocés."  Niños Famosos, como lo menciona Martí, hace referencia al Capítulo III Great young men (Grandes jóvenes), del libro de Samuel Smiles Life and labour (Vida y Trabajo). Dicho capítulo tiene un total de cincuenta páginas dedicadas a la precocidad infantil y juvenil ejemplificada con datos biográficos de músicos, pintores, escultores, poetas, escritores dramáticos, novelistas, científicos, astrónomos, matemáticos, naturalistas, anatomistas, lingüistas, periodistas y militares. Sin embargo, Martí no toma el contenido completo de Grandes jóvenes sino que se concentra solo en sus primeras veinte páginas, donde se tratan los músicos, poetas y pintores que dan nombre a su ensayo para los niños. La presente página ofrece la primera edición crítica en línea de Músicos, poetas y pintores como fruto del trabajo del Proyecto La Edad de Oro universo de cultura de la Fundación Cultural Enrique Loynaz .

 

Como toda edición crítica es nuestro objetivo  presentar dicho artículo, analizarlo e ir ofreciendo notas que esclarezcan aspectos claves de su contenido y contribuyan a su mejor comprensión temática. Al respecto hemos tomando como base nuestro ensayo comparativo (1). Sin embargo, no debemos olvidar que Músicos, poetas y pintores es una traducción, por lo que la mejor forma de evaluarlo objetivamente es colocándolo al lado del original inglés que constituyó su fuente original. En tal sentido, nuestra edición se diseñó de forma tal que en los dos primeros cuadros superiores con barras desplazables se ofrecen ambas versiones lo que brinda la posibilidad  de  que cada texto de Músicos, poetas y pintores pueda ser contrapuesto directamente con el texto equivalente de Great young men y el interesado valore por sí mismo –además de los aciertos de la traducción- los criterios selectivos del Maestro, sus estilos adaptativos y sus propias valoraciones sobre el tema en general y sobre los autores y obras mencionadas en particular. Para ello hemos empleado una reimpresión de 1931 del original de 1887 (que posiblemente fue el que tuvo Martí en sus manos) de la Editora John Murray de Londres. En esta versión hemos puesto vínculos que permiten leer las biografías de los artistas que Martí no seleccionó, de manera que igualmente puedan ser valorados por el interesado.

 

Además de mostrar en los cuadros superiores ambas versiones juntas se ha diseñado un cuadro inferior con textos e imágenes, donde el interesado podrá seleccionar el personaje de Músicos, poetas y pintores de su interés y acceder a una ficha ilustrada de cada personaje, que incluye: nombre, actividad, nacionalidad, época, obras citadas -directa o indirectamente- en La Edad de Oro, una valoración sobre lo que del personaje dijo Martí en sus escritos y referencias a investigaciones relevantes al personaje y su obra. Desde la ficha se accede interactivamente, a archivos de texto o imágenes en formato electrónico  que contienen biografías y obras. Es nuestro propósito convertir esta edición crítica en un material de referencia para todo el que desee acercarse a Músicos, poetas y pintores para investigarlo desde cualquier enfoque, deslindando los valores originales de los añadidos, aspecto sumamente importante a veces olvidado, al abordar el estudio de las versiones extranjeras en La Edad de Oro.


(1) Herrera, A. 1989. Análisis comparativo de Niños Famosos de Samuel Smiles y Músicos, Poetas y Pintores de José Martí. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, La Habana, Cuba, 12: 235-247.

Alfieri

Nombre completo: Vittorio Alfieri

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta trágico italiano

Época:  1749-1803

Obra citada directamente: Cleopatra

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles había escrito: But Alfieri whom some have called the Italian Byron was one of the most extraordinary young men of his time. Like many precocious poets he was very delicate during his childhood. He was preternaturally thoughtful and sensitive. When only eight years old, he attempted to poison himself during a fit of melancholy, by eating herbs which he supposed to contain hemlock. But their only effect was to make him sick. He was shut up in his room; after which he was sent in his nightcap to a neighbouring church "Who knows,” said he afterwards, "whether I am not indebted to that blessed nightcap for having turned out one of the most truthful of men." The first sight of the ocean, when at Genoa in his sixteenth year, ravished Alfieri with delight. While gazing upon it he became filled with indefinable longings, and first felt that he was a poet. But though rich, he was uneducated, and unable to clothe in words the thoughts which brooded within him. He went back to his books, and next to college; after which he travelled abroad, galloped from town to town, visited London, drowned ennui and melancholy in dissipation, and then, at nineteen, he fell violently in love. Disappointed in not obtaining a return of his affection, he became almost heart-broken, and resolved to die, but his valet saved his life. He recovered, fell in love again, was again disappointed, then took to his room, cut off his hair, and in the solitude to which he condemned himself began to write verses, which eventually became the occupation of his life. His first tragedy, Cleopatra, was produced and acted at Turin when he was twenty-six years old, and in the seven following years he composed fourteen of his greatest tragedies.” (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles,  Martí escribe: “Alfieri demostró cualidades extraordinarias desde la juventud. De niño era muy endeble, como muchos poetas precoces, y en extremo meditabundo y sensible. A los ocho años se quiso envenenar, en un arrebato de tristeza, con unas yerbas que le parecían de cicuta; pero las yerbas sólo le sirvieron de purgante. Lo encerraron en su cuarto y lo hicieron ir a la iglesia en penitencia, con su gorro de dormir. Cuando vio el mar por primera vez, tuvo deseos misteriosos, y conoció que era poeta. Sus padres ricos no se habían cuidado de educarlo bien, y no pudo poner en palabras las ideas que le hervían en la mente. Estudió, viajó, vivió sin orden, se enamoró con frenesí. Su amada no lo quiso y él resolvió morir, pero un criado le salvó la vida. Se curó, se volvió a enamorar, volvió la novia a desdeñarlo, se encerró en su cuarto, se cortó el pelo de raíz, y en su soledad forzosa empezó a escribir versos. Tenía veintiséis años cuando se representó su tragedia Cleopatra: en siete años compuso catorce tragedias.” (18:395). Comparativamente con el texto de Smiles la traducción martiana es un verdadero alarde de síntesis para darnos en ráfagas lo esencial de la personalidad de Alfieri. En uno de los cuadernos de apuntes de Martí aparece Alfieri en una lista de traductores, por su versión en verso de La Eneida de Virgilio (21:224) y una referencia al personaje Virginio de su tragedia Virginia. (13:294)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84-85. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Vittorio Alfieri

Cuadro de François-Xavier Fabre, Florencia, 1793

Anacreonte

Nombre completo: Anacreonte

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta griego

Época: 572-485 AC

Obras citadas:  No aplica

Comentarios: En Great young men la figura de Anacreonte aparece  como parte de la reseña de Thomas Moore, cuando Smiles dice: "He wrote love verses to Zelia at thirteen, and began his translation of Anacreon at fourteen. At that age he composed an ode about "Full goblets quaffing," and "Dancing with nymphs to sportive measures, led by a winged train of pleasures," that might have somewhat disconcerted his virtuous mother, the grocer's wife." (1)  En su Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce: “El irlandés Moore componía a los trece versos buenos a su Celia famosa, y a los catorce había  empezado a traducir del griego a Anacreonte. En su casa no sabían qué significaban aquellas ninfas, aquellos placeres alados, y aquellas canciones al vino.” (18:398) Hay algunas referencias a este personaje en la obra martiana. En El Federalista de México el 11 de febrero de 1876 en su artículo La poesía hace alusión a este poeta griego cuando dice: "Dejan los hombres culminantes, huellas sumamente peligrosas, por esa especie de solicitud misteriosa que tienen a la imitación. Polvo de huesos y sedimento de humus habrán sido ya muchas veces los restos de Anacreonte y de Virgilio, y aún hay en la expresión rimada del sentimiento poético, tintes de aquel afecto sensual, de aquella perezosa molicie, de aquel picaresco ingenio o de aquellos conceptos sentenciosos de los dos clásicos." (6:367-368) En su diario de Montecristi a Cabo Haitiano el 2 de marzo de 1895, comentando el libro Les Meres Chretiennes des Contemporains Illustres, dice: "Por donde dice “Madame Moore” abro el libro. Madame Moore, la madre de Tomás Moore, a cuya “Betsy” admiro, leal y leve; y siempre fiel, y madre verdadera, a su esposo danzarín y vano. Como muy santa madre da el libro a la de Moore, y lo de ella lo prueba por la vida del hijo. Pero no dice lo que es: que por donde el hijo cristiano comenzó, fue por la traducción picante y feliz de las odas de Anacreonte." (19:204) En su cuaderno de apuntes número dos está esta nota: "A si mismo. Las mujeres dicen: Oh Anacreonte eres viejo. Habiendo tomado espejo, mira los cabellos ciertamente no ya existentes, y la frente de ti suave. Mas yo en verdad no sé, en cuanto a los cabellos, si están o si marcharon. Sólo sé esto: que el jugar suavemente conviene al anciano tanto más cuanto más cerca están las rosas de la muerte." (21:91)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 91. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Anacreonte

Apolo

Nombre completo: Apolo

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Mitología griega

Época: No aplica

Obras citadas:  No aplica

Comentarios: En Músicos, poetas y pintores nuevamente aparece la figura de Apolo cuando Martí, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles, menciona  la  estatua "... que el griego Praxiteles hizo del dios Apolo...” (18:390) modificando la versión de Smiles que había escrito: “Each human being contains the ideal of a perfect man, according to the type in which the Creator has fashioned him, just as the block of marble contains the image of an Apollo, to be fashioned by the sculptor into a perfect statue.” (1) Hay varias referencias al personaje de Apolo y a sus representaciones artísticas en toda la la obra martiana. En su artículo sobre el centenario de Washington escrito en Nueva York en abril de 1889, emplea la frase: “…con gracia de Apolo.” (13:507) Para profundizar en este personaje el interesado también puede acudir a la Edición Crítica del Centro de Estudios Martianos del artículo La Ilíada de Homero, donde también se menciona la figura de Apolo. (2)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 75. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Centro de Estudios Martianos 2004. Jose Martí. La Ilíada de Homero. Edición Crítica., 101 pp.   

Copia del Apolo de Praxíteles

en el Museo del Louvre

Ascanio         

Nombre completo: Ascanio

Actividad/ Nacionalidad:  Mitología griega y romana

Época: No aplica            

Obras citadas: No aplica

Comentarios: Ascanio aparece en Great young men, como parte de la reseña de Torquato Tasso, Samuel Smiles escribió: "At ten years old, when about to join his father at Rome, he composed a canzone on parting from his mother and sister at Naples. He compared himself to Ascanius escaping from Troy with his father Eneas." (1) Martí sintetiza y traduce el contenido de Smiles: "A los diez años lamentó Tasso en verso su separación de su madre y hermana, y se comparó al triste Ascanio cuando huía de Troya con su padre Eneas a cuestas...” (18:395) Este pasaje alude a la salida de Ascanio tras la caída de Troya, conducido por su padre Eneas (junto con su abuelo Anquises) a las afueras de la ciudad para ir en busca de un mejor destino. En la traducción Martí agrega que Ascanio iba con su padre a cuestas, lo cual es improbable pues se trataba de un niño, quien llevaba a cuestas su padre Anquises -anciano y enfermo- era el propio Eneas. La Galería Borghese, en Roma exhibe una escultura de mármol conocida como: Eneas, Anquises y Ascanio, realizada por Gian Lorenzo Bernini entre 1618 y 1619. La escultura –de la cual se presentan una imagen adjunta-  representa a Eneas huyendo de la ciudad de Troya llevando a su anciano padre, Anquises sobre sus hombros, y a su hijo Ascanio llevando el sagrado fuego del hogar.   


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.       

Eneas, Anquises y Ascanio 

estatua realizada por Gian Lorenzo Bernini  (1618 - 1619)

Bach

Nombre completo: Johann Sebastian Bach

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Músico alemán

Época: 1685-1750

Obras citadas:  Ninguna

Comentarios: Bach aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe: “John Sebastian Bach had almost as many difficulties to encounter as Handel in acquiring a knowledge of music. His elder brother, John Christopher, the organist, was jealous of him, and hid away a volume containing a collection of pieces by the best harpsichord composers. But Sebastian found the book in a cupboard, where it had been locked up; carried it to his room; sat up at night to copy it without a candle by the light only of the summer night, and sometimes of the moon. His brother at last discovered the secret work, and cruelly carried away both book and copy. But no difficulties or obstructions could resist the force of the boy's genius. At eighteen we find him court musician at Weimar; and from that time his progress was rapid. He had only one rival as an organ-player, and that was Handel.” (1) Para Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce: “A Sebastián Bach le fue casi tan difícil como a Haendel aprender la primera música, porque su hermano mayor, el organista Cristóbal, tenía celos de él, y le escondió el libro donde estaban las mejores piezas de los maestros del clavicordio. Pero Sebastián encontró el libro en una alacena, se lo llevó a su cuarto, y empezó a copiarlo a deshoras de la noche, a la luz del cielo, que en verano es muy claro, o a la luz de la luna. Su hermano lo descubrió, y tuvo la crueldad de llevarse el libro y la copia, lo que de nada le valió, porque a los dieciocho años ya estaba Sebastián de músico en la corte famosa de Weimar, y no tenía como organista más rival que Haendel.” (18:391-392) Como se observa, la traducción de Martí contiene los mismos elementos pero de una forma más sintética. Hay varias referencias a Bach en la obra martiana. En uno de sus trabajos donde honra al prodigioso violinista cubano José Silvestre White Laffite en la Revista Universal de México del 12 de junio de 1875 comenta “Presentábase White a tocar la Ciaconna, para violón obligado, de Bach, cuando llegaba yo al salón. En buena hora llegué: ni antes de aquella música titánica debe oírse nada, ni nada debiera haberse oído después si todavía no hubiese quedado algo nuevo con que asombrarse en el quinteto de Mozart.” (5:300) Desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas del 23 de mayo de 1882, describiendo un concierto en Nueva York,  menciona la belleza de “…la Pasión de San Mateo de Bach arrebatado (9:313) En su artículo sobre White en la Revista Universal de México con fecha 12 de junio de 1875, hay una referencia a La Ciaconna de Bach, referido éste “…como el artista de la corte de Weímar…” (5:301) Para conocer más acerca de José Martí y la música, remitimos al interesado al ensayo de Soponov (2)  


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 76. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray,  384 pp.

(2) M. A. Soponov 1981. José Martí y la música. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos 4: 298-308

Johann Sebastian Bach

Bacon

Nombre completo: Francis Bacon

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor inglés

Época: 1561-1626

Obras citadas indirectamente: Essays, Civil and Moral Chapter XLII Of Youth and Age, Chapter LVIII Of Vicissitude of things   

Comentarios: En Great young men, Bacon se menciona dos veces. Como parte de su introducción al artículo Smiles escribe: “There be some,” said Bacon, “who have an over-early ripeness in their years, which fadeth betimes.” (1) Más adelante hablando de Heinecken, el niño de la antigua ciudad de Lubeck, vuelve a mencionar a Bacon al decir: “Of this poor child it might be said, in Bacon´s words, that “Phaeton´s car went but a day.” (2)  En su artículo Músicos poetas y pintores, Martí mantiene las dos menciones a Bacon. Primero,  Martí dice: “Hay algunos—dice el inglés Bacon—que maduran mucho antes de la edad y se van como vienen…" (18: 391) Se trata de una traducción textual de la  frase de Bacon que proviene del Capítulo XLII Sobre juventud y edad de sus famosos Ensayos.  En la segunda mención Martí dice:  “De esa pobre criatura puede decirse lo de Bacon: "El carro de Faetón no anduvo más que un día." (18: 391) Se trata de una frase de Bacon en su  Capítulo LVIII Sobre vicisitudes de las cosas, también de sus Ensayos. Aunque directamente no se cita ninguna obra de Bacon, la aparición de dos de sus pensamientos alude indirectamente a sus Ensayos civiles y morales, lo cual enriquece las referencias literarias que subyacen detrás de La Edad de Oro. En la obra martiana hay varias referencias a citas y obras de Francis Bacon.  


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 76. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Idem.

Francis Bacon

Barrett Browning

Nombre completo: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poetisa inglesa

Época: 1806-1861

Obra citada indirectamente: An Essay on Mind, with Other Poems

Comentarios: En su capítulo Great young men Samuel Smiles había escrito: "Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote prose an verse at ten, and published her first volume of poems at seventeen." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce a Smiles textualmente al hablar de este personaje: “A los diecisiete había publicado su primer tomo la poetisa Barret Browning, que desde los diez escribía en verso y prosa…” (18:399) No hay referencia directa a ninguna obra de esta escritora pero indirectamente se señala un volumen de poemas posterior y cercano a 1823, año en que la poetisa cumplió 17 años. Se trata de An Essay on Mind and Other Poems (Ensayo sobre la mente y otros poemas) que publicó anónimamente en 1826. En  los Cuadernos de apuntes de Martí hay referencias al volumen de poemas de Barret Browning titulado Lady Geraldine Courtship (21:431) a su más largo y conocido poema de 1856, Aurora Leigh (21:376) y varios fragmentos de poemas (21:343 y 433).


(1) Smiles, Samuel 1887. Chapter III. Great young men. pp. 94. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius 1888, Harper and Brothers, 384 pp.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Beatriz

Nombre completo: Beatriz Portinari

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Amada de Dante Alighieri

Época: 1266-1290

Obras citadas:  Ninguna

Comentarios: Beatriz  aparece en el Capítulo III Great young men como parte de la biografía de Dante cuando  Samuel Smiles escribe: “Poets also, like musicians and artists, have in many cases given early indications of their genius especially poets of a sensitive, fervid, and impassioned character…[…]…Dante showed this when a boy of nine years old by falling passionately in love with Beatrice, a girl of eight; and the passion thus inspired became the pervading principle of his life, and the source of the sublimest conceptions of his muse.” (1) Para Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce lo siguiente: “Los poetas también suelen dar pronto muestras de su vocación, sobre todo los de alma inquieta, sensible y apasionada. Dante a los nueve años escribía versos a la niña de ocho años de que habla en su Vida Nueva.” (18:395) Cuando se compara el texto original en inglés con la traducción de Martí, se observa que en Great young men, Smiles menciona el nombre de la amada del poeta: Beatriz, pero Martí en La Edad de Oro lo  sustituye por “la niña de ocho años de que habla en su Vida Nueva.” ¿No parece esto una evidente invitación de Martí a la búsqueda y la lectura? En La Opinión Nacional del 21 de noviembre de 1881, como parte de sus comentarios sobre el libro Mercedes de Ríos de Palma di Cesnola, dice: " Es una historia de amor, que los críticos juzgan interesante y bien contada. Al ver a Mercedes, súbito e indominable cariño, como el que encendió el alma de Romeo al ver a Julieta, y el alma de Dante al ver a Beatriz, se apodera de la voluntad del protagonista." (23:90).


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Beatriz Portinari

Dante y Beatriz, del pintor  Henry Holiday, que imagina su encuentro en el Puente de Santa Trinidad

Beethoven

Nombre completo: Ludwig van Beethoven

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor alemán

Época: 1770-1827

Obras citadas indirectamente: Sonatas WOO47 para piano llamadas Electorales

Comentarios: En Great young men Samuel Smiles, escribe: "Beethoven was not as precocious as either Handel or Mozart. His music was, in a measure, thrashed into him by his father, who wished to make him a prodigy. Young Beethoven performed in public, and composed three sonatas when only thirteen; though it was not until after he had reached his twenty-first year that he began to produce the great works on which his fame rests." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores, Martí sintetiza: “El padre de Beethoven quería hacer de él una maravilla, y le enseñó a fuerza de porrazos y penitencias tanta música, que a los trece años el niño tocaba en público y había compuesto tres sonatas. Pero hasta los veintiuno no empezó a producir sus obras sublimes.” (18:392) La versión de Martí, que no deja de tener cierto sentido del humor, deja más claro lo que hallamos en las biografías acerca de la difícil infancia de Beethoven. Hay varias referencias a Beethoven en la obra martiana, tres de ellas en sus Escenas Norteamericanas. En La Opinión Nacional de Caracas en 1882 escribió: “Se oyó la misa de Beethoven místico, que no cede en belleza a la Pasión de San Mateo de Bach arrebatado.” (9:313) Desde La Nación de Buenos Aires, el 21 de julio de 1886, escribió: “La marcha fúnebre de Beethoven, como un crespón que se va tendiendo lentamente, siguió a la alabanza, con esas hondas palabras musicales semejantes a almas heridas que suben por el aire a suspender sus nidos en el cielo.” (10:479) En La Nación de Buenos Aires, el 9 de marzo de 1886 menciona su Ópera Fidelio. (11:384) A pesar de las valoraciones de Martí sobre Beethoven no incluyó ninguna de sus obras en La Edad de Oro, si bien cita indirectamente -al traducir a Smiles-  tres sonatas producidas a la edad de 13 años, que se refieren a las tres sonatas WOO47 para piano llamadas Electorales (Kurfürsten)  dedicadas a su Elector Maximiliano Friedrich y publicadas el 14 de octubre de 1783 bajo el título: Tres Sonatas para Pianoforte, dedicadas a su Eminencia el Arzobispo y Elector de Colonia, compuesta por Ludwig van Beethoven a los once años (Drei Sonaten für Klavier, dem Hochwürdigen Erzbischofe und Kurfürsten zu Köln gewidmet un verfertiget von Ludwig van Beethoven, alt eilf Jahr). En sus Apuntes para los debates sobre  el idealismo y el realismo en el arte, leemos: “A las veces, a la mitad del día, he sentido al lado de un piano el crepúsculo dentro de mi alma: -¿Qué tocaban? Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn…” (19:410) Para conocer más acerca de José Martí y la música, remitimos al interesado al ensayo de Soponov (2)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. pp. 79. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) M. A. Soponov 1981. José Martí y la música. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, 4: 298-308.

Ludwig van Beethoven

pintado en 1820 por

Joseph Karl Stieler

Benvenuto Cellini

Nombre completo: Benvenuto Cellini

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor y escultor italiano

Época: 1500-1571

Obra citada indirectamente: La Vita di Benvenuto Cellini

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles menciona indirectamente a Cellini, como parte de la reseña biográfica de Miguel Ángel, al decir: "Before he reached his twenty-ninth year he had painted his cartoon, illustrative of an incident in the wars of Pisa, when a body of soldiers, surprised while bathing, started up to repulse the enemy. Benvenuto Cellini has said that he never equalled this work in any of his subsequent productions." (1) En La Edad de Oro, Martí traduce: "Benvenuto Cellini, aquel genio creador en el arte de ornamentar, dice que ningún cuadro de Miguel Ángel vale tanto como el que pintó a los veintinueve, en que unos soldados de Pisa, sorprendidos en el baño por sus enemigos, salen del agua a arremeter contra ellos…” (18:394). La traducción de Martí es prácticamente textual solo que añade su propia valoración de Cellini: "genio creador en el arte de ornamentar", que no había dicho Smiles Aunque Cellini se cita solo como crítico de Miguel Angel y no se señala ninguna de sus obras artísticas, sus palabras sobre el mencionado cuadro aluden indirectamente a su obra La Vita -autobiografia escrita en dos Tomos entre 1558 y 1566, e impresa por primera vez en 1728- donde aparece este comentario en el Capítulo XI del Libro Primero: "Michelagnolo Buonaarroti, innel suo dimostrava una quantità di fanterie che per essere di state s'erano missi a bagnare in Arno; e in questo istante dimostra ch' e' si dia a l'arme, a quelle fanterie ignude corrono a l'arme, e con tanti bei gesti, che mai né delli antichi né d'altri moderni non si vidde opera che arrivassi a cosí alto segno..."(2) De la admiración de Martí por Cellini hablan varios de sus escritos. En Amistad Funesta escribe: “Pues una mujer sin ternura ¿qué es sino un vaso de carne, aunque lo hubiese moldeado Cellini, repleto de veneno?” (18:265) Desde La Opinión Nacional de Nueva York del 7 de enero de 1882 hablando del poeta francés Francois Coppée dice que: “…hace versos con aquella elegancia y madurez con que Cellini cincelaba copas…” (14:315) y en La América de Nueva York en enero de 1884 nos habla de: “…aquel creador gigantesco y amable, Benvenuto Cellini…” (19:289-293) En Patria, el 31 de octubre de 1893, para hablarnos del amor por la belleza de Julián del Casal nos dice que “…como Cellini, ponía en un salero a Júpiter.” (5:221) En su poema Sed de belleza dice: "Dadme lo sumo y lo perfecto: dadme/ Un dibujo de Angelo: una espada/ Con puño de Cellini..." (16:165)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 82. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) La Vita di Benvenuto Cellini Fiorentino scritta (per lui medesimo) in Firenze. Biblioteca Telematica Classici della Letteratura Italiana, 342 pp.

Benvenuto Cellini

Bulwer Lytton

Nombre completo: Edward George Earl Bulwer Lytton

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor inglés

Época: 1803-1873

Obra citada directamente: Ismael

Comentarios: Lytton aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Smiles había escrito: “Bulwer Lytton produced his Ismael at fifteen, and Weeds and Wildflowers (a volume of poems) at twenty-one.” (1) Para Músicos, poetas y pintores, Martí traduce solamente la primera parte: “Bulwer Lytton tenía hecho a los quince su Ismael.” (18:399)  Hay referencias a Lytton en la obra martiana. En sus Fragmentos con el número 397 menciona un poema de Lytton en una nota que dice “Poesías inglesas y de los E.U. que debo recordar…[…]…Aux Italiens, uno de los “Fifty Perfect Poems”, de Dana, por Robert B. Lytton” (22:276) Desde La América de Nueva York en 1884 en su artículo Adelantos en México menciona a dos personajes de la  novela de Lytton llamada Kenelm Chíllingly: “Recuerda México a un buen caballero de un libro encantador del inglés Bulwer Litton, admirable libro, llamado del nombre de su héroe “Kenelm Chíllingly”; el cual caballero inglés, Sir Leopold Travers…” (7:33)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84-85. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Edward George Earl Bulwer Lytton

Byron

Nombre completo: George Gordon Lord Byron

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta inglés         

Época: 1788-1824     

Obras citadas directamente: Hours of Idleness (Horas de Ocio)/ English Bards and Scotch Reviewers (Los Poetas Ingleses y los Críticos de Escocia)/ Childe Harold  

Comentarios: Byron aparece en La Edad de Oro, ocupando un espacio importante en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya se ha explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. Desde el esbozo biográfico de Tomás Moore Martí toma la referencia de Smiles y conocemos de un libro sobre la Vida de Byron. (18:398). Más adelante se desarrolla la reseña biográfica del personaje que en Great young men de Smiles aparece así: “Byron was another great and erratic genius, belonging to the same group as Keats and Shelley. Of turbulent and violent temper, he was careless of learning at school, yet he could “fall in love” when not quite eight years old. He was club-footed. While at Aberdeen he was nicknamed "Shauchlin" Geordie; yet he strove to distinguish himself in the sports of youth, and, like Keats, he fought his way to supremacy amongst his schoolfellows, "losing," as he himself says, "only one battle out of seven." While at Trinity College, Cambridge he kept a bear and several bull-dogs, and indulged in many eccentricities. A strange training, one would think, for a poet! Yet, as early as his twelfth year, he had broken out into verse, inspired by the boyish passion which he entertained for a cousin of about his own age. With all his waywardness, Byron was a voracious reader in general literature, and he early endeavoured to embody his thoughts in poetry. In his eighteenth year, while yet at college, he had printed a thin quarto volume of poems for private circulation, and in the following year he published his Hours of Idleness. Stung into revenge by the contemptuous notice of his volume by Henry Brougham in the Edinburgh Review, he published, at twenty-one, his English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Three years later, when twenty-four, the first canto of his Childe Harold appeared. "At twenty-five," said Macaulay, he found himself on the highest pinnacle of literary fame, with Scott, Wordsworth, Southey, and a crowd of other distinguished writers at his feet. There is scarcely an instance in history of so sudden a rise to so dizzy an eminence." He died in his thirty-seventh year an age that has been fatal to so many men of genius.” (1) Martí adapta el texto completo y con su poder de síntesis traduce: “Byron fue otro genio extraordinario y errante de la misma época de Shelley y de Keats. Desde la escuela se le conoció el carácter turbulento y arrebatado. De los libros se cuidaba poco; pero antes de los ocho años ya sufría de penas de hombre. Tenía una pierna más corta que la otra, aunque eso no le quitaba los bríos, y se hizo el dueño de la escuela a fuerza de puños, como Keats: él mismo cuenta que de siete batallas perdía una. Cuando estaba en Cambridge de estudiante, tenía en su casa un oso y varios perros de presa, y cada día contaban de él una historia escandalosa: aquél era sin embargo el niño sensible que a los doce años había celebrado en versos sentidos a una prima suya. Leía con afán todos los libros de literatura, y a los dieciocho años publicó para sus amigos su primer libro de versos: Horas de Ocio. La Revista de Edimburgo habló del libro con desdén, y Byron contestó con su célebre sátira sobre los Poetas Ingleses y los Críticos de Escocia. Cumplía los veinticuatro cuando salió al público el primer canto de su poema Childe Harold. “A los veinticinco años”, dice Macaulay, “se vio Byron en la cima de la gloria literaria, con todos los ingleses famosos de la época a sus pies. Byron era ya más célebre que Scott, Wordsworth, y Southey. Apenas hay ejemplo de un ascenso tan rápido a tan vertiginosa eminencia.” Murió a los treinta y siete años, edad fatal para tantos hombre de genio.” (18:393) La traducción es prácticamente textual con algunos cambios interesantes, como cuando Smiles dice que Byron se enamoró antes de los ocho años (“fall in love when not quite eight years old”) y Martí traduce: “antes de los ocho años ya sufría de penas de hombre.” Martí también cambia el nombre de la escuela: "Trinity College", por el lugar: "Cambridge" y elimina la frase de Smiles cuando hablando de las excentricidades de Byron dice: “A strange training, one would think, for a poet!” Para Martí no era nada raro ver juntas la extravagancia –como muestra de originalidad- junto al talento poético. El vínculo de Martí con el poeta inglés empieza temprano pues en 1866, trabaja en la traducción de A Mistery de Byron, según leemos en sus fragmentos: "Allá 16 años hace, cuando tenía yo 13, revolvía con cierto desembarazo  The American popular lessons, -e intenté la traducción del Hamlet. Como no pude pasar de la escena de los sepultureros, y creía yo entonces indigno de un gran genio que hablara de ratones, -me contenté con el incestuoso “A Mystery” de Lord Byron." (22:285) La obra martiana está llena de referencias a Lord Byron. La anécdota de la crítica desdeñosa de La Revista de Edimburgo que leemos en La Edad de Oro aparece en su cuaderno de apuntes número 18 donde comenta: “¿A Byron, no le dijo la Edimburgh Review que renunciara a los versos, que no sabía Ortografía?” (21:426) En La Opinión Nacional del 13 de enero de 1882 también hace alusión al incidente: “La Revista de Edimburgo, que es un periódico antiguo y famoso, que dio por cierto mucho que hacer a lord Byron e  inspiró una de sus más ásperas sátiras…” (23:150) Hay referencias a sus obras: Giuour (5:194), Childe Harold, El Corsario (15:355), Mazeppa, Lara (15:356), o a sus personajes: Astarté de Manfredo (15:357) o Don Juan de su obra homónima (23:213; 22:231) Hay calificativos directos para Byron “…ofendido, generoso, ardiente…” (13:311), “…con su lira de ala de llama…” (14:88)  que “…veía la injusticia, y la azotaba…” (15:417); o para aquellos con quienes compara: “… tan bello como Byron…” (9: 337), “el resplandor de Byron…” (6:368), “…dudan como Byron…” (15:25) o “…arranques del escepticismo de Byron…” (15:31). Hay en sus fragmentos tres páginas donde comenta y valora al poeta y su obra (15:355-357)  En su ensayo sobre Pushkin publicado en The Sun de Nueva York el, 28 de agosto de 1880 nos dice, en fin: “Byron había muerto con la espada puesta sobre su lira…” (15:417)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 92. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

George Gordon Lord Byron

Calderón

Nombre completo: Pedro Calderón de la Barca

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y dramaturgo español

Época: 1600-1681

Obra citada directamente: El Carro del Cielo

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Lope de Vega and Calderon, two of the most prolific of dramatists, began writing very early the one at twelve, the other at thirteen…[…]…Calderon also was a most prolific playwriter in his youth, having added some four hundred dramas to the national stock. His first work, Carro del Cielo, was written at thirteen. He became a priest at fifty, and wrote only sacred pieces after he had entered the Church.” (1) Para Músicos poetas y pintores, Martí traduce casi textualmente: “Lope de Vega y Calderón, que son los que más han escrito para el teatro, empezaron muy temprano, uno a los doce años y otro a los trece…[…]…Calderón no escribió menos de cuatrocientos dramas. A los trece años compuso su primera obra El Carro del Cielo. A los cincuenta se hizo sacerdote, como Lope, y ya no escribió más que piezas sagradas." (18:396) El Carro del Cielo (llamada también de San Elías) aparecía incluido en el contenido del Tomo 10 preparado por Diego Juan de Vera Tassis y Villarroel -amigo de Calderón y editor de sus obras- para ser publicado, al igual que hizo con los otros nueve tomos  pero no hay noticia de que haya sido impreso. Desgraciadamente, esta obra se ha perdido y sobre ella se conjetura que probablemente fue un auto sacramental que se representó en Valencia en 1627. (3) La obra martiana, a lo largo de toda su cronología, está llena de referencias a Calderón que ilustran la admiración del Maestro. En la Revista Universal de México hay varias referencias entre 1875 a 1876. Así, leemos en el número de septiembre 10 de 1875: “…el nunca muerto Calderón…” (6:325), en el del 13 de marzo de 1875: “…aquella habla divina con que arrobaba y encanta Calderón…” (15: 42), en el de noviembre 13 de 1875: “Calderón es el más grande de los poetas españoles muy por encima del ingenioso Tirso y del valiosísimo fray Lope.- Realizó su pensamiento en aquella época; tal vez: al pensar sus caracteres, los pensó espontáneamente en ella y de aquí esa obra nueva, caballeresca por la forma: más apasionada que caballeresca: ajena a la mezquina escuela actual y rica de originalidad y sentimiento.” (15:87) y en el de agosto 23 de 1876: “Es Calderón en el ingenio humano cima altísima, y allá en el cielo alto se hallan juntos, él y Shakespeare grandioso, a par de Esquilo, Schiller y el gran Goethe. Y a aquella altura: nadie más.” (6:439) En su trabajo sobre poesía dramática americana de Guatemala en febrero de 1878 nos habla del: “…renaciente teatro español, por Lope dado a vida, por Calderón levantadísimo...” (7:176) Hay todo un trabajo publicado por El centenario de Calderón en La Opinión Nacional de Caracas del  23 de junio de 1881 (15:117) que cuenta con un anuncio en el artículo previo Centenario de Calderón. Primeras nuevas (15:107) en el mismo periódico, donde nos anuncia las celebraciones por  "…aquel hombre de su tiempo y de todos los tiempos, filósofo rebelde y siervo manso, rey de suyo y soldado de reyes, gran meditabundo, gran esperador, gran triste, sacerdote más que por creencia en lo divino, por desdén en lo humano: Calderón de la Barca.” (15:111) En La Opinión Nacional de Caracas el 23 de febrero de 1882: “Calderón en su hermosísima habla vieja…” (14: 375) En su cuaderno de apuntes número 4 aparece esta nota: “Obrar bien es lo que importa”.-Calderón.” (21:144)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 87. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Don Eugenio Hartzenbusch 1848. Biblioteca de autores españoles. Comedias de Don Pedro Calderón de la Barca. Tomo Primero. Imprenta de la Publicidad, Madrid

(3) A. Valbuena-Briones. La primera "comedia" de Calderón, Centro Virtual Cervantes.

Pedro Calderón de la Barca

Canova

Nombre completo: Antonio Canova

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escultor italiano neoclásico

Época: 1757-1822

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe: “Canova is said to have given indications of his genius at four years old by modelling a lion out of a roll of butter. He began to cut statuary from the marble at fourteen, and went on from one triumph to another.”(1) Para Músicos poetas y pintores Martí traduce solo la primera parte de lo expresado por Smiles y dice: “Canova el escultor, hizo a los cuatro años un león de un pan de mantequilla.” (18:394) Salvo la anécdota sobre el león elaborado con el pan con mantequilla como obra efímera de la niñez de Canova, no hay referencia a ninguna otra obra posterior de este autor. Sin embargo, Martí conocía la obra de este escultor pues años antes, en julio 16 de 1876 en su artículo sobre la muerte del escultor francés Francisco Dumaine había dicho en la  Revista Universal de México: “Si hubiera hecho una Venus, habría hecho la de Canova, tan bella en escultura como en pintura…” (6:412) La anécdota del león alude a un elemento figurativo que caracterizó algunas de las obras posteriores de Canova: los leones, como son ejemplo el Monumento Funerario a Clemente XIII en la Basílica de San Pedro en el Vaticano, donde aparecen dos leones dormidos de gran belleza o la tumba de la Duquesa María Cristina de Saxony-Teschen en la Iglesia de los Agustinos en Viena que también muestra un león reposando.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Antonio Canova

Carlyle        

Nombre completo: Thomas Carlyle  

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Historiador, crítico y ensayista escocés 

Época: 1795-1881     

Obras citadas directamente: Life of Friedrich Schiller (Vida del Poeta Schiller)     

Obras citadas indirectamente: Two note books (Dos cuadernos de notas)        

Comentarios: En Great young men este personaje aparece dos veces. En su primera aparición Martí nos dice: “El inglés Carlyle habla en su Vida del Poeta Schiller…” (18:393) traduciendo a Samuel Smiles que igualmente había hecho referencia a esta obra.(1) En la segunda aparición de Carlyle, Martí nos cuenta: “Dice Carlyle que en una clase de la escuela de gramática de Edimburgo había dos muchachos: “John, siempre, hecho un brinquillo, correcto y ducal; Walter, siempre desarreglado, borrico y tartamudo. Con el correr de los años, John llegó a ser el Regidor John, de un barrio infeliz, y Walter fue Sir Walter Scott, de todo el universo.” Dice Carlyle con mucho seso, que la legumbre más precoz y completa es la col.” (18:400). Esta reseña viene de la traducción casi textual del texto de Smiles que a su vez estaba citando un párrafo del libro Two note books (2) de Carlyle: "Two boys," says Carlyle," were once of a class in the Edinburgh Grammar School: John, ever trim, precise, and dux; Walter, ever slovenly, confused, and dolt. In due time, John became Bailie John of Hunter Square, and Walter became Sir Walter Scott of the Universe." Carlyle pithily says that the quickest and completest of all vegetables is the cabbage.” (3). La obra martiana está llena de referencias a Carlyle. En La Opinión Nacional del 23 de noviembre de 1881, leemos: “Carlyle, que ha sido una especie de Shakespeare de la prosa, en lo osado, innovador, independiente, profundo, universal y desenvuelto, trabajó mucho tiempo antes de alcanzar fama. Comenzó la fama a halagarle luego de publicado su estudio sobre Burns, a quien quiso con un cariño aún más vivo que el que profesaba a Goethe. La literatura alemana ejerció, sin embargo, influencia grande en la mente del poderoso filósofo.” (23:93) En el mismo periódico del 19 de noviembre de 1881 nos dice: “Carlyle, que veía con su ojo profundo en las entrañas de los hombres y en las entrañas de la tierra…”  (23:88) En su ensayo sobre Emerson del mismo diario el 19 de mayo de 1882  define: “Carlyle, el gran filósofo inglés, que se revolvió contra la tierra con brillo y fuerza de Satán…” (13:18) En La Nación de Buenos Aires, el 20 de junio de 1883, dice: “Carlyle, en quien la magnitud excelsa de la inteligencia llegó a suplir a veces el amor, que como de tierra fría y breñosa, había huido de su ingrato corazón…” (9:413) y años más tarde, el 17 de febrero de 1886, en el mismo periódico se refiere a la lengua de Carlyle “…a modo de quimera de mirada encendida.” (10:367). En La América de Nueva York en febrero de 1884 hace una crítica del libro de Carlyle Sartor Resartus bajo el título de Carlyle, romanos y ovejas. (15:383) Sobre este libro aparece una nota en su cuaderno de apuntes número 18 que dice: "-Carlyle no encontró publicador para el “Sartor Resartus” en Inglaterra." (21:397) Hay muchas referencias a Carlyle en sus notas, fragmentos y cuadernos de apuntes. En sus Notas aparece: “Un libro: Diccionario de Juicios de los grandes hombres…” donde menciona a Carlyle (18:288), quien también aparece entre los personajes de los libros que Martí proyectaba escribir.(18:286)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Thomas Carlyle 1898. Fable (IV), p 105. En: Two note books  from 23d march 1822 to 16th may 1832. Edited by Charles Eliot Norton, New York. The Grolier Club, 339 pp.

(3) Samuel Smiles, ob. cit, p. 94.

Thomas Carlyle  

Celia    

Nombre completo: Celia

Actividad/ Nacionalidad:  Amada de Thomas Moore

Época: Hacia 1779-1852

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: Celia aparece en Great young men  cuando Smiles escribe: “Thomas Moore was another precocious poet. He was a pretty boy; Joseph Atkinson, one of his early friends, spoke of him as an infant Cupid sporting on the bosom of Venus. He wrote love verses to Zelia at thirteen, and began his translation of Anacreon at fourteen. At that age he composed an ode about "Full goblets quaffing,” and "Dancing with nymphs to sportive measures, led by a winged train of pleasures, “' that might have somewhat disconcerted his virtuous mother, the grocer's wife. But Moore worked his way out of luscious poetry ; and the Dublin Anacreon at length became famous as the author of the Irish Melodies, Lalla Rookh, The Epicurean, and the Life of Byron.” (1) Martí, crea una versión sintética, despojada de los detalles que tiene el contenido original de Smiles y traduce: “El irlandés Moore componía a los trece versos buenos a su Celia famosa, y a los catorce había  empezado a traducir del griego a Anacreonte. En su casa no sabían qué significaban aquellas ninfas, aquellos placeres alados, y aquellas canciones al vino. Moore se libró pronto de estos modelos peligrosos, y alcanzó fama mejor con los versos ricos de su Lalla Rookh y la prosa ejemplar de su Vida de Byron.” (18:398) En la obra martiana hay varias menciones directas a Moore pero no hallamos referencias a Celia.


Notas. (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 90-91. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Thomas Moore

 

Cervantes

Nombre completo: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Novelista, poeta y dramaturgo español

Época: 1547-1616

Obras citadas directamente: Pastorales y canciones

Comentarios: En Great young men Smiles escribe sobre Cervantes: “It was in poetical composition that the genius of Cervantes first displayed itself. Before he had reached his twentieth year he had composed several romances and ballads, besides a pastoral entitled Felena.” (1) En La Edad de Oro leemos: “Cervantes empezó a escribir en verso, y no tenía todo el bigote cuando ya había escrito sus pastorales y canciones a la moda-italiana.” (18-395) Como se observa Martí reelabora totalmente la idea de Smiles y elimina incluso la mención del pastoral Felena. La obra martiana está llena de referencias a Cervantes pero tal vez una de la imágenes más acabadas nos la entrega desde su Conferencia sobre Varona: “Cervantes es…[…]…aquel temprano amigo del hombre que vivió en tiempos aciagos para la libertad y el decoro, y con la dulce tristeza del genio prefirió la vida entre los humildes al adelanto cortesano, y es a la vez deleite de las letras y uno de los caracteres más bellos de la historia.” (5:120) Manuel Isidro Méndez ofrece unas notas sobre Cervantes y Martí. (2)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young ran. Pp. 85. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Manuel Isidro Méndez 1982. Cervantes y Martí. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, pp. 275-276.

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Chatterton

Nombre completo: Thomas Chatterton

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor inglés

Época: 1752-1770

Obras citadas directamente: Ode to Liberty (Oda a la Libertad)/ The Minstrel's Song (Canto del Bardo)

Comentarios:  En Great young men Smiles escribe: “The marvellous boy, Chatterton, who "perished in his pride,” ran his short but brilliant career in seventeen years and nine months. Campbell, the poet, has said of him, "No English poet ever equalled Chatterton at sixteen." His famous Ode to Liberty and his exquisite piece, The Minstrel's Song, give perhaps the best idea of the strength and grasp of his genius. But his fierce and defiant spirit, his scornful pride, his defective moral character, and his total misconception of the true conditions of life, ruined him, as they would have ruined a much stronger man; and he poisoned himself almost before he had begun to live.” (1) Martí sintetiza: “El infeliz Chatterton logró engañar con una maravillosa falsificación literaria a los eruditos más famosos de su tiempo: rebosan genio la oda de Chatterton a la Libertad y su Canto del Bardo. Pero era fiero y arrogante, de carácter descompuesto y defectuoso, y rebelde contra las leyes de la vida. Murió antes de haber comenzado vivir.” (18:397) Si analizamos comparativamente ambas versiones vemos que Martí elimina la referencia a Campbell, las valoraciones moralistas e incorpora el elemento de Chatterton como falsificador literario, clave en la biografía de este personaje y que Smiles pasó por alto. En su artículo Impresiones de América en The Hour de Nueva York el 23 de octubre de 1880, dice: “El pobre Chatterton tenía razón cuando añoraba desesperadamente las delicias de la soledad.” (19:125)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 90. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Thomas Chatterton

Chaucer

Nombre completo: Geoffrey Chaucer

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor filósofo, diplomático y poeta inglés

Época: 1340-1400

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: Chaucer aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe: “Of English poets, perhaps the very greatest were not precocious, though many gave early indications of genius. We know very little of the youth of Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Spenser, and very little even of their manhood." (1) Para su versión Martí traduce textualmente: “Entre los poetas ingleses de la antigüedad hubo muy pocos precoces. Se sabe poco de Chaucer...“ (18:397) En realidad ambos autores simplemente mencionan a Chaucer pero no desarrollan ninguna reseña. No hallamos referencias de Chaucer en el resto de la obra martiana. Para mayor información sobre éste y otros personajes de Músicos, poetas y pintores remitimos a nuestro ensayo comparativo. (2)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 89. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Vitral de Geoffrey Chaucer

Cimarosa   

Nombre completo: Domenico Cimarosa

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor clásico italiano

Época: 1749-1801

Obra citada directamente: La Baronessa Stramba/ La Baronesa de Stramba

Comentarios: Cimarosa parece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe una corta reseña de este músico: “Cimarosa, the cobbler's son, wrote Baroness Stramba, his first musical work, at nineteen. En Músicos poetas y pintores de La Edad de Oro, Martí mantiene el estilo sintético del texto en inglés de Samuel Smiles y traduce: “Cimarosa, hijo de un zapatero remendón, era autor a los diecinueve de La Baronesa de Stramba.” (18:393)  En Patria del 30 de abril de 1892, en su artículo sobre el cubano Emilio Agramonte se refiere a la “…música de la más fina y creadora…[…]…música de aire y juguete…” (5:308) de Cimarosa. No hemos hallado otras referencias de este compositor en el resto de la obra de Martí. Para conocer más acerca de José Martí y la música, remitimos al interesado al ensayo de Soponov (2)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) M. A. Soponov 1981. José Martí y la música. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, La Habana, 4: 298-308

Domenico Cimarosa

Clark   

Nombre completo: William Clerk  

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Amigo de Walter Scott/ Inglés      

Época: Hacia 1771-1832      

Obras citadas directamente: Ninguna          

Comentarios: Clark parece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, como parte de la reseña de Walter Scott leemos: “When Walter Scott's father found that the boy had on one occasion been wandering about the country with his friend Clark…” (1) Martí traduce textualmente: “Cuando su padre supo que había estado vagando por el país con su camarada Clark…” (18:400) Según Richard H. Hutton en su libro sobre Scott, William Clerk fue su amigo más íntimo desde la escuela y probablemente quien más estimuló su imaginación en su juventud. (2) De hecho, en el Sitio Web que dedica la Biblioteca de la Universidad de Edimburgo a Sir Walter Scott pueden leerse algunas cartas que escribió Scott a su amigo Clerk (o donde éste se menciona) entre 1787 a 1799, entre 1823 a 1825, entre 1825 a 1826 y entre 1826 a 1828, lo que refleja una amistad mantenida de 55 años. Algunos críticos piensan en William Clerk como el modelo de Darsie Latimer, amigo de Alan Fairford, ambos personajes de la novela Redgauntlet (1824) de Scott. No hemos hallado referencias a este personaje en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 94. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp. 

(2) Richard H. Hutton 1888. Chapter VI. Companions and Friends, P.60. En: Life of Sir Walter Scott, London, Macmillan and Co. and New York.

Walter Scott el amigo

de William Clark

Coleridge      

Nombre completo: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta, crítico y filósofo inglés

Época: 1772-1834

Obra citada directamente: Hymn before sunrise

Comentarios: En Great young man, Samuel Smiles escribe sobre Coleridge: "Coleridge wrote his first poem at twenty-two, and his Hymn before Sunrise than which poetical literature presents no more remarkable union of sublimity and power at twenty-five." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles, nos dice que “Coleridge, escribió a los veinticinco su Himno del Amanecer, donde se ven en unión completa la sublimidad y la energía.”  (18: 339) Se trata del poema Hymn before sunrise de 1797. Esta obra no aparece citada en otros materiales de Martí aunque sí existen en su cuaderno de apuntes número 18 de 1894 dos fragmentos tomados de otros poemas de Coleridge, que hablan de su conocimiento y admiración por este personaje. El fragmento que dice “Work without hope draws nectar/ And hope without an object cannot live.” (21: 403) es tomado del poema Work without hope de 1827 y el fragmento “a grief without a pang, void, dark and drear.” (21: 403) es tomado del Verso II de Dejection: an ode, de 1802. En otra parte del mismo cuaderno de apuntes dice: “Yo estaba orgulloso de haber hallado, como una de las fórmulas de la vida, que sé que he sacado de mi observación directa y mi experiencia, esta frase que escribí y no publiqué: -No se recibe más que lo que se da. Yo no sabía quien era Coleridge hasta hace unos tres años. ¡Y hoy la hallo en Coleridge, palabra por palabra!” (21:405) Se refiere Martí a la estrofa “we receive but what we give”, que aparece en el Verso IV de Dejection: an ode, de 1802.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 88. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Congreve

Nombre completo: William Congreve

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Dramaturgo y poeta inglés

Época: 1670-1729

Obra citada directamente: Incógnita

Comentarios: Congreve aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: “Congreve wrote his Incognita, a romance, at nineteen, and The Double Dealer at twenty. Indeed, all his plays were written before he was twenty-five..." (1) En su artículo Músicos, poetas y pintores, Martí escribe: “El inglés Congreve escribió a los diecinueve su novela Incógnita, y todas sus comedias antes de los veinticinco.” (18:397) Comparativamente, el texto martiano en La Edad de Oro aparece más sintético y elimina la comedia de Congreve El falso amigo (The Double Dealer), que es mencionada por Smiles. Ya hemos comentado en nuestro ensayo comparativo que la exclusión de obras es un recurso empleado por Martí en su adaptación de Músicos, poetas y pintores, lo cual responde a la  necesidad de ajustar a su espacio la extensa información que le ofrecía la obra de Smiles, dejando en la reseña de cada autor las obras más relevantes. (2) No hallamos referencias de Congreve en ninguna otra parte de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 88. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Alejandro Herrera Moreno 1989. Análisis comparativo de Niños famosos y Músicos, poetas y pintores, Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, 12: 235-247.

William Congreve

Cornelio Nepote   

Nombre completo: Cornelio Nepote

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Biógrafo escritor romano

Época: 100-25 AC

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: Cornelio Nepote parece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, como parte de la semblanza del poeta alemán Wieland, Samuel Smiles escribe: “He read at three years old; Cornelius Nepos in Latin at seven.” (1) Para Músicos poetas y pintores Martí traduce textualmente el contenido de Smiles del inglés y dice: “Wieland, el poeta alemán, leía de corrido a los tres años, a los siete traducía del latín a Cornelio Nepote…”. (18:395). No hemos hallado otras referencias de Cornelio Nepote en la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 85. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp

Cornelio Nepote

Cowley

Nombre completo: Abraham Cowley

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta inglés

Época: 1618-1667

Obra citada indirectamente: Poetic Blossoms (Flores poéticas)

Comentarios: Cowley parece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: “At the early age of fifteen Cowley published a volume entitled Poetic Blossoms, containing, amongst other pieces, "The Tragical History of Pyramus and Thisbe," written when he was only twelve years old. (1) Martí solo traduce: “…Cowley escribía versos mitológicos a los doce años.” (18:397) Como se observa sustituye la referencia directa a la obra de Cowley Flores poéticas y a uno de los poemas de su contenido: La trágica historia de Píramo y Tisbe, por una simple alusión a su contenido mitológico y no menciona directamente obra alguna. Flores poéticas fue publicado en 1633 y en su contenido figuran cinco poemas que incluyen además del título mencionado por Smiles: Constantia and Philletus,  Dream of Elysium, Elegy on the Death of Dudley Lord Carlton y otra elegía. No hemos hallado otras referencias de Abraham Cowley en la obra martiana. 


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 89.  En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Abraham Cowley

Crabbe 

Nombre completo: George Crabbe

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y naturalista inglés

Época: 1754-1832

Obra citada: Ninguna

Comentarios: Crabbe parece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: “Crabbe, when a surgeon's apprentice in Suffolk, filled a drawer with verses, and gained a prize for a poem on Hope, offered by the proprietors of a lady's newspaper.” (1) La traducción de Martí en Músicos poetas y pintores toma solo la primera parte y elimina el lugar donde era Crabbe aprendiz de cirujano, la referencia al premio a la vez que la alusión al poema: “Crabbe llenó de versos toda una gaveta, cuando estaba de aprendiz de cirujano…” (18:399)  En el resto de la obra martiana hay una sola referencia a Crabbe en  sus fragmentos donde dice: “…el que no rechaza al persa por el color, ni un Crabbe por la virtud, ni a Byron por el desorden, ni los desdeña por no ser de su gusto el carácter o la poesía, sino las aprecia por lo sincero…” (22:101)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 93-94. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

George Crabbe

Cristóbal 

Artículo: Músicos poetas y pintores

Nombre completo: Johann Christoph Bach

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Organista y compositor aleman

Época: 1671-1721

Obra citada: Ninguna

Comentarios: Cristóbal parece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: “John Sebastian Bach had almost as many difficulties to encounter as Handel in acquiring a knowledge of music. His elder brother, John Christopher, the organist, was jealous of him, and hid away a volume containing a collection of pieces by the best harpsichord composers.“ (1) Martí traduce el contenido en inglés textualmente: “A Sebastián Bach le fue casi tan difícil como a Haendel aprender la primera música, porque su hermano mayor, el organista Cristóbal, tenía celos de él, y le escondió el libro donde estaban las mejores piezas de los maestros del clavicordio.” (18:391) No hemos hallado otras referencias a este personaje en el resto de la obra martiana si bien hay numerosas referencias sobre su hermano Johann Sebastian Bach.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 78. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Johann Sebastian Bach

hermano de Johann Christoph Bach

Daniel Schubart 

Nombre completo: Christian Friedrich Daniel Schubart

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta alemán, amigo de Schiller

Época: 1739-1791

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: Schubart aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: “In Carlyle's Life of Schiller we find a curious account of Daniel Schubart, a musician, poet, and preacher. He was "everything by turns, and nothing long.” His life was a series of violent fits, of study, idleness, and debauchery. Yet he was a man of extraordinary powers, an excellent musician, a great preacher, an able newspaper editor. He was by turns feted, imprisoned, and banished. After flickering through life like an ignis fatuus, he died in his fifty-second year, leaving his wife and family destitute.” (1) Para Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce: “El inglés Carlyle habla en su Vida del Poeta Schiller de un Daniel Schubart, que era poeta, músico y predicador, y a derechas no era nada. Todo lo hacía por espasmos y se cansaba de todo, de sus estudios, de su pereza y de sus desórdenes. Era hombre de mucha capacidad, notable como músico; como predicador, muy elocuente; y hábil periodista. A los cincuenta y dos años murió, y su mujer e hijo quedaron en la miseria. (18:393) No hay otras referencias de este personaje en la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Christian Friedrich Daniel Schubart

Dante

Nombre completo: Dante Alighieri

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor italiano

Época: 1265-1321

Obras citada directamente:  Vita nuova / Vida nueva

Comentarios: En Great young men,  Samuel Smiles escribe sobre Dante: “Poets also, like musicians and artists, have in many cases given early indications of their genius especially poets of a sensitive, fervid, and impassioned character…[…]…Dante showed this when a boy of nine years old by falling passionately in love with Beatrice, a girl of eight; and the passion thus inspired became the pervading principle of his life, and the source of the sublimest conceptions of his muse.” (1) Para Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce lo siguiente: “Los poetas también suelen dar pronto muestras de su vocación, sobre todo los de alma inquieta, sensible y apasionada. Dante a los nueve años escribía versos a la niña de ocho años de que habla en su Vida Nueva.” (18:395) Cuando se compara el texto original en inglés con la traducción de Martí, se observa que Smiles no incluye en su reseña de Dante a la obra Vida nueva. Por tanto, ésta fue añadida por Martí, si bien la misma sí aparece en Life and labour, pero no en su Capítulo III Great young men (que es el traducido) sino en su Capítulo IX titulado Single and married- Helps meet. (2) Cabría entonces preguntarse: si Martí respetó el contenido de Samuel Smiles sin hacer adiciones de obras en los restantes autores, ¿por qué hace una excepción con Dante e incorpora una obra donde Smiles no la había mencionado?  Posiblemente la clave nos la revela Luis Toledo Sande quien ofrece un resumen de citas de Martí sobre Dante y fundamenta la identificación martiana con el personaje italiano, señalando que –como Martí- Dante era un poeta extraordinario y fundacional, cuyas preocupaciones políticas y su condición de hombre de pensamiento lo enaltecían ante al Maestro. (3) Además, compartían ambos la experiencia del destierro político resumida en esta frase de Patria del 28 de enero de 1893: “…porque cada día entendemos mejor que, hoy como cuando el Dante, es salobre de veras el pan extranjero, y áspera de subir la escalera extraña…” (5:408). De hecho, es Dante una de la figuras que más referencias tiene en la obra martiana. Ya lo menciona al inicio de El presidio político en Cuba: "Dante no estuvo en presidio…[…]…Si hubiera sentido desplomarse sobre su cerebro las bóvedas oscuras de aquel tormento de la vida, hubiera desistido de pintar su Infierno. Las hubiera copiado, y lo hubiera pintado mejor". (1:45) En noticias sobre Italia de La Opinión Nacional de Caracas el 17 de noviembre de 1881 concluye diciendo:  “Donde amó Dante...[...]...alcanzó el hombre su más grande altura.” (14:194) Finalmente comentemos algo interesante. Otro elemento que surge de la comparación de ambos textos es que al hablar de Dante en Grandes jóvenes, Smiles menciona el nombre de la amada del poeta: Beatriz, pero Martí en La Edad de Oro lo elimina y lo sustituye por “la niña de ocho años de que habla en su Vida Nueva.” ¿No parece esto una evidente invitación de Martí a la búsqueda y la lectura? En sus Fragmentos, en un listado alfabético con el encabezamiento "Diccionario" aparece el nombre de Dante  junto al de otras 16 personalidades, cada una con un número al lado que parece ser los números de páginas correspondientes (22:127).


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Smiles. 1931. Chapter IX. Single and married- Helps meet. Pp. 326. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(3) Luis Toledo Sande 2003. Dante en Martí: del presidio a las estrellas. Sitio Web: http://www.granma.cubaweb.cu/l

Dante Alighieri

 

Duque de Sajonia Weíssenfels 

Nombre completo:  Johann Adolf  I

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Duque de Sajonia Weíssenfels

Época:  1649-1697     

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: La figura del Duque de Sajonia Weíssenfels  aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. Como parte de la biografía de Handel, Smiles escribió: “This was especially the case with the great master, Handel, who composed a set of sonatas when only ten years old. His father, a doctor, destined him for the profession of law, and forbade him to touch a musical instrument. He even avoided the boy to a public-school, for there he would be in taught the gamut. But young Handel´s passion for music could not be restrained. He found means to procure a dumb spinet, concealed it in a garret, and went to practice upon the mute instrument while the household were asleep. The Duke of Saxe-Weissenfels at length became acquainted with the boy´s passion, and interceded with his father.” (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores, como parte de la biografía de Handel, Martí traduce: "Haendel a los diez años había compuesto un libro de sonatas. Su padre lo quería hacer abogado, y le prohibió tocar un instrumento; pero el niño se procuró a escondidas un clavicordio mudo, y pasaba las noches tocando a oscuras en las teclas sin sonido. El duque de Sajonia Weíssenfels logró, a fuerza de ruegos, que el padre permitiera aprender la música a aquel genio perseverante..." (18:391)


(1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 77. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Johann Adolf  I

Emerson  

Nombre completo: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor y filósofo norteamericano

Época: 1803-1882              

Obras citadas indirectamente: Essays XVI New England Reformers

 Comentarios: Emerson aparece en el primer número de La Edad de Oro, con el poema Cada uno a su oficio  (18:325), traducido por Martí de su poema Fable de 1847. (1) El interesado puede acceder a una comparación  detallada de ambos textos que ya hemos realizado. (2) Emerson aparece también en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles había escrito sobre Emerson: “Truly, says Emerson, “the life of man is the true romance, which when valiantly conducted will yield the imagination a higher joy than any fiction.” (3) Martí traduce: "La verdad es -dice el norteamericano Emerson- que la verdadera novela del mundo está en la vida del hombre, y no hay fábula ni romance que recree más la imaginación que la historia de un hombre bravo que ha cumplido con su deber." (18:391) Estas palabras aparecen en los Ensayos de Emerson en su Capítulo XVI titulado New England Reformers. Muere Emerson el 27 de abril de 1882 estando Martí en Nueva York y desde allí publica su ensayo Emerson el gran filósofo americano ha muerto, en La Opinión Nacional de Caracas del 19 de mayo de 1882 (13:17-30), revelador de su real admiración sobre este personaje. Además, la obra martiana está llena de referencias a Emerson. Incluso en el cuaderno de apuntes No. 14 aparecen dos versos sin nombre: “Of what avail the plough and sail, Or land or life, if freedom fail?” (21:341) que son de Emerson (4) y no están identificados en el Índice de las Obras Completas. Existen importantes ensayos sobre Emerson y Martí, entre ellos el de Mary Cruz (5), José Ballón (6) o Pedro Pablo Rodríguez (7) Bajo el título de José Martí y la traducción, Eduardo González Muñiz ofrece una interesante análisis de Cada uno a su oficio.


Notas: (1) Ralph Waldo Emerson: Fable. En: The Complete Poetical Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press Cambridge, New York, 1918, p. 75.

(2) Alejandro Herrera 1996. Dos milagros y Cada uno a su oficio: los poemas de la naturaleza en La Edad de Oro. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, n. 18, La Habana, Cuba.

(3) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 76. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(4) Ralph Waldo Emerson 1929. “Boston,” stanza 15, The Complete Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, vol. 2, p. 897.

(5) Mary Cruz: Emerson por Martí. En: Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, 1982, t. 5, p. 80.

(6) José C. Ballon 1986. Autonomía cultural americana: Emerson y Martí. Madrid, Editorial Pliegos, 206 pp.

(7) P.P. Rodríguez. Jose Martí and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Cubanow Digital magazine of Cuban arts and cultur

Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Eneas        

Nombre completo: Eneas  

Actividad/ Nacionalidad:  Mitología griega y romana

Época: No aplica  

Obras citadas directamente: No aplica

Comentarios: Eneas aparece en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como explicamos- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, como parte de la reseña de Torquato Tasso, Samuel Smiles escribe: "At ten years old, when about to join his father at Rome, he composed a canzone on parting from his mother and sister at Naples. He compared himself to Ascanius escaping from Troy with his father Eneas." (1) Martí sintetiza y traduce: "A los diez años lamentó Tasso en verso su separación de su madre y hermana, y se comparó al triste Ascanio cuando huía de Troya con su padre Eneas a cuestas...” (18:395) Este pasaje alude a la salida de Ascanio tras la caida de Troya, conducido por su padre Eneas (junto con su abuelo Anquises) a las afueras de la ciudad para ir en busca de un mejor destino. En la traducción Martí agrega que Ascanio iba con su padre a cuestas, lo cual es improbable pues se trataba de un niño, quien llevaba a cuestas su padre Anquises -anciano y enfermo- era el propio Eneas. La Galería Borghese, en Roma exhibe una escultura de mármol conocida como: Eneas, Anquises y Ascanio, realizada por Gian Lorenzo Bernini entre 1618 y 1619. La escultura –de la cual se presentan dos vistas en las imágenes adjuntas-  representa a Eneas huyendo de la ciudad de Troya llevando a su anciano padre, Anquises sobre sus hombros, y a su hijo Ascanio llevando el sagrado fuego del hogar.  


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.       

Escultura de mármol:

Eneas, Anquises y Ascanio,

de Gian Lorenzo Bernini

Faeton

Nombre completo: Faeton

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Mitología griega

Época: No aplica

Obras citadas: No aplica

Comentarios: Faeton se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles había escrito: “Of this poor child it might be said, in Bacon's words that "Phaeton´s car went but a day.” (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores al referirse a la muerte precoz de Heinecken en su traducción, Martí escribe: “De esa pobre criatura puede decirse lo de Bacon: “El carro de Faetón no anduvo más que un día.” (18:391)  Se trata de una frase de Francis Bacon en su  Capítulo LVIII Sobre vicisitudes de las cosas, de sus Ensayos civiles y morales. No hemos hallado otras referencias a este personaje mitológico en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 76.  En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

La caída de Faeton, cuadro del

pintor flamenco Jan van Eyck

Franz  Schubert

Nombre completo: Franz Schubert

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor austríaco

Época: 1797-1828

Obras citadas directamente: Ninguna

Comentarios: En Great young men Smiles escribe: "Very different was Franz Schubert, the musical prodigy of Vienna, though his life was no more happy than that of Schubart. While but a child he played the violin, organ, and pianoforte. At eighteen he composed his popular Erl King, scribbling the notes down rapidly after he had read the words twice over. His genius teemed with the loveliest musical fancies, as his published works abundantly prove. He is supposed to have produced upwards of five hundred songs, besides operas, masses, sonatas, symphonies, and quartettes. He died when only thirty-one years old, almost destitute. Martí traduce: "Pero Franz Schubert, el niño maravilloso de Viena, vivió de otro modo, aunque no fue mucho más feliz. Tocaba el violín cuando no era más alto que él lo mismo que el piano y el órgano. Con leer una vez una canción, tenía bastante para ponerla en música exquisita, que parece de sueño y de capricho, y como si fuera un aire de colores. Escribió más de quinientas melodías, a más de óperas, misas, sonatas, sinfonías y cuartetos. Murió pobre a los treinta y un años.” (18:393) En sus Apuntes para los debates sobre el idealismo y el realismo en el arte Martí dice: “… a las veces, a la mitad del día, he sentido al lado de un piano el crepúsculo dentro de mi alma: -¿Qué tocaban? Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn.” (19:410) En su cuaderno de apuntes número 9 leemos: "Chopin murió oyendo cantar a la condesa Podocka el Ave María de Schubert!" (21:261)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Franz Schubert

Ghirlandaio

Nombre completo:  Domenico Ghirlandaio

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor italiano

Época: 1449-1494

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: Ghirlandaio se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, como parte de la reseña del pintor y escultor Miguel Angel Buonarroti, Samuel Smiles menciona indirectamente al pintor italiano Ghirlandaio como su maestro, cuando escribe: “But in vain; the boy would be an artist, and nothing else. The father was at last vanquished, and reluctantly consented to place him as a pupil under Ghirlandaio.” (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores, Martí traduce el original inglés textualmente: “Pero cortapiedras quería ser el hijo, y nada más. Cedió el padre al fin, y lo puso de alumno en el taller del pintor Ghirlandaio…” (18:394) No hemos hallado otras referencias al pintor Ghirlandaio en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 82. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Domenico Ghirlandaio

Goethe

Nombre completo: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe   

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Novelista, dramaturgo, poeta, científico y filósofo humanista alemán

Época: 1749-1832     

Obras citadas: Ninguna        

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Goethe was a precocious child, so much so that it is recorded that he could write German, French, Italian, Latin, and Greek, before he was eight. At that early age he had anxious thoughts about religion. He devised a form of worship to the "God of Nature," and even burned sacrifices.” (1) En Músicos poetas y pintores, Martí traduce: “De Goethe se dice que antes de cumplir los ocho años escribía en alemán, en francés, en italiano, en latín y en griego, y pensaba tanto en las cosas de la religión que imaginó un gran "Dios de la naturaleza", y le encendía hogueras en señal de adoración. Con el mismo afán estudiaba la música y el dibujo, y toda especie de ciencias.” (18:396)  Más adelante se vuelve a mencionar  a Goethe cuando Smiles dice: “Goethe was of opinion that the older was the riper poet. (2) Martí traduce: “…Goethe dice que con la edad se va haciendo mejor el poeta.” (18:399) La relación de Martí con el poeta alemán comenzó temprano según él mismo comenta a Manuel Mercado, en carta fechada en Guatemala, el 6 de julio de 1878: “Cuando yo era muy niño comencé a escribir un poema, en cuya introducción se disputaban a un hombre que acababa de nacer el Bien y el Mal: -después lloré como un niño al ver que, poco más o menos, éste era el pensamiento engendrador del Fausto.” (20:53) Gonzalo de Quesada y Miranda en su introducción al drama Adúltera de Martí ofrece una interesante valoración de la influencia de la cultura alemana, en particular de Goethe, en la obra del Maestro, cuando señala: “Entiendo existen muchos puntos de contacto entre Goethe y Martí, a pesar de haber sido tan distintas, sobre todo exteriormente, sus vidas. No es del todo sorprendente el uso de nombres alemanes por Martí para los personajes de su drama.” (3) Las referencias a Goethe en la obra martiana son tantas que trataremos de mencionar algunas cronológicamente. En la Revista Universal de México de agosto 23 de 1876, elogiando a Calderón de la Barca, dice: “Es Calderón en el ingenio humano cima altísima, y allá en el cielo alto se hallan juntos, él y Shakespeare grandioso, a par de Esquilo, Schiller y el gran Goethe. Y a aquella altura: nadie más.” (6:439)  En su artículo sobre Oscar Wilde de La Nación de Buenos Aires del 10 de diciembre de 1882: “Dice que nadie ha de intentar definir la belleza, luego de que Goethe la ha definido…” (15:363)  En Amistad funesta hay referencias a “…la Mignon de Goethe,…”  (18:205) Hay dos referencias martianas que aluden a una faceta menos conocida de Goethe: el científico, quien investigó en óptica, geología, química y osteología. Hablando sobre La Sociedad de Historia Natural desde la Revista Universal de México el 31 de julio de 1875  “Goethe contemplaba durante muchas horas una piedra: el presentimiento de los mundos palpitaba debajo de la frente ancha de Goethe. Así la ciencia ha tenido hijos gloriosos y oscuros, como la literatura sus Balzac no descubiertos, porque no supo la codicia dónde podría hallar Hadas nuevas vestidas de oro.” (6:287)  En su Sección Constante en La Opinión Nacional de Caracas del 16 de marzo de 1882, leemos: "Goethe adivinó mucho en la ciencia, por su maravillosa y bien gobernada imaginación. Fue él quien anunció, con esa visión poética que tiene de profecía, que sólo los rayos azules del espectro tienen el poder de producir fosforescencia en cuerpos capaces de manifestarla: la ciencia exacta demuestra hoy certidumbre de aquella intuición poética"(23:237) Para profundizar sobre esta faceta de Goethe recomendamos visitar Goethe's Delicate Empiricism. En su artículo Colon francés leemos: ¿No era Goethe el que decía, a propósito del arte de escribir, que se debía manejar la pluma menos y los pinceles más? (15:285) En sus apuntes expresa su admiración por la obra de Goethe, dándole un alcance universal: “Goethe hizo tal vez todo lo que había que hacer en la poesía moderna.” (21:159) A lo largo de la obra de Martí hay calificativos como  “…el invicto Goethe…” (5:183), “…con su prosa serena…” (12:112). Hay menciones a sus poemas Hermann y Dorotea  (15:457), Diván de Oriente y Occidente (5:469), Mignon (18:266); a sus dramas: Egmont, Clavijo (15:456), Las afinidades electivas (15:457) y muy especialmente a su Fausto (5:103),  “...el Fausto sublime de Goethe (21:38), a su juicio: "... la mejor obra del hombre después de Prometeo.”(15:356) Su identificación con esta obra es tal, que en su artículo sobre La Galería Stebbins en The Hour de Nueva York el 17 de abril de 1880 al describir el cuadro del pintor francés Alfred Jacomin Fausto y Mefistófeles, dice: “… aunque notable en cuanto al modelado y el colorido, está pintado demasiado vulgarmente para representar un asunto tan elevado. Mefistófeles, que parece un viejo estudiante de Heidelberg, apenas podría poseer los dones de seducción suficientes para mover el espíritu superior de Fausto; y el "Doctor" en sí, parece un ser despreocupado y bondadoso, ciertamente no es el hombre exaltado, consumiéndose por el fuego inextinguible, que nos describió Goethe.”(19:276) El 5 de diciembre de 1879 Martí anotó sus impresiones de la representación de Fausto en el Teatro Real de Madrid (4). Para mayor información remitimos al interesado al esmerado ensayo de Vales y Hernández: La presencia de Goethe en la obra y en el ideario martiano.(5)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 86. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp. 

(2) Samuel Smiles, ob. cit., p.93.

 (3) Martí, José 1936. Adúltera. Drama inédito. Introducción, notas y apéndice por Gonzalo de Quesada y Miranda, Editorial Trópico, La Habana, pp. 16- 17.

(4) Centro de Estudios Martianos 2003. Atlas de José Martí, Ediciones Geo, La Habana, p. 48

(5) José Francisco Vales Bermúdez y Susana Hernández Rodríguez 2008. La presencia de Goethe en la obra y en el ideario martiano. Sitio Web: La página de José Martí. Sitio Web: http://www.josemarti.org

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Goldoni

Nombre completo: Carlo Goldoni

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Dramaturgo italiano

Época: 1707-1793

Obra citada indirectamente: Comedia (1715)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe: “…and Goldoni, the comic poet, when only eight, made a sketch of his first play. Goldoni was a sad scapegrace. He repeatedly ran away from school and college to follow a company of strolling players. His relations from time to time dragged him away, and induced him to study law, which he afterwards practised at Pisa with considerable success; but the love of the stage proved too strong for him, and he eventually engaged himself as stage poet, and continued to write comedies for the greater part of his life.(1) Martí traduce: “…y Goldoni, que era muy revoltoso, compuso a los ocho su primera comedia. Muchas veces se escapó Goldoni de la escuela para irse detrás de los cómicos ambulantes. Su familia logró que estudiase leyes, y en pocos años ganó fama de excelente abogado, pero la vocación natural pudo más en él, y dejó la curia para hacerse el poeta famoso de los comediantes.”(18:395) En su traducción Martí hace algunos cambios interesantes como sustituir “poeta cómico” por “que era muy revoltoso” al referirse al Goldoni de ocho años. Además añade al final una idea diferente a la de Smiles al calificarlo como “el poeta famoso de los comediantes.” Su nombre aparece en una lista de artistas italianos en los Fragmentos de Martí (22:127). En los Fragmentos, de Martí hay un listado alfabético con el encabezamiento "Diccionario" donde aparece el nombre de Goldoni  junto al de otras 16 personalidades, cada una con un número al lado que parece ser los números de páginas correspondientes (22:127).


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp. 

Carlo Goldoni

Guercino

Nombre completo: Giovanni Francesco Barbieri

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor italiano

Época: 1591-1666

Obra citada directamente: Dibujo de una virgen de 1601

Comentarios: Guercino se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -según hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men,  Smiles escribe: Guercino, when only ten years old, painted a figure of the Virgin on the front of his father's house, which was greatly admired; it exhibited the genius of which he afterwards displayed so many proofs.” (1) Para su Músicos poetas y pintores, Martí sintetiza y traduce: “Guercino a los diez años adornó con una virgen de fino dibujo la fachada de su casa.” (18:394) Solo hemos hallado una referencia sobre este artista en la obra martiana en su ensayo sobre el pintor español Mariano Fortuny, publicado en inglés en The Sun de Nueva York el 27 de marzo de 1881, donde menciona la que está considerada la obra maestra de Guercino: El enterramiento de Santa Petronila (28:124), actualmente  en los Museos Capitolinos de Roma.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri

Haendel

Nombre completo: Georg Friedrich Händel

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor alemán

Época: 1685-1759

Obras citadas directamente: Almira/ El Mesías

Comentarios: Sobre este músico, Smiles escribió: “This was especially the case with the great master, Handel, who composed a set of sonatas when only ten years old. His father, a doctor, destined him for the profession of law, and forbade him to touch a musical instrument. He even avoided the boy to a public-school, for there he would be in taught the gamut. But young Handel´s passion for music could not be restrained. He found means to procure a dumb spinet, concealed it in a garret, and went to practice upon the mute instrument while the household were asleep. The Duke of Saxe-Weissenfels at length became acquainted with the boy´s passion, and interceded with his father. It was only then that he was permitted to follow the bent of his genius. In his fourteenth year Handel played in public; in his sixteenth year he set the drama of Almeria to music; in the following year he produced Florinda and Nerone. While at Florence, in his twenty-first year, he composed his first opera, Rodrigo; and at London, in his twenty-sixth year, he produced his famous opera of Rinaldo. He continued to produce his works operas and oratorios; and in 1741, when in his fifty-seventh year, he composed his great work, The Messiah, in the space of only twenty-three days. In the case of Handel, the precocity of the boy exercised no detrimental influence upon the compositions of the man; for his very greatest works were produced late in life, between his fifty-fourth and sixty-seventh year.” (1) Martí, solamente dice: “Haendel a los diez años había compuesto un libro de sonatas. Su padre lo quería hacer abogado, y le prohibió tocar un instrumento; pero el niño se procuró a escondidas un clavicordio mudo, y pasaba las noches tocando a oscuras en las teclas sin sonido. El duque de Sajonia Weissenfels logró, a fuerza de ruegos, que el padre permitiera aprender la música a aquel genio perseverante, y a los dieciséis Haendel había puesto en música el Almira. En veintitrés días compuso su gran obra El Mesías, a los cincuenta y siete años, y cuando murió, a los sesenta y siete, todavía estaba escribiendo óperas y oratorios.” (18:391) Al traducir el texto de Smiles (que tiene 248 palabras), Martí hace un verdadero alarde de síntesis, dejando lo esencial en 106 palabras, simplificando el contenido y eliminando tres obras (Florinda, Nerone, Rodrigo y Rinaldo).  Martí conocía y valoraba la obra de Handel, según indican estas referencias en su obra. Desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas de mayo 23 de 1882 reseña un festival de música en Nueva York y comenta: “Allí se oyeron de Haendel imponente, el Israel en Egipto…” (9:312) En sus notas sobre Emilio Agramonte en Patria del 30 de abril de 1892 “…la música ha de crear, como en Haendel…” (5:308)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 77. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Óleo inconcluso de Händel

de William Hogarth (1695)

Haydn

Nombre completo: Franz Joseph Haydn

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor austríaco

Época: 1732-1809

Obra citada directamente: Die Schöpfung (La Creación)

Comentarios:  El texto original de Samuel Smiles en  Great young men dice así:  "Haydn was almost as precocious a musician as Handel, having composed a mass at thirteen; yet the offsprings of his finest genius were his latest compositions, after he had become a sexagenarian. The Creation, probably his greatest work, was composed when he was sixty-five." (1). En Músicos poetas y pintores, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles, Martí dice refiriéndose al músico Haydn: “Haydn fue casi tan precoz como Haendel, y a los trece años ya había compuesto una misa; pero lo mejor de él, que es La Creación, lo escribió cuando tenía sesenta y cinco.” (18:391). Al comparar el texto de Martí con el original inglés en la valoración de La Creación, vemos que donde Smiles solo había dicho "probablemente su mejor trabajo..." ("probably his greatest work..."), Martí afirmó que era lo mejor de él, incluyendo así sus propios criterios sobre esta obra.  Desde Patria el 30 de abril de 1892 llamaría a la música de Handel de "...música de la más fina y creadora..."  (5:308) En La Opinión Nacional del 5 de noviembre de 1881, a manera de alarma, escribe la noticia de que  “Para construir, en Londres, un hotel inmenso, al estilo norteamericano, con 400 cuartos, se tendrá que derribar entre otras casas históricas, la casa en que Haydn escribió la mayor parte de La Creación. (23:64)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 78. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Franz Joseph Haydn

en 1799 por John Carl Rossler

Heinecken

Nombre completo: Christian Friedrich Heinecken

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Niño prodigio alemán

Época: 1721–1725

Obra citada: Ninguna

Comentarios: Heinecken se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: “The boy Heinecken of Lubeck learned the greater part of the Old and New Testament in his second year; he could speak Latin and French in his third year; he studied religion and the history of the Church in his fourth year; and finally, being excitable and sickly, he fell ill and died in his fifth year. Of this poor child it might be said, in Bacon's words that "Phaeton´s car went but a day.” (1) Martí traduce: “Heinecken, el niño de la antigua ciudad de Lubeck, aprendió de memoria casi toda la Biblia cuando tenía dos años; a los tres años, hablaba latín y francés; a los cuatro ya lo tenían estudiando la historia de la iglesia cristiana, y murió a los cinco. De esa pobre criatura puede decirse lo de Bacon: “El carro de Faetón no anduvo más que un día.” (18:391) Heinecken es una referencia obligada en los casos de los niños prodigio de la historia, de quien se dice que habló a las pocas horas de haber nacido. Este y otros datos sugieren una extraordinaria habilidad para absorber y verbalizar el conocimiento abstracto que causó el asombro en su época. No hemos hallado otras referencias de este personaje en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 76. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Vista de la ciudad de Lubeck cuna de Heinecken el niño prodigio

John 

Nombre completo:  Bailie John of Hunter Square

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Condicípulo de Sir Walter Scott

Época:  1771-1832          

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: John se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -según ya hemos aclarado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men Smiles escribe: " "Two boys," says Carlyle, " were once of a class in the Edinburgh Grammar School : John, ever trim, precise, and dux; Walter, ever slovenly, confused, and dolt. In due time, John became Bailie John of Hunter Square, and Walter became Sir Walter Scott of the Universe." (1) Martí traduce: "Dice Carlyle que en una clase de la escuela de gramática de Edimburgo había dos muchachos: “John, siempre, hecho un brinquillo, correcto Y ducal; Walter, siempre desarreglado, borrico y tartamudo. Con el correr de los años, John llegó a ser el Regidor John, de un barrio infeliz, Y Walter fue Sir Walter Scott, de todo el universo.” (18:400)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 94. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Sir Walter Scott   

 

Keats

Nombre completo: John Keats         

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta inglés          

Época: 1795-1821     

Obras citadas directamente: Ninguna

Comentarios: En Great young men, como parte de la reseña que Samuel Smiles hace de Keats leemos: “… John Keats, the greatest and brightest genius of them all, published his first volume of poetry at twenty-one and his last at twenty-four, shortly after which he died. Yet Keats was by no means precocious at his earliest years. When a boy at school, he was chiefly distinguished for his terrier-like pugnacity; and his principal amusement was fighting. Though he was a general and insatiable reader, his mind showed no particular bias until he reached his sixteenth year, when the perusal of Spenser´s Faëry Queen set his mind on fire, and reading and writing poetry became the chief employment of his short existence.” (1) En una encantadora descripción, Martí traduce: “Keats, el más grande de los poetas jóvenes de Inglaterra, murió a los veinticuatro años, ya célebre. Pero nadie hubiera podido decir en su niñez que había de ser ilustre por su genio poético aquel estudiantuelo feroz que andaba siempre de peleas y puñetazos. Es verdad que leía sin cesar; aunque no pareció revelársele la vocación hasta que leyó a los dieciséis años la Reina Encantada de Spenser: desde entonces sólo vivió para los versos.” (18:398) Más adelante en el artículo durante la reseña de Shelley, Martí hace mención a Keats donde no lo había hecho Smiles al añadir a la narración de la muerte accidental de Shelley “…murió ahogado, con un tomo de versos de Keats en el bolsillo.” (18:398)  Más adelante en Great young men Smiles vuelve a mencionar a Keats durante la reseña de Byron como referencia a uno de sus contemporáneos y a su semejanza en la fiereza del carácter, lo cual Martí también traduce, en este caso,  textualmente: "Byron fue otro genio extraordinario y errante de la misma época de Shelley y de Keats." (18:399)  En la obra martiana hay varias referencias a John Keats. En sus notas periodísticas desde La Opinión Nacional el 17 de noviembre de 1881 hablando de Dante Gabriel Rosseti y Oscar Wilde dice: “…en ambos se nota la influencia de un poeta que derivó sus versos de la naturaleza, y no los deformó con preocupaciones de escuela: Keats.” (23:84) En el mismo diario el 24 de enero de 1882 vuelven a aparecer sus valoraciones del poeta Keats: “Pocos nombres hay tan notorios en la moderna literatura inglesa como el del triste Shelly o el de Keats…” (23:168) En su ensayo sobre Oscar Wilde de La Nación de Buenos Aires del 10 de diciembre de 1882 habla de “…Keats, el poeta exuberante y plástico…” (15:363), el abundoso Keats (15:368), quien sacudía de “…su lecho de piedra la poesía y la pintura…” (15:364), quien “… decía que sólo veneraba a Dios, a la memoria de los grandes hombres y a la belleza.” (15:365) En su artículo Repertorios, revistas y mensuarios literarios y científicos de Nueva York en La América de Nueva York de febrero de l884 comenta sobre el último ejemplar del The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine donde aparece un trabajo “…sobre el armonioso y aurialado poeta inglés Keats.” (13: 433). En su cuaderno de apuntes número 18 hay un acápite titulado Crítica, y opiniones críticas donde aparece: “De Keats afirmó la Quaterly Review que sus versos habían sido recibidos con un “roar of laughter.” (21:421)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 91. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

John Keats

Klopstock

Nombre completo: Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta alemán

Época: 1724-1803

Obra citada directamente: La Mesíada

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe una reseña de 69 palabras sobre Klopstock: “The genius of Klopstock, too, showed itself equally early. He was at first a rompish boy, then an impetuous student, an enamoured youth, and an admired poet. He conceived and partly executed his Messiah before he had reached his twentieth year, though the three first cantos were not published until four years later. The Messiah excited an extraordinary degree of interest, and gave an immense impetus to German literature.” (1) Martí  reduce su reseña a 34 palabras y traduce lo esencial:Klopstock, que desde niño fue impetuoso y apasionado, comenzó a escribir su poema de La Mesíada a los veinte años.” (18:395) Solamente hemos hallado una referencia a este autor en el resto de la obra martiana. En el Cuaderno apuntes número 7 leemos unas palabras que parecen tomadas de alguna versión de la conocida traductora Aloyse Christine, Baronesa de Carlowitz, donde menciona al poeta alemán y tres de sus obras: “Klopstock canta en la Mesíada la emancipación de la especie humana, y la de Alemania en su tragedia Herrman. En los Bardites, el antiguo valor germano. “Baronne A. de Carlowitz.” (21:212)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 85. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock

Koerner

Nombre completo: Carl Theodor Köerner

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y soldado alemán

Época: 1791-1813

Obras citadas directamente: Schwertlied (El Canto de la Espada)  

Comentarios:  En la obra original en inglés Great young men, Smiles escribió: "Korner also, the ardent and the brave, met the death which he envied on the field of battle, for his country's liberties at the early age of twenty-two. As a boy, he was sickly and delicate; yet he was possessed by the true poetic faculty. At nineteen he published his first book of poems; and he wrote his last piece, The Song of the Sword, only two hours before the battle in which he fell." (1) Martí brinda una muestra de su capacidad de síntesis y traduce y adapta el contenido de Smiles de la siguiente forma: “El bravo poeta Koerner murió a los veinte años como quería él morir, defendiendo a su patria. Era enfermizo de niño, pero nada contuvo su amor por las ideas nobles que se celebraban en los versos. Dos horas antes de morir escribió El Canto de la Espada. “(18:396)  Nótese como Martí al hacer su traducción enfatiza los ideales patrióticos unido al genio creador, en consecuencia con sus  concepciones sobre la función social del artista. No hallamos otras referencias sobre este poeta alemán en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 86. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Carl Theodor Köerner

Kotzebue

Nombre completo: August Friedrich Ferdinand von Kotzebue       

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Dramaturgo alemán         

Época: 1761-1819     

Obras citadas indirectamente: Poema (1768) y estreno de tragedia (1779)

Comentarios: En Great young men, como parte de la reseña que Samuel Smiles hace de Kotzebue leemos: “Kotzebue was another instance of precocious dramatic genius. He made attempts at poetical composition when about six years old, and at seven he wrote a one-page comedy. He used to steal into the Weimar Theatre.Then he could not obtain admittance in the regular way, and hide himself behind the big drum until the performances began. His chief amusement consisted in putting together toy theatres, and working puppet personages on the stage. His first tragedy was privately acted at Jena, where he was a student, in his eighteenth year. A few years later, while living at Revel, he produced, amongst other pieces, the drama so well known in England as The Stranger.” (1)  Martí traduce casi textualmente pero elimina el título de su obra The Stranger: “El alemán Kotzebue fue otro genio dramático precoz. A los siete años escribió una comedia en verso, de una página. Entraba como podía en el teatro de Weimar, y cuando no tenía con qué pagar se escondía detrás del bombo hasta que empezaba la representación. Su mayor gusto era andar con teatros de juguete y mover a los muñecos en la escena. A los dieciocho años se representó su primera tragedia en un teatro de amigos.” (18:397)  En el resto de la obra martiana solo hemos hallado una referencia a este autor. En Carta a Néstor Ponce de León de 1891 le informa: “Carmita nos presta su sala para que leamos mañana sábado “El Entremés” o “El Lugareño en la Corte”, que ha compuesto sobre una comedia de Kotzebue nuestro Sr. San Félix.” (20: 386)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 88. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp. 

August Friedrich Ferdinand

von Kotzebue       

Leonardo

Nombre completo: Leonardo de Vinci         

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Arquitecto, escultor, pintor, inventor e ingeniero italiano           

Época: 1452-1519     

Obras citadas: Figura del ángel en El bautismo de Cristo      

Comentarios: En Great young men,  Smiles escribe: “Leonardo da Vinci gave early indications of his remarkable genius. He was skilled in arithmetic, music, and drawing. When a pupil under Verrocchio, he painted an angel in a picture by his master on the "Baptism of Christ”. It was painted so exquisitely that Verrocchio felt his inferiority to his pupil so much, that from that time forth he gave up painting in despair. When Leonardo reached mature years his genius was regarded as almost universal. He was great as a mathematician, an architect and engineer, a musician, and a painter.” (1) Martí traduce: “Leonardo de Vinci sobresalió desde la niñez en las matemáticas, la música y el dibujo. En un cuadro de su maestro Verrocchio, pintó un ángel de tanta hermosura que el maestro, desconsolado de verse inferior al discípulo, dejó para siempre su arte. Cuando Leonardo llegó a los años mayores era la admiración del mundo, por su poder como arquitecto e ingeniero, y como músico y pintor.” (18:394) La traducción de Martí es bastante ajustada al original con la eliminación del nombre del cuadro de Verrocchio. El bautismo de Cristo se considera el primer trabajo importante de Leonardo da Vinci como aprendiz, colaborando con su maestro Verrocchio en la elaboración de la pintura. Esta anécdota que relata Smiles y traduce Martí aparece en la página 22 del libro Las Vidas de los más excelentes pintores, escultores y arquitectos del arquitecto y pintor italiano Giorgio Vasari (2) libro que por cierto, es citado por Martí en su artículo Galería de Colón en Patria el 16 de abril de 1893 (5:205) En la obra referida, Vasari menciona la intervención de Leonardo en el cuadro y afirma que Verrocchio acabó disgustado, al sentirse superado por su propio aprendiz. La leyenda cuenta que llegó a romper sus pinceles prometiendo no volver a pintar nunca jamás. Si bien esto último no es cierto, la anécdota ejemplifica el talento temprano de Leonardo como pintor. Se le atribuyen a Leonardo varias intervenciones en esta obra, pero se le reconoce indiscutiblemente el ángel que está de perfil, abajo a la izquierda, arrodillado y recogiendo sus ropas, donde se evidencia el dinamismo y la delicadeza de su mano. En la obra martiana hay varias referencias a Leonardo. En su borrador de El desnudo en el salón menciona “…las obras decisivas y solemnes de Vinci…” (12:256)  y en su crónica de igual nombre, publicada en The Hour de Nueva York, el 31 de julio de 1880 dice entonces “…las obras severas y sobresalientes de Da Vinci.” (19:264)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 172-173. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.    

(2) Giorgio Vasari 1878. Leonardo da Vinci Pp. 2-53.  En: Le vite de'più eccellenti pittori, scultori ed architettori. Con nuove annotazioni e commenti di Gaetano Milanesi. Firenze G.C. Sansoni, 652 pp.

Leonardo de Vinci 

El bautismo de Cristo de  Verrocchio, donde Leonardo dibujo el ángel de perfil arrodillado a la izquierda.

Detalle del ángel dibujado por Leonardo en El bautismo de Cristo de  su maestro Verrocchio

Portada del libro de Vasari donde se relata la anécdota de Leonardo y su maestro Verrochio, que  transcribimos a continuación:

"Acconciossi dunque, come è detto, per via di ser Piero, nella sua fanciullezza all' arte con Andrea del Verrocchio, il quale facendo una tavola dove San Giovanni battezzava Cristo, Lionardo lavorò un angelo che teneva alcune vesti; e benché fosse giovanetto, lo condusse di tal maniera, che molto meglio delle figure d'Andrea stava l'angelo di Lionardo; il che fu cagione ch'Andrea mai più non volle toccar colori, sdegnatosi che un fanciullo ne sapesse più di lui..." (Giorgio Vasari En: Leonardo da Vinci. Le vite de'più eccellenti pittori, scultori ed architettori, p. 22)

Lope  de Vega

Nombre completo: Felix Lope de Vega y Carpio    

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor, poeta y dramaturgo español      

Época: 1562-1635     

Obras citadas directamente: Arcadia          

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Lope de Vega and Calderon, two of the most prolific of dramatists, began writing very early the one at twelve, the other at thirteen. The former recited verses of his own composition, which he wrote down and exchanged with his playfellows for prints and toys. At twelve, by his own account, he had not only written short pieces, but composed dramas. His heroic pastoral of Arcadia was published at eighteen. He was with the Spanish Armada, in its assault upon England in 1588. He was then in his twenty-sixth year; and in the course of that perilous and fruitless voyage, he wrote several of his poems. But it was after he returned to Spain and entered the priesthood that he composed the hundreds of plays through which his name has become so famous.” (1) Martí sintetiza y traduce: “Lope de Vega y Calderón, que son los que más han escrito para el teatro, empezaron muy temprano, uno a los doce años y otro a los trece. Lope cambiaba sus versos con sus condiscípulos por juguetes y láminas, y a los doce años ya había compuesto dramas y comedias. A los dieciocho publicó su poema de la Arcadia, con pastores por héroes. A los veintiséis iba en un barco de la armada española, cuando el asalto a Inglaterra, y en el viaje escribió varios poemas. Pero los centenares de comedias que lo han hecho célebre los escribió después de su vuelta a España, siendo ya sacerdote.” (18:396). Hay varias referencias a Lope de Vega en la obra martiana. En su ensayo Poesía Dramática Americana publicado en Guatemala en febrero de 1878 habla del “…renaciente teatro español, por Lope dado a vida…” (7:176) También hay menciones a sus personajes, como Doña Sol (12:62) de La corona merecida y Dorotea (12:54) de la obra de igual nombre.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 61-62. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Félix Lope de Vega y Carpio

Lorenzo de Médicis

Nombre completo: Lorenzo de Médici      

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Príncipe de Florencia y mecenas de las artes       

Época: 1449-1492     

Obras citadas directamente: Ninguna         

Comentarios: Lorenzo de Médici  se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. Como parte de la biografía de Miguel Angel Buonarroti, Samuel Smiles escribe en Great young men: “Young Buonarotti's improvement was so rapid that he not only surpassed the other pupils of his master, but also the master himself. But the sight of the statues in the gardens of Lorenzo de Medici so inflamed his mind that, instead of being a painter, he resolved on devoting himself to sculpture.” (1) Martí traduce: "Al poco tiempo el aprendiz pintaba mejor que el maestro; pero vio las estatuas de los jardines célebres de Lorenzo de Médicis, y cambió entusiasmado los colores por el cincel.” (18:394) No hemos hallado otras referencias a este personaje en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp.82. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp. 

Lorenzo de Médici

Macaulay

Nombre completo: Thomas Babington Macaulay    

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta, historiador y político inglés          

Epoca: 1800-1859     

Obras citadas indirectamente: Critical and Historical Essays      

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles cita a Macaulay cuando hace la reseña de Congreve, pero Martí no lo traduce. Más adelante durante la reseña de Byron vuelve a mencionarlo y es éste el párrafo que Martí tradujo. Dice Smiles: “At twenty-five," said Macaulay, “he found himself on the highest pinnacle of literary fame, with Scott, Wordsworth, Southey, and a crowd of other distinguished writers at his feet.” (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores, Martí traduce este párrafo: “A los veinticinco años", dice Macaulay, "se vio Byron en la cima de la gloria literaria, con todos los ingleses famosos de la época a sus pies.” (18:399) Aunque en La Edad de Oro no hay ninguna referencia a la obra de Macaulay, el texto mencionado alude al Volumen II de sus Críticas y Ensayos Históricos (Critical and Historical Essays) publicado en 1843 donde en su ensayo sobre Byron titulado Moore's Life of Lord Byron, dice textualmente: “At twenty-four, he found himself on the highest pinnacle of literary fame, with Scott, Wordsworth, Southey, and a crowd of other distinguished writers beneath his feet. There is scarcely an instance in history of so sudden a rise to so dizzy an eminence.” En el resto de la obra martiana hay nueve referencias de este autor  donde hallamos estas palabras de elogio: “…Lord Macaulay, que escribió tan buena historia de Inglaterra y estudios sobre grandes hombres…” (23:142)  


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 92. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp. 

Thomas Babington Macaulay    

Mendelssohn

Nombre completo: Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy    

Actividad/Nacionalidad: Pianista, director de orquesta y compositor de música clásica alemán.    

Época: 1809-1847           

Obras citadas directamente: Las Bodas de Camacho/ Sueño de una Noche de Verano/ Sinfonía de Reforma

Comentarios: En Great young men,  Smiles escribe: “Mendelssohn tried to play almost before he had learned to speak. He wrote three quartettes for the piano, violin, and violoncello before he was twelve years old. His first opera, The Wedding of Comacho, was produced in his sixteenth year, his sonata in B flat at eighteen, his Midsummer Night's Dream before he was twenty, his Reformation Symphony at twenty-two, and all his other great works by the time that he reached his thirty-eighth year, when he died.” (1) Martí traduce: "Mendelssohn aprendió a tocar antes que a hablar, y a los doce años ya había escrito tres cuartetos para piano, violines y contrabajo: dieciséis años cumplía cuando acabó su primera ópera Las Bodas de Camacho; a los dieciocho escribió su sonata en si bemol; antes de los veinte compuso su Sueño de una Noche de Verano; a los veintidós su Sinfonía de Reforma, y no cesó de escribir obras profundas y dificilísimas hasta los treinta y ocho, que murió.” (18:393) En sus Apuntes para los debates sobre  el idealismo y el realismo en el arte, leemos: “A las veces, a la mitad del día, he sentido al lado de un piano el crepúsculo dentro de mi alma:-¿Qué tocaban? Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn…” (19:410)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 79-80.  En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy a los 12 años, óleo de Carl Joseph Begas

Mendelsson dibujado por

Eduard Magnus (1875)

Metastasio

Nombre completo: Pietro Metastasio    

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor y poeta italiano      

Época: 1698-1782 

Obras citadas: Ninguna 

Comentarios: Metastasio se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya se ha explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribió una breve reseña de Metastasio con estas palabras: "Metastasio, when a boy of ten, improvised in the streets of Rome…” (1). En Músicos, poetas y pintores, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles, Martí mantiene la brevedad de la reseña y dice: “De diez años andaba Metastasio improvisando por las calles de Roma…” (18:395). En la obra de Martí solo hallamos una referencia a Metastasio en sus Fragmentos, en un listado alfabético con el encabezamiento "Diccionario" donde aparece el nombre de Metastasio junto al de otras 16 personalidades, cada una con un número al lado que parece ser los números de páginas correspondientes (22:127)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Pietro Metastasio  

  

Meyerbeer

Nombre completo: Yaakov Liebmann Beer/ Giacomo Meyerbeer

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor y músico alemán

Época: 1791-1864

Obras citadas directamente: Jephtas Gelübte (La hija de Jephté)/ Robert le diable (Roberto el Diablo)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribió: "Meyerbeer was another musical prodigy. He was an excellent pianist at nine. He began to compose at ten, and at eighteen his first dramatic piece, Jephtha's Daughter, was publicly performed at Munich; but it was not until he had reached his thirty-seventh year that he produced his great work, Robert le Diable, which secured for him a world-wide reputation.” (1) Martí sintetiza y traduce: "Meyerbeer era a los nueve pianista excelente, y a los dieciocho puso en el teatro de Munich su primera pieza La Hija de Jephté; pero hasta los treinta y siete no ganó fama con su Roberto el Diablo.” (18:393) En la obra martiana hay referencias a personajes de las óperas de Meyerbeer como Dinorah (9:114,115) de la ópera de igual nombre, o Valentina, personaje de Los Hugonotes (12:36); así como directamente a sus óperas La Africana, (21:112), Los Hugonotes (23:183) y Roberto El Diablo (5:296,297). Sobre este “...poderoso instrumentista…” (7:154) como le llamó Martí, conocemos sus opiniones en su Cuaderno de apuntes número 3 donde, tras disfrutar de La Africana, escribe: “Maravillosa, maravillosa música la del cuarto acto. -No es bien estimada porque no puede ser fácilmente interpretada.- Gran alma se ha menester para entender aquella inmensa alma. Luego de estudiar y comparar, tengo a Meyerbeer por Miguel Ángel y Shakespeare en la música. Genio de la fuerza -en la riña, en el odio -en la ternura.  A una nube preñada de rayos voló el final del tercer acto, aquel incendio y ataque del buque. ¿No es tal vez el cuarto acto de La Africana el trozo más imponente y perfecto de música que se conoce?” (21:112). Más adelante en el propio cuaderno habla de la música de Meyerbeer “…arrancada a la naturaleza externa, con la que como que compenetra y ajusta la emoción interior…” (21:124)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Giacomo Meyerbeer

Miguel Ángel

Nombre completo: Miguel Angel Buonarroti    

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor y escultor italiano

Época:  1475-1564

Obras citadas directamente: Batalla de los centauros/ David/ Obras de la Capilla Sixtina/ Amor dormido

Obra citadas indirectamente: Batalla de Cascina

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribió: "The greatest instance of all that of Michael Angelo, showed the tendency of his genius. He was sent into the country when a child, tote nursed by the wife of a stone-mason, which led him to say in" after years that he had imbibed a love of the mallet and chisel with his mother's milk. From his early years he displayed an intense passion for drawing. As soon as he could use his hands and fingers, he covered the walls of the stonemason's house with his rough sketches, and when he returned to Florence he continued his practice on the groundfloor of his father's house. When he went to school he made little progress with his books, but he continued indefatigable in the use of his pencil, spending much of his time in haunting the atelieri of the painters. The profession of an artist being then discreditable, his father, who was of an ancient and illustrious family, first employed moral persuasion upon his son Michael, and that failing, personal chastisement. He passionately declared that no son of his house should ever be a miserable stone-cutter. But in vain; the boy would be an artist, and nothing else. The father was at last vanquished, and reluctantly consented to place him as a pupil under Ghirlandaio. That he had by that time made considerable progress in the art is evident by the fact that his master stipulated in the agreement (printed in Vasari's Lives) to pay a monthly remuneration to the father for the services of his son. Young Buonarotti's improvement was so rapid that he not only surpassed the other pupils of his master, but also the master himself. But the sight of the statues in the gardens of Lorenzo de Medici so inflamed his mind that, instead of being a painter, he resolved on devoting himself to sculpture. His progress in this branch of art was so great that in his eighteenth year he executed his basso-relievo of "The Battle of the Centaurs"; in his twentieth year his celebrated statue of "The Sleeping Cupid"; and shortly after his gigantic marble statue of "David." Reverting to the art of painting, he produced some of his greatest works in quick succession. Before he reached his twenty-ninth year he had painted his cartoon, illustrative of an incident in the wars of Pisa, when a body of soldiers, surprised while bathing, started up to repulse the enemy. Benvenuto Cellini has said that he never equalled this work in any of his subsequent productions." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce: "El más glorioso de todos es Miguel Ángel. Cuando nació lo mandaron al campo a criarse con la mujer de un picapedrero, por lo que decía él después que había bebido el amor de la escultura con la leche de la madre. En cuanto pudo manejar un lápiz le llenó las paredes al picapedrero de dibujos, y cuando volvió a Florencia, cubría de gigantes y leones el suelo de la casa de su padre. En la escuela no adelantaba mucho con los libros, ni dejaba el lápiz de la mano; y había que ir a sacarlo por fuerza de casa de los pintores. La pintura y la escultura eran entonces oficios bajos, y el padre, que venía de familia noble, gastó en vano razones y golpes para convencer a su hijo de que no debía ser un miserable cortapiedras. Pero cortapiedras quería ser el hijo, y nada más. Cedió el padre al fin, y lo puso de alumno en el taller del pintor Ghirlandaio, quien halló tan adelantado al aprendiz que convino en pagarle un tanto por mes. Al poco tiempo el aprendiz pintaba mejor que el maestro; pero vio las estatuas de los jardines célebres de Lorenzo de Médicis, y cambió entusiasmado los colores por el cincel. Adelantó con tanta rapidez en la escultura que a los dieciocho años admiraba Florencia su bajorrelieve de la Batalla de los Centauros; a los veinte hizo el Amor Dormido, y poco después su colosal estatua de David. Pintó luego, uno tras otro, sus cuadros terribles y magníficos. Benvenuto Cellini, aquel genio creador en el arte de ornamentar, dice que ningún cuadro de Miguel Ángel vale tanto como el que pintó a los veintinueve que unos soldados de Pisa, sorprendidos en el baño por sus enemigos, salen del agua a arremeter contra ellos.”  (18:393)   Más adelante cuando Martí habla de Rafael menciona, como igual había hecho Smiles,  "...las obras grandiosas de Miguel Ángel en la Capilla Sixtina..." (18:394) En conjunto se mencionan directamente los nombres de cuatro obras de Miguel Ángel e indirectamente se hace alusión a su cuadro de 1504, Batalla de Cascina, que coincide con la descripción hecha por Martí pues su imagen recoge los hechos acaecidos en las cercanías de Cascina cuando los soldados se despojen de sus armas y se bañen en el Río Arno, momento aprovechado por los pisanos para atacar. La reseña de Miguel Ángel aparece acompañada de una figura en óvalo con su nombre al pie. Esta imagen parece provenir del retrato de Miguel Ángel realizado por Marcello Venusti hacia 1535, durante las obras de la Capilla Sixtina, la cual -con retoques y ajustes- ha sido reproducida numerosas veces. Miguel Ángel cuenta con gran número de referencias en la obra martiana. Una de sus más poderosas valoraciones sobre este artista la hallamos en la Revista Universal, México, en noviembre 9 de 1875: “Había en Miguel Ángel algo de génesis y de apocalipsis. Asemejó los troncos a los hombres; arraigó con raíces membranosas, tórax y cabezas humanas. Da, con este sombrío atrevimiento de la forma, idea de esta suprema esclavitud en que, con facultades para concebirlo todo, todo huye, todo escapa, todo reprime, espanta, y enloquece…” (15:80) En noticias sobre Italia de La Opinión Nacional de Caracas el 17 de noviembre de 1881 concluye diciendo: “Donde ...[...]... esculpió Buonarroti, alcanzó el hombre su más grande altura.” (14:194) En su poema Sed de belleza dice: Dadme lo sumo y lo perfecto: dadme/ Un dibujo de Angelo..." (16:165) En sus fragmentos leemos: “He de escribir cuatro libros: Rafael, Miguel Ángel, Voltaire, Rousseau.” (22:246)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 81-82. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Retrato de Miguel Ángel de

Marcello Venusti (1535).

Batalla de los centauros

Detalle de La Batalla de Cascina

Estatua de David

Vista general Capilla Sixtina

Músicos poetas y pintores

Ilustración página 391

 

Milton

Nombre completo: John Milton            

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y ensayista inglés         

Época: 1608-1674        

Obras citadas directamente: Comus          

Comentarios: En Great young men Samuel Smiles escribe: “Spenser published his first poem, The Shepherd's Calendar, at twenty-six, and Milton composed his masque of Comus at about the same age, though he had already given indications of his genius.” (1) Martí solo traduce: “Milton tendría veintiséis años cuando escribió su Comus.” (18:397) Smiles hace posteriormente dos menciones más de Milton al compararlo con Cowley y al comentar la relación entre la producción y la madurez de los artistas, pero Martí no las incorpora a Músicos poetas y pintores. En la obra martiana hay varias referencias a Milton. En su Sección Constante de La Opinión Nacional el 28 de marzo de 1882 hablando sobre el pintor húngaro Munkacsy, escribe: “Una de sus obras celebradas es el cuadro en que el triste Milton, ciego, lleno de dolores de familia, y sentado en su sillón ancho de roble y cuero, dicta a sus hijos los versos del Paraíso Perdido.” (23: 243) En la Revista Universal de México en septiembre 2 de 1875 menciona el Adán de Milton…” (6:320) Desde Patria el 19 de enero de 1895 menciona el poema pastoral de Milton Il Penseroso (5:466) En su ensayo sobre Henry Ward dice: “…Milton, austero como su San Juan…” (13:37) y en La Nación de Buenos Aires el 24 de julio de 1885, en una comparación, dice: “…profundo como Milton…” (10:263) En sus fragmentos incluye entre los poemas a recordar uno de Milton: “Poesías inglesas y de los E.U. que debo recordar: Jim Bludso…” (22:276). En su cuaderno de apuntes número 4 cita un fragmento del poema San Juan Bautista de Milton (21:136) y en el número 18 hay anotaciones sobre críticas a Milton y su Paraíso perdido. (21:421) 


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 89. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

John Milton     

Moisés     

Nombre completo: Moisés  

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Profeta para el judaísmo, el cristianismo y el islam

Época: No existen datos históricos que fundamenten la existencia real de Moisés   

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios:  Moisés se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, como parte de la reseña biográfica del poeta Schiller. Al respecto, en su Capítulo III Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Schiller was inspired to poetic composition by reading Klopstock's poem; his mind was turned in the direction of sacred poetry; and by the end of his fourteenth year he had finished an epic poem entitled "Moses." (1) Martí traduce: “Schiller leyó la Mesíada a los catorce años, y se puso a componer un poema sacro sobre Moisés.” (18:396)  La traducción de Martí  sustituye "un poema de Klopstock" como dice Smiles, por la Mesiada. El poema sacro de Schiller mencionado se titula en alemán Die Sendung Moses que puede traducirse como La misión de Moisés. Hay varias referencias a Moisés en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas. (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 86. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Moisés  

Moliere     

Nombre completo: Juan Bautista Poquelín  

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Dramaturgo francés        

Época: 1622-1673     

Obras citadas directamente: L'Étourdi (The Blunderer)   

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe: “Moliere's education was of the slenderest description; but he overcame the defects of his early training by diligent application; and in his thirty-first year he brought out his first play, L'Etourdi. The whole of his works were produced between then and his fifty-first year, when he died.“ (1) Para su Músicos, poetas y pintores, Martí traduce simplemente: “Moliére tuvo que educarse por sí mismo; pero a los treinta y un años ya había escrito El Atolondrado.” (18:396) La reseña de Moliere aparece acompañada de una figura en óvalo con su nombre al pie. Esta imagen tiene una interesante historia -que se recorre en las imágenes adjuntas- y parte del cuadro pintado por Nicolas Mignard en Avignon en 1658. Al respecto se cuenta que a mediados de noviembre de 1657, Molière y sus compañeros fueron a Avignon y buscando un sitio para su representación hallaron la cancha de tennis (“jue de paume”) techada del pintor Nicolás Mignard (este tipo de instalaciones frecuentemente servían para representaciones teatrales) estableciéndose una relación de amistad de la cual salieron bocetos y el famoso retrato de Molière en el papel del César. Más tarde esta pintura fue tomada como referencia por Charles-Antoine Coypel (1694-1752) para su retrato de Moliere, que a su vez fue reproducido en grabado en 1734 por François-Bernard Lepicié. En la obra martiana hay abundantes referencias a Moliere. Hay menciones a sus obras como El médico a palos (7:145) o a éstas, a través de sus personajes, bien sea un estereotipo como “…una bribona de Molíere…” (7:415) o “…el avaro de Moliere…” (6:450); o un carácter teatral creado como Sganarelle (7:29) de El cornudo imaginario; Tartufo (11:172) de la obra de igual nombre; Harpagón (14:276) de El Avaro; Jourdain (25:229) de El Burgués Gentilhombre; o Marcarilla (15:269) de Las Preciosas ridículas. Desde The Hour Nueva York el 12 de junio de 1880 habla de la nueva ilustración de Moliere hecha por el grabador e ilustrador francés Gustavo Dore (15:313) y en el mismo diario, cuatro meses antes, el 17 de abril de 1880 hace su crítica sobre La Galería Stebbins y comenta el cuadro: Luis XIV desayunándose con Moliere del pintor y escultor francés Jean-Léon Gérôme, donde dice sobre Moliere:El poeta está sentado a la mesa, sonriendo graciosamente, pero con humildad conveniente, como si estuviera algo turbado por estos honores inesperados.” (19:274) En su ensayo sobre Puskin en The Sun en Nueva York el 28 de agosto de 1880 habla de “…estrofas “…tan mordaces como las de Moliere…” (15:417) En sus notas periodísticas sobre Francia desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas en 1882 nos resume el valor de Moliere  en la dramaturgia nacional“…la casa de Moliére, que es el Teatro Francés…” (15:269)


Notas. (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 87. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Retrato de Moliere en el papel de César, cuadro de Nicolas Mignard (1658)

Moliere de Charles Antoine Coypel (1694-1752) a partir del cuadro de Nicolas Mignard

Grabado de François-Bernard Lepicié (1734 ) basado en Coypel

Músicos poetas y pintores

Ilustración página 396

 Luis XIV desayunándose con Moliere

de Jean-Léon Gérôme

 

Moore

Nombre completo: Thomas Moore

Actividad/ Nacionalidad:  Poeta romántico irlandés

Época: 1779-1852

Obras citadas directamente: Irish Songs (Melodías Irlandesas)/ Traducción de Anacreonte/ Lalla Rookh/ Life of Lord Byron (Vida de Byron)

Comentarios: Moore aparece dos veces tanto en la versión de Smiles como en la de Martí.  La primera vez Smiles escribe: “Moore, the Irish poet, has observed, that nearly all the first-rate comedies, and may of the first-rate tragedies, have been the productions of young men.” (1)  Martí traduce: “Moore, el poeta de las Melodías Irlandesas, dice que casi todas las comedias buenas y muchas de las tragedias famosas han sido obras de la juventud.” (18:396),  Nótese la adición de Martí de las Melodías irlandesas, no mencionadas por Smiles, con una intención de complementación cultural. Más adelante vuelve a aparecer en Great young men con mayor extensión cuando Smiles escribe: “Thomas Moore was another precocious poet. He was a pretty boy; Joseph Atkinson, one of his early friends, spoke of him as an infant Cupid sporting on the bosom of Venus. He wrote love verses to Zelia at thirteen, and began his translation of Anacreon at fourteen. At that age he composed an ode about "Full goblets quaffing,” and "Dancing with nymphs to sportive measures, led by a winged train of pleasures, “' that might have somewhat disconcerted his virtuous mother, the grocer's wife. But Moore worked his way out of luscious poetry ; and the Dublin Anacreon at length became famous as the author of the Irish Melodies, Lalla Rookh, The Epicurean, and the Life of Byron.” (2) Martí, crea una versión sintética, despojada de los detalles que tiene el contenido original de Smiles y traduce: “El irlandés Moore componía a los trece versos buenos a su Celia famosa, y a los catorce había  empezado a traducir del griego a Anacreonte. En su casa no sabían qué significaban aquellas ninfas, aquellos placeres alados, y aquellas canciones al vino. Moore se libró pronto de estos modelos peligrosos, y alcanzó fama mejor con los versos ricos de su Lalla Rookh y la prosa ejemplar de su Vida de Byron.” (18:398) En la obra martiana hay varias menciones directas a Moore y a personajes de Lalla Rookh, que Martí tradujo, según consta en textos como su carta a Enrique Estrazulas del 19 de febrero de 1888: “Pronto va a salir, con ilustraciones magnas, mí traducción del Lalla Rookh.” (20:189). Flores Varona  nos ofrece su ensayo sobre esta traducción martiana que no llegamos a leer.  En Carta a Manuel de la Cruz de Nueva York, el 3 de junio de 1890, Martí nuevamente hace alusión a su versión del poema y nos da las valoraciones que le acercan al poeta irlandés: “¿Me permite ...[...]...mandarle las primicias de mi traducción de Moore, en Ia parte que pueda conmover el corazón cubano, que es aquel de los cuatro poemas del Lalla Rookh donde pinta penas como las de Cuba, con el amor que él tenía a su Irlanda? El poema va traducido en verso blanco, por voluntad del editor y no por la mía; no porque no ame yo el verso blanco, como que escribo en él, para desahogar la imaginación, todo lo que no cabría con igual fuerza y música en la rima violenta; sino porque a Moore no se le puede separar de su rima, y no es leal traducirlo sino como él escribió, alardeando del consonante rico, y embelleciendo a su modo con colgaduras y esmaltes, los pensamientos.” (5:180-181) En su diario de Montecristi a Cabo Haitiano del 3 de marzo de 1895 comentando un libro que habla sobre la madre de Moore volvería a recordar: “…donde el hijo cristiano comenzó, fue por la traducción picante y feliz de las odas de Anacreonte.” (19:204).


Notas. (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 87. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Smiles 1931. ob. cit. pp. 90-91.

Thomas Moore

Moreau       

Nombre completo: Moreau   

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Crítico francés  

Época: Hacia 1800-1885              

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: Moreau se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya hemos explicado- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, durante las reseñas de los poetas franceses, Samuel Smiles escribe: "The contemporary poets of France were then nearly all young men. "No writer," said the sarcastic critic Moreau," is now respected in France if he is above eighteen years of age." (1) Martí traduce: "Casi todos los poetas franceses de su tiempo eran muy jóvenes. “En Francia", decía en burla el crítico Moreau, “ya no hay quien respete a un escritor si tiene más de dieciocho años” (18:397) No hemos hallado más información de este personaje secundario que aparece colateralmente cuando se describen todos los escritores jóvenes de Francia.


Notas (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 88. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Mozart

Nombre completo: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor austríaco             

Época: 1756-1791            

Obras citadas directamente: Finta Semplice/ Requiem/ Mitríades        

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “But of all the musical prodigies the greatest was Mozart. He seems to have played apparently by intuition. At four years old he composed tunes before he could write. Two years later he wrote a concerto for the clavier. At twelve he composed his first opera, La Finta Semplice. Even at this early age he could not find his equal on the harpsichord. The professors of Europe stood aghast at a boy who improvised fugues on a given theme, and then took a ride-acock-horse round the room on his father's stick. Mozart was a show-boy, and was taken by his father for exhibition in the principal cities of Europe, where he was seen in his little puce-brown coat, velvet hose, buckled shoes, and long flowing curly hair tied behind. His father made a good deal of money out of the boy's genius. Regardless of his health, which was extremely delicate, he fed him with excitement. Yet the boy was full of uproarious merriment when well. Though he was a master in music, he was a child in everything else. His opera of Mithridates, composed at fourteen, was performed twenty times in succession; and, three years later, his Lucia Silla had twenty-six successive representations. These were followed by other great works the Idomeneo, written at twenty-five; the Figaro, at thirty; the Don Giovanni, at thirty-one; the Clemenza di Tito and the Zauberflote, at thirty-five; and the Requiem, at thirty-six. He wrote the last work on his death-bed. He died in 1792, worn out by hard, or rather by irregular work and excessive excitement. The composer of the Requiem left barely enough to bury him.” (1) Martí traduce: “Pero de todos los niños prodigiosos en el arte de la música, el más célebre es Mozart. No parecía que necesitaba de maestros para aprender. A los cuatro años, cuando aún no sabía escribir, ya componía tonadas; a los seis arregló un concierto para piano, y a los doce ya no tenía igual como pianista, y compuso la Finta Semplice, que fue su primera ópera. Aquellos maestros serios no sabían cómo entender a un niño que improvisaba fugas dificilísimas sobre un tema desconocido, y se ponía enseguida a jugar a caballito con el bastón de su padre. El padre anduvo enseñándolo por las principales ciudades de Europa, vestido como un príncipe, en su casaquita color de pulga, sus polainas de terciopelo, sus zapatos de hebilla, y el pelo largo y rizado, atado por detrás como las pelucas. El padre no se cuidaba de la salud del pianista pigmeo, que no era buena, sino de sacar de él cuánto dinero podía. Pero a Mozart lo salvaba su carácter alegre; porque era un maestro en música, pero un niño en todo lo demás. A los catorce años compuso su ópera de Mitrídates, que se representó veinte noches seguidas; a los treinta y seis, en su cama de moribundo, consumido por la agitación de su vida y el trabajo desordenado, compuso el Requiem, que es una de sus obras más perfectas.” (18:392) La traducción de Martí es bastante fiel aunque de las 273 palabras de Smiles solo deja 229. Elimina cinco obras (Lucia Silla, Idomeneo, Figaro, Don Giovanni, Clemenza di Tito y Zauberflote) y al referirse al  Requiem, añade su propia valoración “que es una de sus obras más perfectas.” La reseña de Mozart aparece acompañada de una figura en óvalo con su nombre al pie. Esta imagen parece provenir del alguna reproducción del cuadro pintado por  la artista alemana Doris Stock (1789). Se cuenta que en abril de 1879  cuando Mozart se encontraba dando conciertos en Dresden como parte de una gira en Alemania, hizo una visita social a casa de los Körner y allí Stock halló la ocasión de hacer su retrato con una técnica de dibujo llamada punta de plata. Este retrato, que fue el último de Mozart ha sido objeto -con ligeros retoques y ajustes- de numerosas reproducciones. Hay varias referencias sobre Mozart en la obra de Martí. En su artículo sobre White en la Revista Universal de México con fecha 12 de junio de 1875, leemos: “Y llegó al fin el quinteto de Mozart. ¿A qué escribir con palabras? Aquello se ama y se suspira, aquello se oye y se respeta, y se siente con la ternura exquisita con que Mozart lo engendró y escribió.-Rompió Mozart por entre la densa atmósfera racional que tan alto grado alcanzó en la  mitad segunda del siglo XVIII. Lanzaban de sí los poetas y los filósofos toda pura doctrina espiritual: explicaba Condillac su sistema de sensaciones, y Voltaire su incredulidad convencional; ahogábase el alma bella del artista en aquel espacio mortal y mezquino;-y guardó en sus notas los suspiros del alma abandonada, y compuso sus obras con las lágrimas del espíritu huérfano. Ni un instante cejó en su empeño la vida siempre activa del imperecedero autor de Nozze. -Su música es una especie de lamentos de ángeles.” (5:301) En su Folleto Guatemala publicado en El Siglo XIX en México en 1878 califica la música "...del dificilísimo Mozart…” (7:154) En su cuaderno de apuntes número 7 aparece esta anotación “No sabía yo que Mozart hubiese estado enamorado de Sofía Arnould” (21:213)


Notas (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 78-79. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Mozart pintado por  la artista alemana Doris Stock (1789)

Músicos poetas y pintores

Ilustración página 396

Paganini

Nombre completo: Niccolo Paganini

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor y violinista italiano

Época: 1782-1840

Obra citada indirectamente:  Sonata de 1790

Comentarios: Paganini se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que -como ya explicamos- constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Smiles  dice: “Paganini played the violin at eight, and composed a sonata at the same age.” (1) En Músicos poetas y pintores, Martí mantiene exactamente la misma idea en su traducción, pero en una oración más sintética: “A los ocho tocaba Paganini en el violín una sonata suya.” (18:393) Aunque no se menciona ninguna obra en particular de Paganini hay una alusión a su primera sonata de 1790 a la edad de ocho años, pero no hemos hallado ninguna información sobre la misma, si es que está registrada en alguna parte, pues se trata de una obra temprana de su niñez. Tampoco hallamos referencias de este músico italiano en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Niccolo Paganini

Pope

Nombre completo: Alexander Pope

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta inglés

Época: 1688-1744

Obras citadas directamente: The Dunciad (La Borricada) / Ode on Solitude (Oda a la Soledad) / Pastorals  (Pastorales) /  Traducción de La Ilíada

Comentarios: Este personaje se cita dos veces en La Edad de Oro.  Aparece por primera vez en el artículo La Ilíada de Homero donde, en referencia a las traducciones de esta obra,  leemos: “En inglés hay muy buenas traducciones, y el que sepa inglés debe leer la Ilíada de Chapman, o la de Dodsley, o la de Landor, que tienen más de Homero que la de Pope, que es la más elegante.” (18:331)  En los apuntes de Martí sobre Europa se menciona dicha traducción. (15:453) Pope se menciona también en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, el texto de Smiles referido a Pope dice textualmente: “Pope also "lisped in numbers," While yet a child, he aimed at being a poet, and formed plans of study. Notwithstanding his perpetual headache and his deformity, the results of ill-health, he contrived to write clever verses. The boy was father of the man; the author of The Dunciad began with satire, and at twelve he was sent home from school for lampooning his tutor. But he had better things in store than satire. Johnson says that Pope wrote his Ode on Solitude in his twelfth year, his Ode on Silence at fourteen, and his Pastorals at sixteen, though they were not published until he was twenty-one. He made his translation of the Iliad between his twenty-fifth and thirtieth year. (1) La traducción de Martí es más sintética: “Pope "empezó a hablar en versos": su salud era mísera y su cuerpo deforme, pero por más que le doliera la cabeza, los versos le salían muchos y buenos. El que había de idear La Borricada volvió un día a su casa echado de la escuela por una sátira que escribió contra el maestro. Samuel Johnson dice que Pope escribió su oda a La Soledad a los doce años, y sus Pastorales a los dieciséis: de los veinticinco a los treinta, tradujo la Ilíada.  (18:397). En la obra martiana hay otras referencias a Pope. En su cuaderno de apuntes número 18 aparece esta cita:  “True ease in writing comes from art, not chance/ As those move easiest who have learned to dance…” (21: 416) que es un fragmento de la Parte II de An Essay on Criticism, de Pope publicado en 1711. En su traducción de Antigüedades griegas y romanas leemos: “Pope, que fue un gran poeta inglés, dijo esta frase, muy celebrada y repetida: “El estudio propio de la humanidad es el hombre”. (25: 266) Se refiere Martí a la frase: “The proper study of mankind is man” que aparece en la Epístola II de An Essay on Man, Moral Essays and Satires, publicada en 1732.


Notas. (1) Smiles, Samuel 1887. Chapter III. Great young men, pp. 84-85. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius 1888, Harper and Brothers, 384 pp.

Alexander Pope

Praxíteles

Nombre completo: Praxiteles

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escultor griego

Época: Hacia el 400-330 AC

Obra citada directamente: Estatua del Dios Apolo

Comentarios: Praxíteles se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. El texto original de Samuel Smiles, en Great young men, dice: “Each human being contains the ideal of a perfect man, according to the type in which the Creator has fashioned him, just as the block of marble contains the image of an Apollo, to be fashioned by the sculptor into a perfect statue.” (1)  En su artículo Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí nos dice: “Cada ser humano lleva en sí un hombre ideal, lo mismo que cada trozo de mármol contiene en bruto una estatua tan bella como la que el griego Praxiteles hizo del dios Apolo.” (18:390) Nótese además del estilo sintético de la traducción martiana, como se elimina la alusión religiosa al "Creador celestial" y se incorpora el nombre de un verdadero creador humano: el escultor griego Praxíteles, lo que además añade una nota más a la intención cultural de este artículo. El Apolo de Praxíteles se conoce más por réplicas romanas en mármol elaboradas a partir del original griego en bronce, cuyo destino se desconoce, si bien el Museo de Arte de Cleveland presenta datos de una estatua que podría ser la original. En las imágenes adjuntas se presentan algunas de estas estatuas. Existen dos referencias a este autor en el resto de la obra martiana. En sus fragmentos menciona “el tablero de Praxiteles” (22:98) y en sus Traducciones de Antigüedades Griegas al referirse a varias estatuas de la época menciona a “la de Eros de Praxiteles en Tespis...” (25:74)


Notas. (1) Smiles, Samuel 1887. Chapter III. Great young men, pp. 75. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius 1888, Harper and Brothers, 384 pp.

Copia del Apolo de Praxíteles

en el Museo del Louvre

Quintiliano

Nombre completo: Marco Fabio Quintiliano

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Retórico y pedagogo hispano-romano

Época: 35-95 DC

Obra citada indirectamente: Institutio Oratoria / Instituciones Oratorias

Comentarios: Quintiliano se menciona en La Edad de Oro en Músicos, poetas y pintores, artículo martiano que constituye una adaptación del Capítulo III Great young men del libro Life and Labour que publicó el escocés Samuel Smiles en 1887. En Great young men, Smiles  decía: “There be some,” said Bacon, “who have an over-early ripeness in their years, which fadeth betimes;” corresponding with the words of Quintilian: Inanibus aristis ante messem flavescunt.” (1)  En Músicos poetas y pintores, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles, Martí dice: “Hay algunos —dice el inglés Bacon— que maduran mucho antes de la edad y se van como vienen", que es lo mismo que dice en su latín elegante el retórico Quintiliano.” (18:391) Como puede, verse Martí elimina en su versión la cita de latín (2) e incorpora nuevos adjetivos que muestran sus propios criterios sobre Quintiliano y lo valorizan.  De hecho, en la obra martiana hay varias referencias elogiosas a “Quintiliano, el más famoso maestro de su tiempo…” (25:153), con su latín “… lleno de alamares y de lentejuelas…” (5:166)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 76. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) La cita en latín corresponde al Capítulo 3 del Libro I de Institutio Oratoria obra enciclopédica para formar a un orador que dio fama a Quintiliano. Puede traducirse como “florece antes del tiempo de la cosecha pero sin ningún grano.”

Marco Fabio Quintiliano

Rafael

Nombre completo: Rafael Sanzio             

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor y arquitecto italiano         

Época: 1483-1520           

Obras citadas directamente: Escuela de Atenas/ La Transfiguración                   

Comentarios:  En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Raphael was another wonderfully precocious youth, though his father, unlike Michael Angelo's, gave every encouragement to the cultivation of his genius. He was already eminent in his art at the age of seventeen. He is said to have been inspired at the sight of the great works of Michael Angelo, which adorned the Sistine Chapel at Rome. With the candour natural to a great mind he thanked God that he had been born in the same age with so great an artist, Raphael painted his "School of Athens" in his twenty-filth year, and his "Transfiguration" at thirty-seven, when he died. This picture was carried in the funeral procession to his grave in the Pantheon; though left unfinished, it is considered to be the finest picture in the world.” (1) Para su Músicos poetas y pintores Martí traduce casi textualmente: “La precocidad de Rafael fue también asombrosa, aunque su padre no se le oponía, sino le celebraba su pasión por el arte. A los diecisiete años ya era pintor eminente. Cuentan que se llenó de admiración al ver las obras grandiosas de Miguel Ángel en la Capilla Sixtina, y que dio en voz alta gracias a Dios por haber nacido en el mismo siglo de aquel genio extraordinario. Rafael pintó su Escuela de Atenas a los veinticinco años y su obra Transfiguración a los treinta y siete. Estaba acabándola cuando murió, y el pueblo romano llevó la pintura al Panteón, el día de los funerales. Hay quien piensa que La Transfiguración de Rafael, incompleta como está, es el cuadro más bello del mundo.” (18:394) La obra de Martí está llena de referencias a Rafael. Hay varias alusiones de belleza y serenidad evocando a Rafael o a imágenes de sus cuadros. En Amistad funesta emplea los términos “…una virgen de Rafael…” (18:213) y “…dulce como una cabeza del mismo Rafael.” (18:224) En Horas de lluvia habla de una criatura “…que tenía la cara a la manera de los óvalos divinos…” de Rafael. En la Revista Universal de México el 28 de agosto de 1875 hace una semblanza física de la poetisa cubana Luisa Pérez de Zambrana donde dice: “…y para sí hubiera querido Rafael el óvalo que encierra aquella cara noble, serena y distinguida." (8:310) También aparece Rafael cuando quiere dimensionar el talento de otros artistas, como  el español “Goya, que dibujaba cuando niño con toda la dulcedumbre de Rafael…” según aparece en sus crónicas sobre arte en La Nación de Buenos Aires el 17 de agosto de 1886. (19:304) O el francés Paul Delaroche: “… el pintor que supo llenar de luz las sombras, y crear, como Rafael la virgen madre, la virgen Dolorosa…” (23:154) según leemos en La Opinión Nacional del 16 de enero de 1882. También viene a colación Rafael para ejemplificar, como hace desde la Revista Universal de México en noviembre 9 de 1875, una enseñanza: “Una gran imperfección garantiza un gran mérito. ¿No tiene acaso un brazo imperfecto el hermoso gladiador de Rafael? (15:79) Con igual intención leemos en una crítica de arte en The Hour de Nueva York, el 5 de junio de 1880: “Una pierna está algo desdibujada, pero ¿no desdibujó el propio Rafael una pierna en el “Spasímo”? (19:286) En The Hour de Nueva York, el 5 de junio de 1880, menciona el cuadro El Pasmo de Sicilia de Rafael con el nombre “Spasimo” (19:286) y vuelve a mencionarlo  en La Opinión Nacional de Caracas el  4 de octubre de 1881, en sus Escenas europeas. (14:99) En el mismo diario hay otra mención a Rafael en enero de 1882. Al dar sus noticias del Vaticano habla de los alabarderos, con  “…el alegre vestido de franjas rojas, amarillas y negras que inventó Rafael para ellos…” (14:309)  Varios escritos de Martí hablan de su valoración de Rafael Sanzio y su obra. En sus notas sobre el pintor Madrazo dice: “Mirad los cuadros de Rafael: ¡son el Paraíso! “ (15:149) o “Fijémonos en los cuadros de Rafael -todos son paradisíacos.” (15:154) En sus fragmentos leemos: “He de escribir cuatro libros: Rafael, Miguel Ángel, Voltaire, Rousseau.” (22:246) En sus apuntes para los debates sobre el idealismo y el realismo en el arte, leemos: “¿Cuál fue el cuadro más bello? El de Rafael, de fijo…”  (19:428) Finalmente, en el cuento Horas de Lluvia lo define como “…aquel hijo predilecto de Dios que llaman los pintores Rafael” (2) 


 Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 82-83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) José Martí 1981 Horas de lluvia. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, p. 8

Autorretrato de Rafael Sanzio

La Escuela de Atenas de Rafael

La Transfiguración de Rafael

Robert Browning

Nombre completo: Robert Browning

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y dramaturgo inglés

Época: 1812-1889

Obra citada directamente: Paracelsus

Comentarios: En Great young men, tras hacer la reseña de Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Smiles añade:  "...while Robert Browning, her husband, published his Paracelsus at twenty-three." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce textualmente  “…Robert Browning, su marido, publicó el Paracelso a los veintitrés.” (18:399)  Martí se refiere a su extenso poema dramático Paracelsus de 1835, dividido en cinco escenas o grupos de escenas, cada una de las cuales representa momentos críticos de la vida del conocido médico y alquimista suizo Paracelsus y sus amigos (Festus, Michal y Aprile) a través de una serie de monólogos. Numerosas referencias en la obra martiana hablan de su reconocimiento por este poeta. En sus notas periodísticas desde La Opinión Nacional el 24 de enero de 1882  aparecen sus valoraciones: “…en un estudio reciente sobre las primeras obras del más poderoso poeta que tiene hoy Inglaterra, Robert Browning, y que fueron, por cierto, muy maltratadas las unas, o calladas las otras, como si se las quisiese espantar con la burla, y sofocar con el silencio,-se lee que una bondadosa señora que quiso regalar a Browning las obras de Shelley, que son ahora clásicas, las buscó en vano en todas las librerías de Londres, donde era desconocido el nombre del poeta, muerto ya hacía tres años, y las halló al fin en una tienda de humilde apariencia, con las de “un John Keats”, que le recomendó el buen librero.” (23:168) En The Sun de Nueva York del 26 de noviembre de 1880, expresa:  “En todos los países los frutos del alma guardan analogía con los de la naturaleza. En Inglaterra, tierra de nieblas, aparece Browning…” (15:25)  Muere Browning el  12 de diciembre de 1889 y en La Nación de Nueva York, en enero 13 de 1890, Martí lo recuerda como “…el inglés profundo y confuso que acaba de morir…” (13:456)  En uno de sus cuadernos de apuntes hay una referencia al Paracelso de 1835 de Browning que se menciona en La Edad de Oro (21:409)


 Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 93. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Robert Browning

 

Robert Burns

Nombre completo: Robert Burns       

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor escocés      

Época: 1759-1796            

Obras citadas directamente: Canciones montañesas        

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles menciona a Burns en dos oraciones separadas, donde dice: “…Burns, though rather a dull boy, began to rhyme at sixteen…” y más adelante: “Robert Burns published his first volume in the same year." (1) Martí simplemente traduce: “Robert Burns, el poeta escocés, escribía ya a los dieciséis años sus encantadoras canciones montañesas.” (18:398) Posteriormente, Smiles menciona a Burns durante la reseña de Scott, pero Martí no lo incluye. La reseña de Burns aparece acompañada de una figura en un marco redondeado con con su nombre al pie. Esta imagen tiene una interesante historia -que se recorre en las imágenes adjuntas- y parte del cuadro pintado por Alexander Nasmyth en 1787, el cual sirvió de inspiración al dibujo de Archibald Skirving, que a su vez fue la base del grabado de  John Beugo que ha sufrido -con cambios, ajustes y retoques, multiples reproducciones y es la que aparece en La Edad de Oro. Hay varias referencias a Burns en el resto de la obra martiana. La más extensa aparece en sus crónicas en La Nación de Buenos Aires del 7 de febrero de 1889, donde comenta la fiesta de los escoceses: "Luego fue el día festivo de los escoceses, congregados en torno al asta de cintas, que el escocés al danzar trenza y enreda, para bautizar, a la sombra de los árboles de otoño, y en día lluvioso por cierto, la estatua de su poeta, de su Robert Burns, a Robert Burns, a quien la buena Peggy, de crenchas amarillas y pies desnudos, era tan cara “como el otoño al labrador y la llovizna a las flores. Ricos y nobles se reunieron, con la cabeza descubierta, para honrar al que, en vida, sólo por cortesía descubrió la suya ante ellos, al que vivió libre y soberbio, prefiriendo el ahogo a la limosna, y el potaje del aprendiz a la zozobra del poeta cortesano; al que no pisó salas de duque, sino cuando por la fama de su genio pudo entrar en ellas de corona a corona; al que no se vendió a la majestad por puestos ni pensiones, ni quiso grados de pedantería, ni, latines inflados y griegos de imitación, sino el doctorado que aprendió en la virtud del alma, con una moza de la montaña por maestro, vagando juntos en los agostos ardorosos: por donde se baila, canta y ara; al que fue a la vez, con la mano en la pértiga honrada de Ayr, Beranger y Tibulo. Como hermano defendía arrogante a las “muchachas plebeyas” del desdén de las ricas, con sus estrofas por escudo, aunque de los versos de su abogado era de quien necesitaban defensa ellas, porque no tenían las aldeanas fuertes y amorosas de Ayrshire amigo más exigente y tierno que el que en vez de “ir con los rebaños divinos a pastar en los yerbales ortodoxos”, ni a escribir prosa venal o rimas palaciegas con el arte que le enseñaban el tordo enamorado y el alba húmeda, se iba, liga al jarrete y manta al hombro, inventando versos, a los fresales de Ballechmyle, donde Nannie lo espera, o a la orilla del río, a decir a la orgullosa Tibbie que no “le importa un pelo” que le mire mal por pobre, o a la vereda del maizal, donde no lo tendrán en menos porque ande despacio, al rumor del maíz, abrazando el talle de Peggy, fino como un arco joven. Y hay en todo lo de Burns majestad como de cumbre, y la tristeza de los grandes: que viene de vivir entre los hombres sin poder moderarles la fealdad, ni librarse de ellos.” (12:111-112) En una de sus Escenas Norteamericanas en La Nación de Buenas Aires del 11 de octubre de 1888, dice:  “…el poeta Burns, que con ser hijo de la tierra se sentía coronado…” (12:43)


 Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 90 En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Robert Burns   

Cuadro de Robert Burns, óleo de Alexander Nasmyth (1787)

Dibujo de Robert Burns de Archibald Skirving, inspirado en el cuadro de Alexander Nasmyth

Grabado de Robert Burns por 

John Beugo, a partir del dibujo

de  Archibald Skirving.

Músicos poetas y pintores

Ilustración página 398

 

Rossini

Nombre completo: Gioachino Rossini

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Compositor italiano

Época: 1792-1868

Obra citada directamente: Tancredo                           

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles escribe: “Rossini's father was a horn-player in the orchestra of a strolling company of players, of which his mother was a second-rate actress and singer. At the age of ten young Rossini played second horn to his father. He afterwards sang in choruses until his voice broke. At eighteen he composed Cambiale di Matrimonio, his first opera; and three years later he composed his Tancredi, which extended his fame throughout Europe.” (1) Martí al traducir, elimina la obra Cambiale di Matrimonio y sintetiza: El padre de Rossini tocaba el trombón en una compañía de cómicos ambulantes, en que la madre iba de cantatriz. A los diez años Rossini iba con su padre de segundo; luego cantó en los coros hasta que se quedó sin voz; y a los veintiún años era el autor famoso de la ópera Tancredo.” (18:393) Hay algunas referencias a Rossini en la obra martiana. En La Opinión Nacional de Caracas del 26 de noviembre de 1881, Martí califica: “…esa música quebrada, vibrante, chispeante de Rossini…” (9:115) En La Nación de Buenos Aires del 6 de junio de 1884, donde alaba a la famosa soprano española Adelina Patti, menciona la ópera Semiramis de Rossini, cantada por ella con todo éxito en Nueva York  (10:47).


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young man. Pp. 80-81. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Retrato de Gioachino Rossini,

de Vincenzo Camuccini

(Museo del Teatro de la Escala

de Milán, Italia)

Adelina Patti como Semiramis

en la ópera de Rossini

Samuel Johnson

Nombre completo: Samuel Johnson

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y ensayista inglés

Época: 1709-1784          

Obras citadas indirectamente: Life of Pope (La Vida de Pope)       

Comentarios: En Great young men, Samuel Smiles incluye la figura de Johnson como crítico y escribe: “Johnson says that Pope wrote his Ode on Solitude in his twelfth year, his Ode on Silence at fourteen, and his Pastorals at sixteen, though they were not published until he was twenty-one. He made his translation of the Iliad between his twenty-fifth and thirtieth year.” (1) Martí al traducir elimina la Oda al silencio y completa el nombre del personaje pues Smiles solo había usado el apellido: “Samuel Johnson dice que Pope escribió su oda a La Soledad a los doce años, y sus Pastorales a los dieciséis: de los veinticinco a los treinta, tradujo la Ilíada. (18:397) Aunque no hay referencia directa a ninguna obra de Samuel Johnson, las citas mencionadas aluden a su libro Life of Pope de donde extraemos estas oraciones: "The earliest of Pope's productions is his Ode on Solitude, written before he was twelve." (2) "He sometimes imitated the English poets, and professed to have written at fourteen, his poem upon Silence..." (3) "In the next year (1713) he published "Windsor Forest; of which part was, as he relates, written at sixteen, about the same time as his Pastorals..." (3) "... in somewhat more than five years he completed his version of the Iliad, with the notes. He began it in 1712, his twenty-fifth year, and concluded it in 1718, his thirtieth year." (4) Hay algunas referencias a Johnson en el resto de la obra martiana. En su cuaderno de apuntes número 18 aparece esta nota: “-A Johnson, a Samuel Johnson, el editor a quien propuso su “Irene” lo mandó “a cargar baúles”. (21:397) En el mismo cuaderno aparece: “En la vida no suele suceder como a Johnson: que, buscando  manzanas se encontró con un Petrarca. Lo general es que, buscando Petrarcas, nos encontremos con manzanas.” (21:400) Se refiere Martí a una anécdota de la juventud de Johnson que cuenta que buscando una manzana en su casa tropezó con un libro de Petrarca, de donde adquirió el gusto por los romances que caracterizó toda su obra. (5)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young man. Pp. 90. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Johnson 1899. Life of Pope. Macmillan And Co., Limited,. New York, p.4

(3) Samuel Johson. Idem.

(3) Samuel Johson. Ob. cit, p. 15

(4) Samuel Johson. Ob. cit, p. 22.

(5) Helen Deutsch 2005. Loving Dr. Johnson. The University of Chicago Press,  p.150

Samuel Johnson    

Samuel Smiles

Nombre completo: Samuel Smiles

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Biógrafo y reformista escocés

Época: 1812-1904

Obra traducida y presentada: Life and labour Chapter III Great young men

Comentarios: En el mes de agosto de 1889 aparece en La Edad de Oro un artículo dedicado a grandes figuras de la cultura universal, anunciado por Martí desde el número de julio como: “Niños  famosos: de Samuel Smiles, con retratos" (18:300) y que en el propio número de agosto sale bajo el título de Músicos, poetas y pintores, con la siguiente sinopsis: "Anécdotas de la vida de los hombres famosos, traducidas del último libro de Samuel Smiles, con cuatro retratos: Miguel Angel, Mozart, Moliére y Robert Burns, el poeta escocés." (18:353) Este interesante artículo, de ocho páginas y cuatro láminas, fue elaborado por Martí, a partir del Capítulo III Grandes jóvenes (Great young men) del libro de Samuel Smiles Life and Labour (Vida  y Trabajo), que contiene un total de diez capítulos y que fue publicado por su autor en 1887 como continuación de una larga serie de libros de tendencia moralista. Poco sabemos de las opiniones de Martí sobre Smiles pues no hallamos referencias de este autor en el resto de la obra martiana, pero existen varios aspectos básicos que avalan su selección. Con una doctrina moralista enmarcada en la ética normativa. Samuel Smiles era una figura prestigiosa en la literatura inglesa, autor de  numerosos libros y un reconocido biógrafo. Los valores de carácter universal que se desprenden de sus biografías, unido a la alta carga de cultura universal que encierran, son aspectos que debe haber valorado Martí quien además encontró -en el plano práctico- la rigurosa recopilación de autores, ordenada por especialidad  artística y localidad geográfica, que le serviría de materia prima para su adaptación. La comparación de las versiones de Smiles y Martí (1) revela un arduo trabajo por parte del Maestro si consideramos que el capítulo inglés tiene 59 páginas y el de Martí solo 8 páginas. Como recursos de adaptación, Martí seleccionó previamente los artistas (Smiles trata unos 106 de los cuales Martí dejó solo 70), eliminó y/o adicionó datos biográficos y obras, eliminó partes del texto original, añadió sus valoraciones personales –culturales e ideológicas- saltando todos los escollos de la moral clasista y religiosa de Smiles y lo armonizó todo con su magistral pedagogía, ofreciendo una muestra del arte universal y una demostración de la capacidad del hombre desde su más temprana edad.


Notas: (1) Herrera, A. 1989. Análisis comparativo de Niños Famosos de Samuel Smiles y Músicos, Poetas y Pintores de José Martí. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, La Habana, Cuba, 12: 235-247.

Samuel Smiles

Schiller

Nombre completo: Friedrich Schiller       

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta, dramaturgo, filósofo e historiador alemán          

Época: 1759-1805                               

Obras citadas directamente: Die Sendung Moses (La misión de Moisés)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “In Carlyle's Life of Schiller we find a curious account of Daniel Schubart..." (1) Martí traduce: “El inglés Carlyle habla en su Vida del Poeta Schiller de un Daniel Schubart..." (18:393) Esta es la primera mención que hacen de Schiller ambos autores. Más adelante viene la reseña de Schiller como artista, donde Smiles escribe: “Schiller's mind was passionately drawn to poetry at an early age. The story is told of his having been found one day, during a thunderstorm, perched on the branch of a tree, up which he had climbed, "to see where the lightning had come from, because it was so beautiful," This was very characteristic of the ardent and curious temperament of the boy. Schiller was inspired to poetic composition by reading Klopstock's poem; his mind was turned in the direction of sacred poetry; and by the end of his fourteenth year he had finished an epic poem entitled "Moses." (2) Martí traduce: “Schiller nació con la pasión por la poesía. Cuentan que un día de tempestad lo encontraron encaramado en un árbol adonde se había subido "para ver de dónde venía el rayo, ¡porque era tan hermoso!". Schiller leyó la Mesíada a los catorce años, y se puso a componer un poema sacro sobre Moisés.” La traducción de Martí mantiene lo esencial de la reseña con solo la mitad de las palabras y sustituye "un poema de Klopstock" como dice Smiles por la Mesiada. El poema sacro de Schiller mencionado se titula en alemán Die Sendung Moses que puede traducirse como La misión de Moisés. (18:396) Hay varias referencias a Schiller en el resto de la obra martiana. En la Revista Universal de México de agosto 23 de 1876 lo incluye entre los más grandes: “Es Calderón en el ingenio humano cima altísima, y allá en el cielo alto se hallan juntos, él y Shakespeare grandioso, a par de Esquilo, Schiller y el gran Goethe. Y a aquella altura: nadie más.” (6:439) En carta al Director de El Progreso de abril 29 de 1877, dice: “…la buena obra libre vale más que la obra esclava. Así escribieron Schiller y Virgilio…” (7:103) En sus Fragmentos del discurso que pronunció sobre las obras de Echegaray en el Liceo Artístico y Literario de Guanabacoa, el 21 de junio de 1879, leemos: "Vuele siempre el poeta, con alas manchadas de humanos defectos, sacúdase con celo de sus manchas, -pero si con ellas ha de volar, vuele siempre, vuele sin descanso, -buscando eternos tipos, que aún no logra, pero que ha de hallar al fin;- ¡Como aquellas de Eschylo, como aquellas de Schiller, como aquellas de Shakespeare!" (15:106)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp.80. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Smiles. Ob. cit  p. 86

Friedrich Schiller 

Scott

Nombre completo: Sir Walter Scott   

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor, poeta y editor inglés        

Época: 1771-1832     

Obras citadas directamente: Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (Cancionero de Escocia)/ Waverley             

Comentarios: En Great young men, la primera vez que se menciona a Scott es durante la reseña de Byron, cuando Smiles dice: “At twenty-five," said Macaulay, “he found himself on the highest pinnacle of literary fame, with Scott, Wordsworth, Southey, and a crowd of other distinguished writers at his feet.” Martí traduce textualmente: “A los veinticinco años", dice Macaulay, "se vio a Byron en la cima de la gloria literaria, con todos los ingleses famosos de la época a sus pies. Byron era ya más célebre que Scott, Wordsworth y Southey.” Más adelante vendrá la reseña biográfica de Scott que en la versión inglesa dice: "Scott was anything but a precocious boy. He was pronounced a Greek blockhead by his schoolmaster. Late in life, he said of himself that he had been an incorrigibly idle imp at school. But he was healthy, and eager in all boyish sports. His true genius early displayed itself in his love for old ballads and his extraordinary gift for storytelling. When Walter Scott's father found that the boy had on one occasion been wandering about the country with his friend Clark, resting at intervals in the cottages, and gathering all sorts of odd experience of life, he said to him, "I greatly doubt, sir, you were born for nae better than a gangrel scrape-gut."Of his gift for story-telling when a boy, Scott himself gives the following account: "In the winter play-hours, when hard exercise was impossible, my tales used to assemble an admiring audience round Lucky Brown´s fireside, and happy was he that could sit next to the inexhaustible narrator." Thus the boy was the forerunner of the man, and his novels were afterwards received by the world with as much delight as his stories had been received by his schoolfellows at Lucky Brown's. "Two boys," says Carlyle, "were once of a class in the Edinburgh Grammar School: John, ever trim, precise, and dux; Walter, ever slovenly, confused, and dolt. In due time, John became Bailie John of Hunter Square, and Walter became Sir Walter Scott of the Universe." Carlyle pithily says that the quickest and completest of all vegetables is the cabbage. The growth of Scott's powers was comparatively slow. He had reached his thirtieth year before he had done anything decisively pointing towards literature. He was thirty one when the first volume of his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border was published; and he had reached forty-three when he published his first volume of Waverly, though it had been partly written, and then laid aside, nine years before. Nor was Burns, though as fond as Scott of old ballads, by any means precocious; but, like him, he had strong health and a vigorous animal nature. Yet at eighteen or nineteen, as he himself informs us, the marvelous ploughboy' had sketched the outlines of a tragedy. Martí traduce: “Walter Scott tampoco fue precoz de niño. Su maestro dijo que no tenía cabeza para el griego, y él mismo cuenta que fue de muchacho muy travieso y holgazán; pero gozaba de mucha salud, y era gran amigo de los juegos de su edad. En lo primero en que se le vio el genio fue en su gusto por las baladas antiguas, y en su facilidad extraordinaria para inventar historias. Cuando su padre supo que había estado vagando por el país con su camarada Clark, metiéndose por todas partes, y posando en las casas de los campesinos, le dijo: -"¡Dudo mucho, señor, de que sirva Ud. más que para cola de caballo!". De su facilidad para los cuentos, el mismo Scott dice que en las horas de ocio de los inviernos, cuando no tenían modo de estar al aire libre, mantenía muchas horas maravillados con sus narraciones a sus compañeros de escuela, que se peleaban por sentarse cerca del que les decía aquellas historias lindas que no acababan nunca. Dice Carlyle que en una clase de la escuela de gramática de Edimburgo había dos muchachos: "John, siempre hecho un brinquillo, correcto y ducal; Walter, siempre desarreglado, borrico y tartamudo. Con el correr de los años, John llegó a ser el regidor John, de un barrio infeliz, y Walter fue Sir Walter Scott, de todo el universo". Dice Carlyle, con mucho seso, que la legumbre más precoz y completa es la col. A los treinta años no se podía decir de seguro que Scott tuviera genio para la literatura. A los treinta y uno publicó su primer tomo del Cancionero de Escocia, y no imprimió su novela Waverley hasta los cuarenta y tres, aunque la tenía escrita nueve años antes. Hay algunas referencias a Scott en la obra martiana. En su sección periodística de La Opinión Nacional el 13 de mano de 1882 comenta la obra del escritor Berthold Auerbach y dice: “Hay novelas, como las de…[…]… Walter Scott, que son encantadores libros de historia: con leerlos sí que no desperdiciamos nuestro tiempo.” (23:234) En carta a  Miguel Tedín de Nueva York el 17 de octubre 1889, emplea una frase que muestra su afinidad con el poeta inglés: “…la hermosura de Escocia, que es pueblo de los de mi molde, y cría a la vez el puente de York, y Scott y Burns.” (7:396) En su artículo Los cubanos de Jamaica y los revolucionarios de Haití, de Patria el 31 de marzo de 1894 utiliza una frase de Scott: -“Ningún tirador bueno -dijo Walter Scott- pierde en cuervos la pólvora”. (3:106)  La Biblioteca de la Universidad de Edimburgo tiene un Sitio Web dedicado a Sir Walter Scott.


Notas: (1)  Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 94. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Sir Walter Scott   

 

Shakespeare

Nombre completo: William Shakespeare

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Dramaturgo y poeta inglés

Época: 1564-1616

Obras citadas directamente: Venus y Adonis

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “So far as is known, Shakespeare wrote his first poem, Venus and Adonis- of which he speaks as "the first heir of my invention" -in his twenty-eighth year; he began writing his plays about the same time, and he probably continued to write them until shortly before his death, in his fifty-second year.” (1) Martí sintetiza y traduce: “El mismo Shakespeare llama "primogénito de su invención" al poema Venus y Adonis, que compuso a los veintiocho años.”(18:397) El vínculo de Martí con el poeta inglés empieza temprano, pues en 1866, trabaja en la traducción de Hamlet de Shakespeare, según leemos en sus fragmentos: "Allá 16 años hace, cuando tenía yo 13, revolvía con cierto desembarazo The American popular lessons, -e intenté la traducción del Hamlet. Como no pude pasar de la escena de los sepultureros, y creía yo entonces indigno de un gran genio que hablara de ratones, -me contenté con el incestuoso “A Mystery” de Lord Byron." (22:285)  La obra martiana está llena de referencias a Shakespeare. Se mencionan sus obras: Todo está bien si termina bien (22:224), Julio César (9:57), Macbeth (10:145; 15:234,239), Como gustéis (23:126), Romeo y Julieta (15:43,45; 21:110), Ricardo III (14:156), Otelo (5:206; 6:418; 8:395; 9:102; 11:376; 14:428; 21:327) y Hamlet (6:449; 8:439; 9:103, 118,234; 10:125,131; 11:376; 15:234,239; 16:166; 18:105; 21:114,115; 22:42,285; 25:344). Hay alusiones a los personajes principales de estas obras: Banquo (10:411) y Macbeth (9:116; 10:108; 15:233, 238; 16:316) de Macbeth, Beatriz (23:126) y Rosalinda (12:147) de Como gustéis, Bertram de Todo está bien si termina bien (22:224), Ricardo III (9:102) y Rey Lear (9:116, 396; 13:432; 23:63) de los dramas respectivos de igual nombre, Ofelia (6:300,325,429; 8:160; 9:119; 11:351; 15:43; 22:42, 288) y Hamlet (6:325, 429; 9:112,114,115,119,139; 10:440; 14:276; 15:41; 17:174; 21:418; 22: 280) de Hamlet, Desdémona (9:19; 23:21), Michael Cassio (9:116), Yago (9:115, 117; 10:29; 11:426,468), Edelmira (6:418) y Otelo (9:103,117,118; 11:376; 12:460; 23:21, 63) de Otelo, Montesco (15:269), Romeo (9:118,125; 15:51; 19:345, 21:216; 23:63,90) y Julieta (8:156,205; 9:125; 15:51; 21:216; 22:269; 23:90) de Romeo y Julieta. Algunos personajes devienen en símbolos humanos de virtudes y defectos esenciales: Yago “…falso, envidioso, zorro villano...” (9:117) “…hijo siniestro de la mente insondable de Shakespeare…” (9:115); “…la triste Ofelia…” (8:160) “…rubia y pálida…” (6:325); "Hamlet fiero y doliente..." (6:325) “…amargo, vaporoso, filial, vengador, humano…” (10:131), Desdémona “… desdichadísima…” (9:117), Macbeth “ansioso” (10:108), “sombrío” (15:238), el Rey Lear “noble, generoso e infeliz…” (13:432), “…el desventurado Otelo…[…]…nobilísimo espíritu, traído a crimen por deficiencias de educación y arterías de traidor…” (9:11) o Julieta y Romeo, “…tipos imperecederos y reales de aquel combate de amor y de familias…” (15:51) En sus cuadernos de apuntes 18 y 20, aparecen, respectivamente, frases tomadas de Ricardo III (21:379) y de Rey Lear (21:461), mientras que en uno de sus Fragmentos hay una frase tomada de Todo está bien si termina bien. (22:224) Las valoraciones sobre Shakespeare son múltiples. En la Revista Universal de México de septiembre 2 de 1875 en su definición de poesía incluye a Shakespeare entre “…los ángeles rebeldes…” cuya poesía expresa “… inconformidades fieras con estrecheces irremediables de la vida…” propia de aquellos que pasan “…la vida, como arrancándose la carne que los envuelve y aprisiona…” (6:318) En sus Fragmentos, leemos: “Los versos de Shakespeare parecen león que se pliega, monumento que se levanta, copa de árbol que se mece, y de súbito, rosa que se abren. Es como si se fuera por la naturaleza, cambiando a cada momento de paisaje.” (22:308) En una de sus Escenas Norteamericanas desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas del 26 de noviembre de 1881, ofrece una de sus más amplias valoraciones del poeta inglés: “Shakespeare es uno. Rompió todos los moldes de la tragedia, y ajustó las suyas a un molde nuevo: el corazón humano. Debió ser su espíritu como seno de montaña, en que la rica veta de ónix se une al carbón negro. De singular bondad no hay huella en sus obras; mas sí las hay de no igualado poder de examen de la combatida mente, y los voraces y ciegos afectos humanos. Fue como si un hombre, víctima anterior de todas las enfermedades, se sentase en la altísima cúspide a dar la ley de todos. Abunda más en lo divino satánico que en lo divino celeste. Echó a andar por la tierra criaturas tremendas; mas no creó una gran figura llorosa, afligida de amor sobrehumano, perdonadora. A Shakespeare van los anglos a buscar aguas de inspiración como a inexhausta fuente, y como a Grecia y Roma vamos nosotros. De sus maravillas casuales, y de los caprichos de su exuberante genio, rico en creaciones como la atmósfera en celajes, han hecho los comentadores maravillas intencionales; y partos de mente laboriosa, allí donde no hubo más que una colosal y deslumbradora florescencia. Fue una selva, con todos los ruidos, luces lúgubres, castos matices, penetrantes aires, y fantasías enfermizas de la noche. Faltóle paz de alma, que es el fulgor del día. Mas no hubiera habido con ella este poeta dramático, que es montaña humana.” (9:116) En la Revista Universal de México de agosto 23 de 1876 había declarado su juicio sobre los grandes: “Es Calderón en el ingenio humano cima altísima, y allá en el cielo alto se hallan juntos, él y Shakespeare grandioso, a par de Esquilo, Schiller y el gran Goethe. Y a aquella altura: nadie más.” (6:439)


 Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 89. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

William Shakespeare

 

Shelley

Nombre completo: Percy Bysshe Shelley       

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta inglés 

Época: 1792-1822       

Obra citada directamente: Reina Mab       

Obra citada indirectamente: Peter Bell the Third     

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Shelley was another "bright particular star" of the same epoch. He was precocious in a remarkable degree. When a schoolboy at Eton, and only fifteen years of age, he composed and published a complete romance, out of the proceeds of which he gave a "spread" to his friends. He was early known as "mad Shelley” or "the atheist." At eighteen he published his Queen Mab, to which Leigh Hunt affixed the atheistical notes; at nineteen, he was expelled from University College, Oxford, for his defence of atheism; and between then and his thirtieth year, when he was accidentally drowned, he produced his wonderful series of poems. He was subject to the strangest illusions, and full of eccentricities. At college he was considered to be "cracked." Yet his intelligence was quick and subtle; every fibre of his fragile frame thrilled with sensitiveness; and the productions of his fertile genius were full of musical wildness and imagination, perhaps more than any poems that have ever been written, either before or since his time.” (1) Martí traduce: “Shelley sí fue precocísimo. Cuando estudiaba en Eton, a los quince años publicó una novela y dio un banquete a sus amigos con la ganancia de la venta. Era tan original y rebelde que todos le decían "el ateo Shelley", o "el loco Shelley". A los dieciocho publicó su poema de la Reina Mab, y a los diecinueve lo echaron del colegio por el atrevimiento con que defendió sus doctrinas religiosas; a los treinta años murió ahogado, con un tomo de versos de Keats en el bolsillo. Maravillosa es la poesía de Shelley por la música del verso, la elegancia de la construcción y la profundidad de las ideas. Era un manojo de nervios siempre vibrantes, y tenía tales ilusiones y rarezas que sus condiscípulos lo tenían por destornillado; pero su inteligencia fue vivísima y sutil, su cuerpo frágil se estremecía con las más delicadas emociones, y sus versos son de incomparable hermosura.” (18:398) Martí deja solo 153 palabras de las 183 de Smiles. Su traducción, si bien contiene los elementos esenciales del original, está imbuida indiscutiblemente de la admiración que siente por el personaje y el conocimiento de su obra. Hay cambios sencillos como la eliminación de partes del texto, la referencia al poeta y escritor inglés James Henry Leigh Hunt y la Universidad de Oxford, pero hay otros más profundos. Por ejemplo, Smiles simplemente narra los apelativos que recibía Shelley de “ateo” y “loco”, Martí  nos aclara que  le llamaban así por ser “tan original y rebelde”. Smiles explica que Shelley fue expulsado por la defensa de su ateísmo y Martí lo cambia “por el atrevimiento con que defendió sus doctrinas religiosas”. Ambos autores narran la muerte accidental de Shelley ahogado, a lo cual por Martí añade: “con un tomo de versos de Keats en el bolsillo.” La parte final de la reseña es una hermosa tradución libre y vibrante que poco tiene que ver con el tono didáctico y moralizante que caracteriza a Smiles, si bien toma de él los elementos básicos. Más adelante se menciona a Shelley durante la reseña de Byron como una referencia generacional, frase que Martí traduce. Posteriormente Smiles vuelve a mencionar a Shelley cuando dice “Though Shelley sarcastically said of Wordsworth that "he had no more imagination than a pint-pot," he was, nevertheless, like Shakespeare, a poet for all time. He showed none of the precocity which distinguished Shelley, but grew slowly and solidly, like an oak, until he reached his full stature." (2) Martí traduce: “Shelley dice de Wordsworth que "no tenía más imaginación que un cacharro", lo que no quita que sea Wordsworth un poeta inmortal. No fue precoz como Shelley; pero creció despacio y con firmeza, como un roble, hasta que llegó a su majestuosa altura." (18:400) Este comentario se refiere al Verso XVIII de la Parte Cuarta del poema de Shelley titulado Peter Bell the Third, escrito en 1819, en Florencia, como parodia del poema de Wordsworth Peter Bell de 1798. El verso en cuestión dice: “He had as much imagination/ As a pint-pot;—he never could/ Fancy another situation,/ From which to dart his contemplation,/ Than that wherein he stood.” (3) Hay varias referencias a este poeta en la obra martiana. En sus notas periodísticas desde La Opinión Nacional el 24 de enero de 1882 aparecen sus valoraciones del poeta Shelley: “Pocos nombres hay tan notorios en la moderna literatura inglesa como el del triste Shelley …” (23:168)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 91-92. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Smiles ob. cit., p. 94

(3) Percy Bysshe Shelley Peter Bell the Third

Percy Bysshe Shelley 

 

Sheridan

Nombre completo: Richard Brinsley  Sheridan

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Dramaturgo y director de teatro inglés

Época: 1751-1816

Obra citada directamente: School for Scandal (Escuela del Escándalo)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribió: "...while Sheridan crowned his reputation for dramatic genius by bringing out his perennially interesting School for Scandal at twenty-six." (1) Martí traduce: “A Sheridan lo llamaba su maestro "burro incorregible"; pero a los veintiséis años había escrito su Escuela del Escándalo.” (18:394). Este calificativo un tanto  humorístico de "burro incorregible" es creado por Martí a partir del texto que aparece en el Capítulo IV Grandes adultos en el propio libro de Samuel Smiles donde aparece escrito: "Even the brilliant Sheridan, when taken by his mother to a schoolmaster, was pronounced by her to be one of the most impenetrable dunces she had ever met with." (2) Al parecer, toda la información que Martí manejó sobre Sheridan fue tomada de Life and labour de Samuel Smiles pues no hemos hallado otras referencias a este personaje en la obra martiana. Sheridan, sagaz crítico de costumbres, es considerado el padre de la comedia irónica inglesa y su obra teatral en cinco actos La escuela del escándalo -que menciona Martí- ha ganado un merecido lugar en el repertorio del teatro universal por su aguda crítica a la maledicencia y la hipocresía, defectos humanos universales. 


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 89. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Smiles 1931. Ob. cit., Chapter IV. Great old men, pp 144.   

 Richard Brinsley Sheridan

 

Southey

Nombre completo: Robert Southey

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta y escritor inglés

Época: 1774-1843

Obra citada indirectamente:  The Doctor

Comentarios: Southey se cita dos veces en el artículo Músicos poetas y pintores. Al inicio del artículo Martí, traduciendo la misma idea de Smiles,  escribe: “Bien dijo el poeta Southey, que los primeros veinte años de la vida son los que tienen más poder en el carácter del hombre.” (18:390) En la versión de Great young man de Samuel Smiles aparece: “Southey says, “Live  as long as you may, the first twenty years are the longest half of your life; they appear so while they are passing; they seem to have been so when we look back upon them; and they take up more room in our memory than all the years that succeed them." (1) Como vemos, Martí toma solo la primera parte del aforismo de Southey, que Smiles pone completo y  expresa la idea de una forma más sintética. Este y otros aforismos de Southey aparecen en la edición de El Doctor (The Doctor) de 1834. Southey se menciona por segunda vez en Músicos poetas y pintores al referirse a Byron: "Byron era ya más célebre que Scott, Wordsworth, y Southey." (18:399). No hemos hallado referencias a este poeta en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931 Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 74. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp

Robert Southey

Spencer

Nombre completo: Edmundo Spenser    

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor inglés            

Época: 1552-1599                        

Obras citadas directamente: Faery Queen (La Reina Encantada)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Of English poets, perhaps the very greatest were not precocious, though many gave early indications of genius. We know very little of the youth of Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Spenser, and very little even of their manhood.” (1) Martí traduce: “Entre los poetas ingleses de la antigüedad hubo muy pocos precoces. Se sabe poco de Chaucer, Shakespeare y Spenser” (18:) Más adelante Smiles vuelve a mencionar al personaje: “Spenser published his first poem, The Shepherd's Calendar, at twenty-six…” (2) pero Martí no lo traduce. Finalmente, durante la reseña de Keats aparece de nuevo la figura de Spenser cuando Smiles dice: “… when the perusal of Spenser´s Faëry Queen set his mind on fire, and reading and writing poetry became the chief employment of his short existence.” (3) En una encantadora descripción, Martí traduce: “...no pareció revelársele la vocación hasta que leyó a los dieciséis años la Reina Encantada de Spenser: desde entonces sólo vivió para los versos.” (18:398) No hemos hallado otras referencias al autor en la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 89. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Samuel Smiles ob cit., p. 89

(3) Samuel Smiles ob cit., p. 91

Edmundo Spenser  

  

Tasso

Nombre completo: Torquato Tasso

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta italiano

Época: 1544-1595

Obras citadas directamente: Gerusalemme liberata/ Jerusalem delivered/ Jerusalén liberada

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Tasso possessed the same delicate, throbbing temperament of genius: he was a poet while but a child. At ten years old, when about to join his father at Rome, he composed a canzone on parting from his mother and sister at Naples. He compared himself to Ascanius escaping from Troy with his father Eneas. At seventeen he composed his Rinaldo in twelve cantos, and by his thirty-first year he had completed his great poem of Jerusalem Delivered, which he began at twenty-one." (1) Martí sintetiza su traducción, elimina la obra Rinaldo y traduce: “A los diez años lamentó Tasso en verso su separación de su madre y hermana, y se comparó al triste Ascanio cuando huía de Troya con su padre Eneas a cuestas; a los treinta y un años puso las últimas octavas a su poema de la Jerusalén, que empezó a los veinticinco.” (18:395) Hay algunas referencias a Tasso en la obra martiana.  En sus noticias sobre Italia desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas en 1882 evoca la figura de Tasso cuando se pregunta: “¿Quién cantará junto al timón de la góndola, las estanzas del Tasso? (14:171) como lo hace el 2 de  noviembre de 1887 al referirse a “… la voz del lánguido barquero que cantaba en otros días versos del Tasso…” (14:337) En sus Fragmentos, en un listado alfabético con el encabezamiento "Diccionario" aparece el nombre de Tasso  junto al de otras 16 personalidades, cada una con un número al lado que parece ser los números de páginas correspondientes (22:127). También en sus Fragmentos se encuentra este comentario: “La mitología engendró la Ilíada; el espiritualismo a Fausto; la teología al Dante; la caballería al Tasso.” (22:97)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 84. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Torquato Tasso

Tennyson

Nombre completo: Alfred Tennyson   

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Poeta inglés     

Época: 1809-1892                

Obras citadas: Ninguna      

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: “Alfred Tennyson wrote his first volume of poems at eighteen, while at nineteen he gained the Chancellor's Medal at Cambridge for his poem of Timbuctoo, and at twenty he published his Lyrical Poems, which contained some of his most admired pieces. (1) Martí traduce: "A los veinte había escrito Tennyson algunas de las poesías melodiosas que han hecho ilustre su nombre.” (18:399) Como se observa, en su traducción Martí elimina las obras mencionadas por Smiles (Timbuctoo y Lyrical Poems) y ofrece solo una reseña sucinta.  En la obra martiana hay varias referencias a Tennyson. En su ensayo sobre el poeta Walt Whitman, en El Partido Liberal de México en 1887 se refiere a "...Tennyson, que es de los que ven las raíces de las cosas…” (13: 132) En carta a Enrique Estrázulas de febrero 19 de 1888 le dice: “La “Dora” de Tennyson es linda…” (20:190) En una de sus Cartas de Nueva York, de La Opinión Nacional de Caracas el 19 de octubre de 1881, leemos: “…Tennyson, el bardo laureado, el feliz renovador de la vieja y gráfica lengua inglesa, el autor de afamadas elegías y de delicados y profundos retratos de mujer…” (9: 54) En  una de sus crónicas periodísticas de La Opinión Nacional, el 4 de mayo de 1882 habla así del poeta:  “Tennyson es en Inglaterra “el poeta laureado”. Los ingleses acogen sus versos con el mismo recogimiento y cariño con que los franceses leen los de Víctor Hugo. El no es poeta humanitario de anchas miras; sino poeta de sí mismo, y de amores, y lindas damas, y escenas pintorescas y cuadros bellos. Su fama en los Estados Unidos es tal que cada vez que se publica una nueva poesía suya, de Inglaterra la transmiten a los Estados Unidos por el cable. Así acaban de transmitir su poesía última “Carga de la Brigada Pesada”. Es una obra de poesía mental, como muchas de Tennyson; es la narración, en metros imitativos, de las cosas que va narrando, del ataque de “los bravos Enniskillens y Creys”, que en número de trescientos, cargaron a caballo y vencieron a millares de rusos. El poeta ha imitado el galopar de los caballos, el descender en masa de los enemigos vocingleros, el revólver y jinetear de los trescientos, el huracánico brío con que arremetieron y pusieron en fuga a sus contrarios. Es una linda obra de arte, y no más que eso, la poesía nueva de Tennyson.” (23:289) Hay menciones y citas de Tennyson en sus cuadernos de apuntes y en el número 8, hablando del poeta Longfellow dice: “Sus versos son tranquilos, blandos. Perfumados., como escritos en elegante cenador, o rico gabinete: -algo de Tennyson.” (21:233)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 93. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Alfred Tennyson  

Thordvaldsen

Nombre completo: Bertel Thorvaldsen

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escultor danés

Época: 1770-1844

Obra citada directamente: Cupid resting (Amor en reposo)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: "Thorwaldsen carved figure-heads for ships when thirteen working in the shop of his father, who was a wood-carver. At fifteen, he carried off the silver medal of the Academy of Arts at Copenhagen for his bas-relief of Cupid Reposing; and at twenty, he gained the gold medal for his drawing of Heliodorus Driven from the Temple." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores, traduciendo a Samuel Smiles, Martí nos dice: “Thorvaldsen tallaba, a los trece, mascarones para los barcos en el taller de su padre, que era escultor en madera; y a los quince ganó la medalla en Copenhague por su bajorrelieve del Amor en Reposo.” (18:394) Se refiere Martí al bajorrelieve de Thorvaldsen titulado Cupid Resting, que se conserva en el Thorvaldsens Museum de Dinamarca con el No. A 756 de inventario. Comparativamente, el texto de Smiles es algo más extenso y menciona una obra que Martí elimina. Ya hemos comentado que la exclusión de obras fue un recurso empleado por Martí en su adaptación de Músicos, poetas y pintores, para ajustar a su espacio la extensa información de Smiles.(2) No hallamos referencias de este escultor en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Herrera, A. 1989. Análisis comparativo de Niños Famosos de Samuel Smiles y Músicos, Poetas y Pintores de José Martí. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, La Habana, Cuba,  12: 235-247.

Bertel Thorvaldsen,

cuadro de Carl Joseph Begas

Detalle de Cupid resting

Tintoreto

Nombre completo: Jacopo Comin

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor italiano

Época: 1518-1594

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe: Tintoretto was so skilful with his pencil and brush that his master Titian, becoming jealous, discharged him from his service. But this rebuff had the effect of giving additional vigour to his energies, and he worked with such rapidity that he used to be called Il Furioso, until he came to be recognised as one of the greatest and most prolific painters in Italy.” (1) Martí traduce casi textualmente, pero sintéticamente: “Tintoreto era un discípulo tan aventajado que su maestro Tiziano se enceló de él y lo despidió de su servicio. El desaire le dio ánimo en vez de acobardarlo, y siguió pintando tan de prisa que le decían "el furioso". (18:394) Hay algunas referencias a Tintoreto en la obra martiana. Para mayor información sobre éste y otros personajes del artículo, remitimos a nuestro ensayo comparativo. (2) En la Revista Universal de México de agosto de 1875, hablando de los cuadros del pintor mexicano Felipe Gutiérrez dice: “Es el estilo libre y propio de un pintor que ha visto la vida en los cuadros de Miguel Ángel, Ribera y Tintoretto.” (6: 379) En sus notas sobre Goya que aparecen en su cuaderno de apuntes de 1879, leemos: “Los ásperos reales rostros del Tintoretto, muy a menudo sorprendidos a la entrada de la alegre taberna, al ver pasar senuda moza al reposar de mal grado en el bullente campamento.” (15:143). En sus Noticias de Italia desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas, de octubre de 1881 nos habla de La Exposición de pinturas donde está “…Tintoretto, con sus figuras resueltas y elocuentes…” (14:87).


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Herrera, A. 1989. Análisis comparativo de Niños Famosos de Samuel Smiles y Músicos, Poetas y Pintores de José Martí. Anuario del Centro de Estudios Martianos, La Habana, Cuba,  12: 235-247.

Jacopo Comin

Tiziano

Nombre completo: Tiziano Vecellio

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor y escultor italiano

Época: 1485-1576             

Obras citadas: Ninguna

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles, al hacer la reseña de Tintoretto dice: “…his master Titian, becoming jealous, discharged him from his service. “ (1) Martí traduce: “…su maestro Tiziano se enceló de él y lo despidió de su servicio.” (18:394) La obra martiana está llena de referencias a Tiziano. En su cuaderno de apuntes número 8 (1880-1882) hay una referencia a su cuadro La Magdalena. (21:246). En sus Noticias de Italia desde La Opinión Nacional de Caracas, de octubre de 1881 nos habla de La Exposición de pinturas donde está “…el Tiziano, con sus diosas fornidas…” (14:87). En uno de sus fragmentos sobre arte, concluye: “He tenido largas pláticas con la Venus del Ticiano. Me he traído una a casa y vivimos castamente en deliciosa compañía.” (222:285). Al comentar las obras de otros pintores suele usar a Tiziano como elemento de comparación. En su artículo sobre arte El desnudo del salón, describe un cuadro de Julio Lefebvre con estas palabras: “…una muchacha dormida, de piel voluptuosamente húmeda, de mejillas encarnadas, vivas, que incitaban a rogarle que se despertase. Diríase que era la Dánae del Ticiano.” (19:254). En sus notas sobre Goya que aparecen en su cuaderno de apuntes de 1879, alaba La Maja con estas palabras: “…recuerdan por su colocación las piernas de la más hermosa de las Venus reclinadas de Ticiano.” (15:131). En sus crónicas de La Nación de Buenos Aires de junio de 1889 hace siete menciones del Tiziano, entre ellas a  su “… cuadro famoso… […]… EI Santo Entierro…” (19:346); al “…rincón de cielo azul que era en Tiziano como marca personal.” (19:347) y nos ofrece esta emotiva alabanza: “¿Quién sino el Tiziano, pudo componer ese grupo inefable con su Cristo amortajado del que parece salir una claridad celeste con aquella luz sabia que cae sobre el brazo realzado de Jesús y la cabeza de María, con las túnicas pardas y azules que se destacan sin crudeza, calladas y vivas, de la sombra armoniosa del fondo, en aquel aire de oro, como flotante y musical, el que el Tiziano envuelve sus pinturas?” (19:347) Otra cita de Martí que evoca al Tiziano al describir a su esposa Carmen, nos llega de la mano de Gonzalo de Quesada: "Tiene el color blanco anacarado, los labios de un punzó natural, con la suavidad de terciopelo, los ojos pardos rasgados, con mirada angelical y el cabello de ese color castaño dorado, como lo pintaba Tiziano…” (2)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

(2) Gonzalo de Quesada y Miranda: Martí, hombre. Seoane Fdez y Cía, Impresores, Compostela, La Habana, 1940, p. 90

Tiziano Vecellio

Verrochio

Nombre completo:  Andrea del Verrocchio     

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Pintor y escultor italiano   

Época: 1435-1488   

Obras citadas directamente: El bautismo de Cristo     

Comentarios: En Great young men, como parte de la reseña de Leonardo da Vinci, Smiles escribe: “When a pupil under Verrocchio, he painted an angel in a picture by his master on the "Baptism of Christ”. It was painted so exquisitely that Verrocchio felt his inferiority to his pupil so much, that from that time forth he gave up painting in despair.” (1) Martí traduce: “En un cuadro de su maestro Verrocchio pintó un ángel de tanta hermosura que el maestro, desconsolado de verse inferior al discípulo, dejó para siempre su arte.”  (18:394) La traducción de Martí es bastante ajustada al original con la eliminación del nombre del cuadro de Verrocchio, posiblemente eliminado pues Verrocchio no era el centro de la reseña, sino Leonardo. Esta anécdota que relata Smiles y traduce Martí aparece en la página 22 del libro Las Vidas de los más excelentes pintores, escultores y arquitectos del arquitecto y pintor italiano Giorgio Vasari (2) libro que por cierto, es citado por Martí en su artículo Galería de Colón en Patria el 16 de abril de 1893 (5:205) En la obra referida, Vasari menciona la intervención de Leonardo en el cuadro y afirma que Verrocchio acabó disgustado, al sentirse superado por su propio aprendiz. La leyenda cuenta que llegó a romper sus pinceles prometiendo no volver a pintar nunca jamás, si bien esto último no es cierto. No hemos hallado otras referencias a VerrocchioVerrocchio en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 83. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.    

(2) Giorgio Vasari 1878. Leonardo da Vinci Pp. 2-53.  En: Le vite de'più eccellenti pittori, scultori ed architettori. Con nuove annotazioni e commenti di Gaetano Milanesi. Firenze G.C. Sansoni, 652 pp.

Andrea del Verrocchio     

El bautismo de Cristo de  Verrocchio, donde Leonardo dibujo el ángel de perfil arrodillado a la izquierda.

Detalle del ángel dibujado por Leonardo en El bautismo de Cristo de  su maestro Verrocchio

Portada del libro de Vasari donde se relata la anécdota de Verrochio y su alumno Leonardo, que  transcribimos a continuación:

"Acconciossi dunque, come è detto, per via di ser Piero, nella sua fanciullezza all' arte con Andrea del Verrocchio, il quale facendo una tavola dove San Giovanni battezzava Cristo, Lionardo lavorò un angelo che teneva alcune vesti; e benché fosse giovanetto, lo condusse di tal maniera, che molto meglio delle figure d'Andrea stava l'angelo di Lionardo; il che fu cagione ch'Andrea mai più non volle toccar colori, sdegnatosi che un fanciullo ne sapesse più di lui..." (Giorgio Vasari En: Leonardo da Vinci. Le vite de'più eccellenti pittori, scultori ed architettori, p. 22)

 

Víctor Hugo

Nombre completo: Victor Hugo         

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor francés                

Época: 1802-1885                           

Obras citadas directamente: Irtamene/ Bug Jargal/ Hans de Islandia/ Odas y Baladas   

Comentarios: En Great young men,  Samuel Smiles, escribe:  “Victor Hugo was an equally precocious dramatist. He wrote his first tragedy of Irtamene when fifteen years old. He carried off three successive prizes at the Academy des Jeunes Floraux, and thus won the title of Master in that Institution. At twenty he wrote Bug Jargal, and in the following year his Hans d'Islande and his first volume of Odes et Ballades. The contemporary poets of France were then nearly all young men. "No writer," said the sarcastic critic Moreau, "is now respected in France if he is above eighteen years of age”. (1) Martí sintetiza y traduce: “Víctor Hugo no tenía más que quince años cuando escribió su tragedia Irtamene. Ganó tres premios seguidos en los juegos florales; a los veinte escribió Bug Jargal, y un año después su novela Hans de Islandia, y sus primeras Odas y Baladas. Casi todos los poetas franceses de su tiempo eran muy jóvenes. "En Francia", decía en burla el crítico Moreau, "ya no hay quien respete a un escritor si tiene más de dieciocho años". (18:397) 


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 88. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.                                    

Victor Hugo      

Voltaire

Nombre completo: Francisco Maria Arouet     

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor francés        

Época: 1694-1778     

Obras citadas directamente: Edipo/ Henriada   

Comentarios: En Great young men,  Samuel Smiles, escribe: “Voltaire began by satirising the Fathers of the Jesuit College in which he was educated as early as his twelfth year, when Pere le Jay is said to have prophesied of him "qu'il serait en France le coryphee du Deisme." His father wished him to apply himself to the study of law, and believed him to be ruined when he discovered, that he wrote verses and frequented the gay circles of Paris. At twenty, Voltaire was imprisoned in the Bastile for writing satires upon the voluptuous tyrant who then misgoverned France. While there, he corrected his tragedy of Œdipe, which he had written at nineteen, and then he began his Henriade. The tragedy was performed when Voltaire was in his twenty-second year.” (1) Martí elimina algunos datos biográficos, sintetiza y traduce: “Voltaire a los doce escribía sátiras contra los padres jesuitas del colegio en que se estaba educando: su padre quería que estudiase leyes, y se desesperó cuando supo que el hijo andaba recitando versos entre la gente alegre de París: a los veinte años estaba Voltaire preso en la Bastilla por sus versos burlescos contra el rey vicioso que gobernaba en Francia: en la prisión corrigió su tragedia de Edipo, y comenzó su poema la Henriada.” (18:396) Hay varias referencias a Voltaire en la obra martiana. En sus fragmentos leemos: “He de escribir cuatro libros: Rafael, Miguel Ángel, Voltaire, Rousseau.” (22:246)


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 87-88. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.                     

                                                                   

Francisco Maria Arouet  

 

Weber

Nombre completo: Carlos Maria von Weber

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Músico alemán

Época: 1786-1826

Obras citadas directamente: Las Ninfas del bosque (Waldmedchen)/ El Cazador (Der Freischutz)

Comentarios: En Great young men,  Samuel Smiles, en referencia a Weber había escrito: "Weber, though a scapegrace of a boy, had a marvellous capacity for music. His first six fugues were published at Salzburg when he was only twelve years old. His first opera, Das Waldmddchen, was performed at Vienna, Prague, and St. Petersburg when he was fourteen; and he composed masses, sonatas, violin trios, songs, and other works, until in his thirty-sixth year he produced his opera of Der Freisckutz, which raised his reputation to the greatest height." (1) En Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí nos dice “Weber, que era un muchacho muy travieso, publicó a los doce sus seis primeras fugas, y a los catorce compuso su ópera Las Ninfas del Bosque: la famosísima del Cazador la compuso a los treinta y seis.” (18:392) Con esta última, se refiere Martí a la conocida Ópera en tres actos El Cazador furtivo estrenada en Berlín en 1821. Como puede verse el contenido de Smiles es mucho más largo que el de Martí y las óperas aparecen en alemán por lo que Martí debió reducir el texto y traducir las obras. No hallamos referencias de Weber en el resto de la obra martiana.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 79. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Carlos Maria von Weber

 

Wieland

Nombre completo: Christoph Martin Wieland

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor alemán

Época: 1733-1813

Obras citadas directamente: Die vollkommenste Welt  (El mundo perfecto)

Comentarios: En Great young men, Smiles escribe:Wieland was one of the most precocious of German poets. He read at three years old; Cornelius Nepos in Latin at seven; and meditated the composition of an epic at thirteen. Like other poets, the fact of his falling in love first stimulated him to verse; for at sixteen he wrote his first didactic poem on Die Vollkommenste Welt. (1)  En Músicos, poetas y pintores Martí traduce: “Wieland, el poeta alemán, leía de corrido a los tres años, a los siete traducía del latín a Cornelio Nepote, y a los dieciséis escribió su primer poema didáctico de El Mundo Perfecto.“ (18:395) Die vollkommenste Welt,  también conocido como La naturaleza de las cosas (Die Natur der Dinge) que Martí traduce como El Mundo Perfecto fue escrito en 1752. Se trata de un poema antilucreciano en seis tomos. No hemos hallado referencias a Wieland en el resto de la obra martiana.  


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 85. En: Life and Labour or characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.

Christoph Martin Wieland

Wordsworth

Nombre completo: William Wordsworth    

Actividad/ Nacionalidad: Escritor inglés            

Época: 1770-1850        

Obras citadas indirectamente: Cuartetas heroicas    

Comentarios: En Great young men, este personaje se cita durante la reseña de Byron pero posteriormente tiene su espacio propio cuando Smiles dice: “Wordsworth, though left very much to himself when a boy, and of a rather moody and perverse nature, nevertheless began to write verses in the style of Pope in his fourteenth or fifteenth year. Though Shelley sarcastically said of Wordsworth that "he had no more imagination than a pint-pot," he was, nevertheless, like Shakespeare, a poet for all time. He showed none of the precocity which distinguished Shelley, but grew slowly and solidly, like an oak, until he reached his full stature. “ (1) En su traducción Martí dice: “… y Wordsworth, que era agrio y melancólico de niño, empezó a hacer  cuartetas heroicas a los catorce Shelley dice de Wordsworth que “no tenía más imaginación que un cacharro”, lo que no quita que sea Wordsworth un poeta inmortal. No fue precoz como Shelley; pero creció despacio y con firmeza, como un roble, hasta que llegó a su majestuosa altura.” (18:400) Como se observa, Martí cambia “versos al estilo de Pope” por “cuartetas heroicas” y elimina la comparación con Shakespeare. En La Nación de Buenos Aires, el 20 de junio de 1883   incorpora la figura de Wordsworth de manera comparativa durante la crítica de un libro: “Este es un libro nuevo, que cuenta la vida, demasiado apacible de William Cullen Bryant, que fue poeta, blanco poeta, al modo cómodo de Woodsworth, no como aquellos otros infortunados y gloriosos, que se alimentan de sus mismas entrañas. (9:413) En su cuaderno de apuntes número 18, anotó: "Yo no sabía quién era Wordsworth, yo no l0 había leído nunca, en Wordsworth ni en nadie, cuando dije lo mismo que él dijo, y con las mismas palabras, una por una: -l0 que sale del corazón, va al corazón. (En Guatemala? Discurso sobre la Elocuencia). En W: -That which comes from the heart, goes to the heart."  (21: 405) Aunque esta cita alude a Wordsworth todas las fuentes consultadas se la atribuyen a Samuel Taylor Coleridge.


Notas: (1) Samuel Smiles 1931. Chapter III. Great young men. Pp. 93-94. En: Life and Labour or Characteristics of Men of Industry, Culture and Genius, London John Murray, 384 pp.       

                                                                               

William Wordsworth